Questions tagged [syntactic-analysis]

Parsing or syntactic analysis is the process of analysing a string of symbols, conforming to the rules of a formal grammar.

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Constituent Structure

David is the best player [in the world]. is PP in the world an immediate constituent of the NP the best player in the world [is [the best player [in the world]]] or is it an immediate constituent ...
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How the west was won - Is this a noun phrase?

I'm trying to determine what the following types of phrases (in bold within the sentences below) would be called. I want to say they're noun phrases, but I may be wrong. To me, these resolve to ...
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What are the parts of speech in the sentence: Regular exercise strengthens the heart, thereby reducing the risk of heart attack [migrated]

Can anyone break this sentences into parts of speech? Regular exercise strengthens the heart, thereby reducing the risk of heart attack What is the conjunction in this sentence joining the two ...
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1answer
61 views

How can “of me doing something” be grammatically correct? What grammar rule is this? [duplicate]

The first book on my list has actually been recommended to me like multiple times over the years of me doing BookTube. I found that sentence in my English book, and the last part where it reads of ...
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Why is “dark” an adverb in “dark blue”?

The sky is dark blue. Source: BBC English Catherine: The sky is dark blue. The sky is dark blue. Finn: So, is blue an adjective or adverb? Catherine: It’s an adjective. Blue is ...
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Using adjective before the word “something/someone” [migrated]

We normally use these kinds of sentences: I need something strong or I have to hire someone intelligent. Here, the words "strong" and "intelligent" modify the nouns something and someone.So,we can ...
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“Coward” Vs “Cowardly” [closed]

In the following link, the word "cowardly" is used as an adjective (I know that structurally it is an adverb): Source: "Cowardly" is always a bad thing. A cowardly person lacks bravery, and ...
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1answer
29 views

resulting from or resulted from?

Which one of these sentences is correct? For an academic paper The third theme resulting from focus group interviews was cultural barriers. The third theme resulted from focus group interviews was ...
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1answer
43 views

What part of speech is “almost” when applied to an adjective? [closed]

If I say that "the box is almost flat" what part of speech is "almost"? I can't say "the box is almost", so it does not appear to be an adjective itself. It seems to be a word that modifies the ...
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20 views

Can the sentence be combined? [migrated]

The cost of a tailored suit and the time required for a tailored suit...... Can the above be written as follow: The cost and time required for a tailored suit ...... The cost of and time ...
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2answers
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Subject/Object Confusion in The Silmarillion [duplicate]

In Tolkein's "The Silmarillion", page 216 of the chapter "Of Túrin Turambar", the following is written: "[...] this Wildman was the Mormegil of Nargothrond, whom rumour said was the son of Húrin ...
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Which verb is to be used? [duplicate]

In this sentence from an exercise in a book I read, we are asked to select the right verb: She is one of those gifted writers who (turn / turns) out one best seller after another. I thought the ...
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Confused, whether both the clauses are independent

In the sentence are both the clauses independent? Surely Isabella had not told him that she was an engaged woman; otherwise, he would not have flattered her with so much attention (Norhtanger Abbey,...
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1answer
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"The economic and health [crisis | crises] can be tackled together.”

Is this sentence correct with plural crises: The economic and health crises can be tackled together. or should it instead be this one with a singular crisis: The economic and health crisis can be ...
2
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1answer
55 views

Why the comma is used in the sentence by Jane Austen [duplicate]

I cannot understand the usage of comma after "chapel" in this sentence: Its long, damp passages, its narrow cells and ruined chapel, were to be within her daily reach, and she could not entirely ...
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1answer
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I have got a car (Present Simple or Present Perfect?)

I was taught that ‘have got’ means tener and you can also use ‘have’ [Present Simple] I have got a car./I have a car I haven't got a car./I don't have a car Have I got a car?/Do I have a car? ...
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2answers
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Singular or plural after Subject + modal + base form of the verb

For example: A well thought-out system streamlines operation, improves work process, reduces data redundancy..... If can is added to the sentence, should the following verb be singular or plural?...
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Explain what happened on the meeting today [closed]

I am middle level English speaker/writer and I am working for international company. My native language is Bulgarian and I have never studied English professionally. Pretty much all I know is from the ...
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What does “to shout over” mean, particularly as it has been used in a particular passage I’ve read with curious sytnax? [migrated]

I don’t un­der­stand the mean­ing of shout over as it has been used in the fol­low­ing pas­sage from Pa­tri­cia High­smith’s novel, The Ta­lented Mr. Ri­p­ley: A well-dressed Ital­ian greeted ...
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1answer
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Help regarding the subject in a sentence

Could anyone please tell me what would be the subject in the following sentence which I have taken from the National Geographic website: Providing pools of water for frogs when other water is ...
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17 views

Proper Use of Commas, Semi-Colons, and Colons

I am curious as to what would be the proper use of Commas and colons when adding your degree on a resume. Which would be correct, or are both suitable? Master of Science in Finance, GPA: 3.9/4.0 ...
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How should I correctly write the term 'get well soon card'?

My instincts tell me that the examples below may be correct; however, I could not find in corroborating sources online. She received many 'Get Well Soon' cards. He opened the mail to find yet ...
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In “behind the house was an old culvert”, is “behind the house” a complement or an adjunct?

