Questions tagged [syntactic-analysis]

Parsing or syntactic analysis is the process of analysing a string of symbols, conforming to the rules of a formal grammar.

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What is a role of 'how' in 'How so many people' : [how][so many people] or [how so many people]?

I realize how so many people don't have those simple things that we so much take for granted. "how so many people don't have those simple things that we so much take for granted" is an ...
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Which is the best way to say “this is my life and my family's life we're talking about.”

A) "This is me and my family's life we're talking about." B) "This is my and my family's life we're talking about." C) "This is mine and my family's life we're talking about.&...
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29 views

A peculiar gerund construction

I am unsure how to phrase this as I am uncertain as to whether it is a point of grammar or one of style. In a book I am reading (by, admittedly, a quite scholarly author), the gerund is almost always ...
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Has the term “Hit the bricks” ever meant “go to bed”

I am from Iowa and I have heard the term "Hit the bricks" used in the same way as "hit the sack" or "hit the hay" in terms of going to bed. Recently a friend from ...
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Can the verb “ go” be a helping verb if it can be replaced by the verb to be or to become [closed]

For example : Cultural studies goes global. If yes . Please how can we analyse the phrases of this sentence in terms of their category and function
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What is “wherein clause” modifying?

The results of the niche equivalency showed a significant difference (p < 0.0001) between each clade in a two by two comparison: D. immaculatus–D. suweonensis: D = 0.147, I = 0.417; D. immaculatus–...
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Can somebody help me with syntactic analysis of this text?(more info in comments) [closed]

could somebody help me determine all the subjects and predicates in this text?(Not just verbs) Also which verbs are finite and which are non-finite. Would be really helpfull. Thanks for your time.
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Is it ever correct to say “if I be…” in present-day English?

We are taught that in "type 0" and "type 1" conditional sentences, the tense of the condition clause (aka the "if" clause) should always be the normal present tense, as ...
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Is it befitting to use “I would agree” in a formal writing?

Can we start off a paragraph with "I would agree" when we want to establish our perspective on a subject in a formal and academic writing? What is the difference between "I agree" ...
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2answers
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Direct speech sentences without leading “He said,”, “She said,”, etc

Note: The question at He nodded his head yes; she shook her head no does not answer this queestion because that question deals with a gesture that can be expressed fine without direct speech but in ...
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got confused with the structure of this sentence

I've been reading this movie review. Here is the link from the NewYorker. The part which confuses me is This fact renders him essentially neutered in the presence of Tony and his family and friends, ...
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Are the following sentences correct/idiomatic? [closed]

"I'll see you at the top of the x street/alley." "I'm at the bottom of the x street/alley." Or should we just say "at/around the corner of the x street"? Thank you
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What is the grammatical function of 'where to meet them' in this sentence?

What is the grammatical function of 'where to meet them' in the sentence: Tell us where to meet them. Is it an object of the verb? It is not a noun phrase and doesn't look like a typical object.
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How is this sentence formed: “The seniors make the freshers write practical files.” [duplicate]

How is this sentence constructed? The seniors make the freshers write practical files.
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omission of semantic subject

Toni Morrison began writing when she was in college, but she did not produce anything good enough to publish for many years. Her troubled marriage, divorce, and life as a single mother made it even ...
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Why doesn’t a verb’s indirect object have a preposition (like “to”) before it? [migrated]

I don’t understand the grammatical rules behind this sentence: It is not showing us the question. I need to represent it like this: It is not showing the question to us. Lexico doesn't have ...
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Is there any scenario in which we can use the present tense after “I wish…”?

Is the following sentence correct? "I really wish I don't see her again."
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“If not for his wide, thin lips, perpetually drawn in a single disapproving line, she would have liked him too.” [duplicate]

I am not sure about the grammatical correctness of the above sentence. I am writing a fictional short story and this sentence is part of the narrative. My friend says it should be "If not for his ...
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1answer
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Adverbial complements for [I listened to …] vs [I worked as …]

(1) I listened to the lecture at school. --> The lecture was listened to by me at school. (2) I worked as a secretary at the company. --> A secretary was worked as by me at the company. Both listen ...
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Meaning: “So, too is (that)”

What does the beginning of the sentence mean? It is my first encounter with a "So, too is (that)" structure. I would gladly learn what it means and how it is grammatically constructed alike. In ...
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1answer
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no more… than / never any more… than

What are the meanings of these two sentences? Sex is no more boring than work is. There was never any more maturity than there is now. Cambridge Dictionary notes: We use no more … than or not any ...
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1answer
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Function of the ing-forms in this sentence?

I'm having a hard time figuring out what the exact function of "fascinating" and "working" is in the following sentence: "This song deals with the most important concerns fascinating people working ...
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how explain awkward sentence structure to non-native english speaker

THis is the title of a medical paper. I'm trying to explain why to non-native english speaker that its awkward (to me anyway). Any suggestions? Different measures for the cochlear parameters and its ...
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2answers
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Can we use “setting” to mean “the end” of something?

"Setting" can be used to talk about the end of the day when the sun goes down, as in "In Ramadan, fasters must abstain from eating and drinking from the break of dawn until the setting of the sun." ...
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Which preposition is correct?

