Questions tagged [syntactic-analysis]

Parsing or syntactic analysis is the process of analysing a string of symbols, conforming to the rules of a formal grammar.

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Sentence correction query [duplicate]

Is this sentence structure correct ? A society so vibrant and diverse as America’s is bound to dominate. My basic confusion is that whether to put ’s at the end of the subject or not. Another ...
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“Member FDIC” instead of “Member of FDIC”?

For several years now (as long as I've paid attention) almost every ad or commercial for a bank or credit union says they are Member FDIC or Member NCUA. Where is the of? Why are these not Member of ...
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Sentences that do not contain the classic subject and predicate structure [duplicate]

I understand the classic definition of a sentence is one that contains a predicate and a subject, but is it okay to have shorter sentences that don't follow this structure for effect? For example, if ...
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Little did I suspect that she would sign a new contract.(inversion) [duplicate]

Why is it inversion? We use DID after the word LITTLE. If I see another example,I'll understand .So-Not until we saw our kids with our own eyes did we believe they were really safe and sound- in that ...
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How do you parse the sentence?

The original sentence: In this way, we have learned all that we know of the laws of astronomy, or of the habits of the social insects, let us say. Please let me make it simpler as below: In ...
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Sentences with “participle clauses” [closed]

Are these sentences below grammatically correct and understandable? And which version of each example is more appropriate? 1- He is a bookworm, having lived first in Canada and then having moved ...
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2answers
50 views

Will vs Going to [duplicate]

I’m a bit baffled about these two structures: going to and will. Here’s an example of where I get confused: Liverpool’s players are known to be skilled. They ....... the match easily. A) will win. ...
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2answers
650 views

Why does this sentence sounds weird?

I applied to a summer program and the email stated that I was deferred. We are pleased to inform you that your application has made a select list of deferrals to the regular application round. ...
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crashed out in practice for the Australian grand prix

An English dictionary gives the following example sentence: Schumacher crashed out in practice for the Australian grand prix. I'd like to know how to parse "crashed out in practice for the ...
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58 views

What does “Disturb not X” mean?

I already know what the word disturb means, but I do not understand what disturb not means. I’ve seen titles that start with this, like Disturb Not the Dream and Disturb Not the Sleep, etc. What does ...
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Feel confused about the use of “seem” or “seems” in these two sentences

I saw the first sentence in a book, and I thought it was a mistake. I googled it and realized that many writers had used it on the websites. But then I googled the second sentence and found many ...
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3answers
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Comparing negatives (It is nice not to be rude.) vs. (It isn't nice to be rude.) [duplicate]

What is the difference in style and meaning between the following two in terms of the adjective "nice"? (It is nice not to be rude.) (It isn't nice to be rude.) besides, what is the difference in ...
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Which line in each pair (below) is correct? [duplicate]

As a trainer of English as second language, the following statements have caused much dismay among my students. Kindly help clarify. Which line in each pair (below) is correct? They are all there ...
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“Instead of ʏᴏᴜʀ calling” vs “Instead of ʏᴏᴜ calling” [duplicate]

Which is better: Instead of your calling, maybe I should do it. Instead of you calling, maybe I should do it. I feel like the first one is the better choice here because instead of needs a gerund, ...
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25 views

(Noun to verb np) structure and grammar [duplicate]

I can't understand the grammar and structure of following sentence: "YouTube to Remove Thousands of Videos Pushing Extreme Views" I think something is omitted, it should be: "YouTube is to remove..." ...
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93 views

“I know him ʙᴇɪɴɢ honest” vs “I know him ᴛᴏ ʙᴇ honest”

The intended original sentence before conversion is: I know that he is an honest man. I want to know about these two possible reformulated versions of that sentence that replace the original’s ...
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2answers
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Is this sentence wrong or right? why? “I am going to school by bus everyday”

We have this conversations here at our office about this sentence. "I am going to school by bus everyday" I said that this sentence is right and nothing is wrong about it. but my friends says that ...
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2answers
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Who is lost in thought in “I had no glimmer of what was in his mind, nor did he enlighten me, but sat lost in thought…”? [closed]

I'd like someone to clear up the sentence that seems ambiguous to me. It's from "The problem of the Thor Bridge" by Conan Doyle. I had no glimmer of what was in his mind, nor did he enlighten me, ...
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Is this correct to say? [duplicate]

"forced to make due with" I don't know it doesn't sound right to me, is it grammatically correct?
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3answers
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'Would you prefer for me to do X?' or 'Would you prefer me to do X?'—which is better in English and why? [closed]

For example, is it better to say Would you prefer for me to come in today or tomorrow? or Would you prefer me to come in today or tomorrow? What is the grammatical reason for including the '...
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Can I use -ing verbs within a sentence that's in the past tense?

Is this sentence grammatically correct? The dashes are em dashes. This is the last sentence of a paragraph that is in the past tense: But I continued to work—building, learning, and simply loving ...
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2answers
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'How comes it' or 'How come is it'?

I was reading this paper and I came across this sentence, which I found quite odd. In the words of Bertrand Russell, the problem is this: “How comes it that human beings, whose contacts with the ...
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3answers
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What are the meaning and grammar of “Crying isn't like you”? [closed]

Can I say that something is not like somebody like this: Crying isn’t like you. What is its meaning?
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38 views

Looking for the grammar terms to describe the components of a question

Questions like these: "How do I increase productivity in my organization?" "How do I increase pro-social behavior in my community?" I want to say that in all of these questions, the second part (e.g....
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Is 'too big of an issue' correct?