In behind the house was an old culvert, is behind the house the subject of was, or is it an adjunct? I had it down as an adjunct but am changing my mind. If it's an adjunct, what rule allows us to ...
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Little did I suspect that she would sign a new contract.(inversion) [duplicate]

Why is it inversion? We use DID after the word LITTLE. If I see another example,I'll understand .So-Not until we saw our kids with our own eyes did we believe they were really safe and sound- in that ...
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Difference between Pr. Simple and Pr. Continuous [migrated]

During one of my recent English lessons I have faced some problems with the strong understanding when to use the present simple or the present continuous. There are some examples of what I have met ...
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1answer
39 views

Sentences that do not contain the classic subject and predicate structure [duplicate]

I understand the classic definition of a sentence is one that contains a predicate and a subject, but is it okay to have shorter sentences that don't follow this structure for effect? For example, if ...
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1answer
28 views

Sentences with “participle clauses” [closed]

Are these sentences below grammatically correct and understandable? And which version of each example is more appropriate? 1- He is a bookworm, having lived first in Canada and then having moved ...
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2answers
47 views

Will vs Going to [duplicate]

I’m a bit baffled about these two structures: going to and will. Here’s an example of where I get confused: Liverpool’s players are known to be skilled. They ....... the match easily. A) will win. ...
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Is this a correct use of parallel structure?

I am not sure if this sentence is a correct usage of parallel structure: There is no electricity, no water supply, and no health centers in the area. We would say "There are no health centers", so ...
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2answers
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crashed out in practice for the Australian grand prix

An English dictionary gives the following example sentence: Schumacher crashed out in practice for the Australian grand prix. I'd like to know how to parse "crashed out in practice for the ...
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1answer
55 views

What does “Disturb not X” mean?

I already know what the word disturb means, but I do not understand what disturb not means. I’ve seen titles that start with this, like Disturb Not the Dream and Disturb Not the Sleep, etc. What does ...
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Grammatical name and function

What is the grammatical name and function of ...who finally broke down under the strain of waiting for rain" it was the women of the family who finally broke down under the strain of waiting for ...
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24 views

(Noun to verb np) structure and grammar [duplicate]

I can't understand the grammar and structure of following sentence: "YouTube to Remove Thousands of Videos Pushing Extreme Views" I think something is omitted, it should be: "YouTube is to remove..." ...
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“Instead of ʏᴏᴜʀ calling” vs “Instead of ʏᴏᴜ calling” [duplicate]

Which is better: Instead of your calling, maybe I should do it. Instead of you calling, maybe I should do it. I feel like the first one is the better choice here because instead of needs a gerund, ...
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1answer
65 views

“I know him ʙᴇɪɴɢ honest” vs “I know him ᴛᴏ ʙᴇ honest”

The intended original sentence before conversion is: I know that he is an honest man. I want to know about these two possible reformulated versions of that sentence that replace the original’s ...
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2answers
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Who is lost in thought in “I had no glimmer of what was in his mind, nor did he enlighten me, but sat lost in thought…”? [closed]

I'd like someone to clear up the sentence that seems ambiguous to me. It's from "The problem of the Thor Bridge" by Conan Doyle. I had no glimmer of what was in his mind, nor did he enlighten me, ...
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27 views

Is this correct to say? [duplicate]

"forced to make due with" I don't know it doesn't sound right to me, is it grammatically correct?
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1answer
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“such … as” in an attributive clause

Please help me understand the following sentence structure: More than half the roster, including such popular characters as Black Panther, Scarlett Witch, Star Lord, Spider-Man, and Doctor Strange ...
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3answers
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What are the meaning and grammar of “Crying isn't like you”? [closed]

Can I say that something is not like somebody like this: Crying isn’t like you. What is its meaning?
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1answer
44 views

How do you parse the sentence?

The original sentence: In this way, we have learned all that we know of the laws of astronomy, or of the habits of the social insects, let us say. Please let me make it simpler as below: In ...
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1answer
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For the expression “bumf**k, Egypt”, is “bumf**k” an adjective and “Egypt” a noun? [closed]

I'm asking about the structure of the expression. If the answer is YES, then what's the reason for the comma. Besides, which Egypt is meant, "The Arab Republic of Egypt" or that "region of Illinois", ...
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1answer
162 views

What is the grammatical structure of the expression “F*** you!” and its derivatives?

I heard that expression along with its derivatives so many times, in movies or otherwise, but I can't get it grammatically, meaning, does it stand for a complete sentence like "I will fuck you!" or "I ...
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2answers
109 views

In “You did me wrong”, is “wrong” an adverb or some other part of speech instead?

Consider: You did me wrong. In that sentence, is wrong an adverb or some other part of speech? I don’t understand the syntactic construction being used here.
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Comparison of equality used as Adjunct - As good/happy as

I came across this sentence in A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini: As happy as she was about this pregnancy, his expectation weighed on her. I was trying to parse this sentence and was ...
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1answer
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I envisage that it does not. Can the sentence exist?

The sentence is my answer to the question of whether robots will replace teachers in the future. I am not a linguist or a native speaker, therefore I cannot tell the truth. Personally, I speculate ...
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1answer
24 views

At one time operating vs At one time it operated

Since "at one time" is a time indicator, shouldn't the gerund "operating" be equivalent, while giving a better flow joining sentences? Or is it more confusing/improper? Preceding text of the same ...
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1answer
46 views

Why ”were” and not “was” in “and e’en to tell it ᴡᴇʀᴇ no easy task”?

I am reading a translation of Dante’s Inferno made by Cary in 1805. Here I cite the translator’s text for the opening of Canto I: In the midway of this our mortal life, I found me in a gloomy ...
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1answer
160 views

Grammatical name

What is the grammatical name and function of "The variety of vitamins and nutrients in green beans" help prevent many health problems
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1answer
48 views

Do I need whom in this sentence? [duplicate]

"One of the benefits of this is that it will eliminate gym anxiety if you have any because you are with someone whom you trust."
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1answer
73 views

Complex object grammar and other things [closed]

I've seen a number of different phrases in different books describing the action of closing a door, and I'm not quite sure that I fully understand the grammar behind them. For example: (1) [He] ...