"That question should be asked to the teacher, not me." OR "That question should be asked from the teacher, not me."
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Grammar of introductions

If I were to say "I am John Smith, New York University Alumnus" or "John Smith, RAF" as an introduction, what would the latter half of the sentence be grammatically speaking? I was thinking it could ...
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1answer
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Confusion in understanding statements

Petya and Vasya are competing with each other in a new interesting game as they always do. At the beginning of the game Petya has to come up with an array of N positive integers. Sum of all elements ...
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Usage of comma with “thanks”

Which of the following sentences is correct, and why? Thank you Bob for scheduling the call. I look forward to speaking with you tomorrow at 4pm. Thank you, Bob for scheduling the call. I look ...
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What is the difference between the following prepositions:

"He is the best player of the country." and "He is the best player in the country." When should we use "of" and when should we use "in"?
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1answer
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syntax analysis help: are objects verb complement)

I am wondering what are you gonna do In the above sentense, what is the function of subordinate clause what are you gonna do? I am leaning toward object, but maybe it is verb complement? Is there a ...
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What is the difference between the adjectives “content” and contented"? [duplicate]

To me the difference is that if the adjective comes after the noun we should say "content". As in "Jake is very content." But if it precedes the nouns, we should say "contented". As in "Jake is a very ...
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“Such a, such the, such” rules

1- Mr Andrew is ......man that you can trust him. a) such a. b) such an. C) such the. 2- Mr Andrew is......man that you can trust. a)such an b)such the c) such I am a bit confused, ...
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The use of which verb is correct?

"3 generations of stupidity is enough." OR "3 generations of stupidity are enough."? P.S. in the book Grammar in Use (advanced) the author suggests that when the complement is a singular noun phrase (...
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Do we use a preposition after the verb “signal”?

"He signaled me to drive away." OR "He signaled to me to drive away."
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How many question marks and put where in this sentence? You should consider a memoir, Bob. How 'bout the end of all, or the road ahead

The sentence is How 'bout 'The End of All'Ø or 'The road ahead'Ø where Ø is a stop or zero punctuation.
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Please check grammar and structure! [closed]

The bar chart presents the number of male and female who did regular activity in Australia in 2010. The information,according six different age groups by gender,are illustrated in percentage.
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1answer
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Is this sentence missing an article?

But the Laemmle name had not died; it is now associated with exhibition, thus bringing the Laemmle saga full circle since it was in exhibition that Carl began in 1906. (source: City of Dreams: The ...
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Is this a right way to use “to no avail”? [closed]

But to not his avail,they didn't pay him any attention.
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The noun form of the verb “itch” can be either “itch” or “itching”, according to all reliable dictionaries. But is there any difference between them?

The following examples are from the Cambridge online dictionary. Is it possible to use "itching" for the first and "itch" for the second sentence (can we use these two words interchangeably as nouns)? ...
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Does a noun clause as a subject sound natural in modern days?

President Lincoln wrote, "That I once had the confidence of the people in Sangamon, is sufficiently evident." Is this type of sentence construct common in today's English usage?
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is sentence start with subject modifier considered valid?

A sentence popped up in my mind, goes: “No longer a pain is that time in the cell, as he walk out from the jail." And I am pretty sure I've seen something similar to this sentence, but I cannot tell ...
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3answers
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What's the difference between the following sentences:

"The door is locked. It must require a password." And "The door is locked. It must have to require a password."
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Syntactic , semantic and change the meaning

He set the apples down and took her by (the arm) or (by arm). If I used (by arm), are syntactic semantics acceptable? Does the meaning change?
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“Fail though I did”

I have found the following sentence : Fail though I did, I would not abandon my goal. The adverbial clause "Fail though I did" (instead of, "Even though I failed") seems quite stylistic. But what'...
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Plural subject vs. Singular question

If the question "Dear school teachers, are you a good student?" correct? I have addressed teachers as plural, whereas the question
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“Because + noun” : a new usage [duplicate]

I encountered with these sentences : No work tomorrow because holidays!  Of course evolution is true, because science. "BECAUSE + NOUN" is a new usage to me. I think 'because' has been used here as ...
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When your symptoms suggest that “it's probable” that you have a particular disease, what word do we usually use in English to suggest so?

For example, "you have hyperinflation in both your lungs, which is in favor of asthma." Or "you have hyperinflation in both your lungs, which is suspected asthma." Do these sounds natural? If not, ...
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Grammar analysis: why is “Fufu” in the following sentence object complement rather than direct object

I called my pug Fufu: subject...object...object complement(Introducing English Grammar, p.93) Yet if I say: I give my pug some water. then pug would be indirect object and some water would be ...
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2answers
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Is it correct to use “congratulate” for someone's birthday?

"I'm not going to congratulate her birthday because we're not on speaking terms"? And if not, what do we say? Thanks a lot.
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“It's been a blast working with you guys for 5 years now.” or “It's been a blast having worked with you guys for 5 years now.”?

I think both are correct, but which one is better-structured and more suited for a formal context?

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