Recently, when writing an email, I used the following phrase: 'I hope this does not cause too big of an issue' However, in their response, the recipient (an English teacher) said that he was 'not ...
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For the expression “bumf**k, Egypt”, is “bumf**k” an adjective and “Egypt” a noun? [closed]

I'm asking about the structure of the expression. If the answer is YES, then what's the reason for the comma. Besides, which Egypt is meant, "The Arab Republic of Egypt" or that "region of Illinois", ...
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1answer
197 views

What is the grammatical structure of the expression “F*** you!” and its derivatives?

I heard that expression along with its derivatives so many times, in movies or otherwise, but I can't get it grammatically, meaning, does it stand for a complete sentence like "I will fuck you!" or "I ...
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2answers
120 views

In “You did me wrong”, is “wrong” an adverb or some other part of speech instead?

Consider: You did me wrong. In that sentence, is wrong an adverb or some other part of speech? I don’t understand the syntactic construction being used here.
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4answers
312 views

Is it still an indirect object if you're taking something away?

So Jim is the indirect object in the sentence "Sally gave Jim a sandwich." But is Jim still the indirect object if the sentence is "Sally took the sandwich from Jim"? And if the sentence were to ...
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3answers
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Is “Which country are you guys at?” correct?

I'm not sure whether this sentence is right. " Which country are you guys at?" I said this without any hesitation but ... I don't think it's right. I'm not 100% sure. So my own corrections are: ...
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Comparison of equality used as Adjunct - As good/happy as

I came across this sentence in A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini: As happy as she was about this pregnancy, his expectation weighed on her. I was trying to parse this sentence and was ...
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Should I refer to “Section 2.3” or “Subsection 2.3”?

When writing a document that is divided into numbered sections and subsections, sometimes I would like to refer a certain subsection that has been numbered 2.3, for example. Here the 2 represents the ...
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358 views

“Identify as” or “identify themselves as”

I came across this paragraph in a newspaper. "He explains the significance of these diverse realities: 'An occupational identity, where people identify as farmers, is emerging in States of the first ...
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2answers
100 views

How to say it properly?

How can you say to a child not to pour water on you when she is taking a bath? My sister use the term don't wet me and it sounds off
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466 views

Correct usage of “lest”

Which of the followings is/are the correct usage of the word "lest"? How are these different from each other? ...hesitant to speak out lest he be fired. ...hesitant to speak out lest he'd be fired. .....
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I envisage that it does not. Can the sentence exist?

The sentence is my answer to the question of whether robots will replace teachers in the future. I am not a linguist or a native speaker, therefore I cannot tell the truth. Personally, I speculate ...
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1answer
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At one time operating vs At one time it operated

Since "at one time" is a time indicator, shouldn't the gerund "operating" be equivalent, while giving a better flow joining sentences? Or is it more confusing/improper? Preceding text of the same ...
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168 views

Other examples of or name of an indefinitely repeating phrase in a sentence

I'm looking for other examples of or the name of this kind of structure from The Stanley Parable: "The end is never the end is never the end is never the end is never the end is never the end is ...
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51 views

Why ”were” and not “was” in “and e’en to tell it ᴡᴇʀᴇ no easy task”?

I am reading a translation of Dante’s Inferno made by Cary in 1805. Here I cite the translator’s text for the opening of Canto I: In the midway of this our mortal life, I found me in a gloomy ...
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2answers
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What is the relative pronoun “whose” acting as in the dependent clause

I'm trying to understand how to diagram the following sentence. "Teachers whose students are motivated happily work overtime" I believe "whose students are motived" is a dependent adjective clause, ...
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5answers
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How to ask for the title on cheque?

If I need to know whose name should I put in title of a cheque, what would be the most precise and educated sentence? I have to pay someone some money via cheque but I want to ask them whose name ...
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1answer
376 views

Grammatical name

What is the grammatical name and function of "The variety of vitamins and nutrients in green beans" help prevent many health problems
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48 views

Do I need whom in this sentence? [duplicate]

"One of the benefits of this is that it will eliminate gym anxiety if you have any because you are with someone whom you trust."
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1answer
83 views

Complex object grammar and other things [closed]

I've seen a number of different phrases in different books describing the action of closing a door, and I'm not quite sure that I fully understand the grammar behind them. For example: (1) [He] ...
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62 views

placement of 'per year' in a sentence

In the first sentence, the term ‘per year’ is placed within the sentence and in the second sentence, at the end. Which pattern is correct and which one is wrong? The business purchases about ...
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2answers
19k views

Is “considering taking” grammatically correct?

I've seen the following sentence in a newspaper. Is it grammatical? He's considering taking early retirement. Taking = present progressive was used near another present progressive?
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174 views

Is “or and” equivalent to “and or”? [closed]

In common English, we can use the phrase "and or" to indicate that any of the following cases can apply, e.g. "I can have a strawberry and or a banana", meaning I can have either the strawberry, the ...
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5answers
672 views

What's a word or phrase to describe the discovery of something startlingly obvious?

Along the lines of Occam's razor, but I'd like to be able to use it in a sentence regarding something specific for my college essay. Here's the context: I grew up in the same house my father ...
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2answers
8k views

the usage of “such that”

I looked up the usage of "such that" in the dictionary, it says: "such that, so that: used to express purpose or result: power such that it was effortless" if the subordinate clause following "such ...
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1answer
188 views

Word being modified by whose

I came across the following sentence: Kiran is Kishore's uncle, whose paternal grandfather has only two children. I am not clear which person whose is referring to - Kiran or Kishore and why?