Questions tagged [syntactic-analysis]

Parsing or syntactic analysis is the process of analysing a string of symbols, conforming to the rules of a formal grammar.

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'More than I could have hoped for'

Consider the below sentence. Context: The speaker came from a very poor background, and has recently received a promotion to become the CEO of a major company; for that reason the speaker is over the ...
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the use of "as" in "as likely to'

He, therefore, in proposing a great variety of employments, in manufactures or the care of plants and animals, allows for one third of women as likely to have a taste for masculine pursuits, one third ...
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Does the term USING in the sentence act as gerund or participle? [closed]

Whether they are good or bad, we can draw a comparison using their behaviour! Is using a gerund/present participle in this sentence?
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English grammar "the something for something" [migrated]

I found on a bean can the phrase "the italian for healthy taste". I'm wondering if it's an English way to say or it's just a wrong sentence?
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How to use possessive for joined and separate ownerships? [duplicate]

How should I create possessives (for joined and separate ownerships) if each individual isn't a noun but a pronoun? Knowing that: Peter and Dave's car means Peter and Dave own one car. And that Peter'...
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What are the grammatical name and function of ‘five months later’?

What is the grammatical name and function of five months later as used in the following sentence? Five months later, Steve strained himself to mould some more blocks.
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Which is correct? 90 hub or 90 hubs? [closed]

When should I use 90 hub vs 90 hubs? I am trying to name a place and I don't know which is the correct 90 hubs or 90 hub?
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Adverb position(by deliberately doing.....)

I have searched the definition of contrarily to know its usage. I found this A child who behaves contrarily behaves badly by deliberately doing the opposite of what is wanted or expected. I ...
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Relative pronoun qualifies one or more pronouns?

In the sentence "I have a cat and dogs who are dumb", does "who are dumb" qualify only the dogs or does it qualify of the dogs and the cat? Or is it ambiguous? Depending on the ...
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“Would not have” + past participle in a real reflection [closed]

Here is the situation: If there had been an apple, I wouldn’t have eaten it. ...is understood to mean: There wasn’t an apple; I therefore didn’t eat it. Building on this, can we use the imaginary ...
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Grammatical correctness of "With all things vampire"

I came across this sentence: "That was the year the Twilight movie was going to come out, and the kids were agog with all things vampire." — Shelley Dorrill (From Merriam-Webster's ...
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Possessives with gerunds

When a phrase, such as “doing something” is used used as a noun, I understand it becomes a gerund phrase. When it includes a pronoun subject, the phrase becomes a clause, in which the pronoun ...
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"Not just [he/him], but [she/her] is leaving this year"?

How do I correctly write sentences like these: "Not just [he/him], but [she/her] is leaving this year"? I'm unsure whether to use an object or subject pronoun. I've come to learn that in ...
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Another tricky subject-verb agreement question (for me)

I was hoping someone could break down the following sentence that I have written into its subject, verb, and predicate parts: This is why supporting demand-side policies is a less-risky proposition. ...
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How to properly read sentences of the type: "a and b that c" [migrated]

There are a couple of examples of these sentences, but the main question is, whether to read this as: a and [b that c] or [a and b] that c An example would be: The grass and roses that are red. ...
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"Of all the students, none [is/are] as attentive as he is"? "she asks all 5 of them, none [knows/know] the answer"? [duplicate]

In the sentence "I asked all 5 of them, none [knows/know] the answer", should I use the plural or singular verb? For reference, I found this website that explains it: https://editorsmanual....
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What’s the meaning of ‘stand hacking‘? [duplicate]

I'm trying to understand this sentence: For hours I stood hacking at the icy ground. Which is in this excerpt of Viktor Frankl’s 1947 book, Man's Search for Meaning: Another time we were at work in ...
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Is ‘just’ an adjective in ‘just anyone’?

Given this sentence: Nina wouldn’t give her phone number to just anyone. I’ve checked several dictionaries (Oxford, Longman, Cambridge, Macmillan) for the word just from the example above. It looks ...
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Why is the sentence "Wall-to-wall carpets in every room is their dream" acceptable?

I saw this sentence in the CoGEL(Quirk et al). 15.16 Verbless clause: Wall-to-wall carpets in every room is their dream. Question: Why is this awkward sentence acceptable? It's obvious that it ...
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1 answer
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Do we hyphen ordinal numbers written in letters? [closed]

Knowing that we hyphen compound numbers under 100. Do we do the same for the ones used for ranks? Every website I've looked at teaches how to hyphen cardinal numbers (67, 82, 34,...) but does not say ...
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How should I hyphen decimal numbers written in letters (that contains the word "point" and "and")?

All the wesites I've looked at says to hyphen numbers when you are describing compound numbers between 21 and 99 (except 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90). A compound number is any number that consists ...
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What is the predicate part of the sentence in an "X is ___ed" pattern?

Basically, this derives from an NLP problem I am facing in software development. NLP stands for "Natural Language Processing", and it is ML dependent. Since it depends on ML, it is ...
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present participle in there be sentences [duplicate]

"There is a man sitting under the tree. " How to explain the "sitting" grammatically?
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3 votes
2 answers
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Is "none" when used alone without antecedent singular or plural (for context, I'm talking about people): "None [are/is] here"?

I know that "none of [...]" can be both singular or plural, but when I use it alone in a sentence, without the "of" and without any other nouns, can it be both singular and plural ...
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What part of a sentence is "regarding X" classified as?

In the process of learning Japanese, I've been doing some grammar analysis on sentence structure (across languages), Eg. subject, object, etc. I've come across something I haven't heard of before: the ...
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Is a 'to' needed here between the auxiliary verb and the main verb? [duplicate]

So this post just popped on a meme site. In the comments a discussion arose is the second meaning grammatically correct. If not, what is the closest correct formulation? Perhaps including some of the ...
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How can I distinguish between supplements and modifiers as proposed in The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (CGEL)?

In CGEL, the authors use the term 'adjunct' as an umbrella term to cover an element that is either modifier or supplement. On page 1350, the authors explain the properties of supplements to ...
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Should I use "who" or "whom" in "The main problem of Argentina comes from whom has taken office."? [duplicate]

Should I use who or whom in this sentence? The main problem of Argentina comes from whom has taken office. My logic I know that whom is an object pronoun, that whom has taken the office is the ...
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Use of 'Get' in a particular type of sentences

I just want to know whether the sentences below are grammatically correct or not – His / that attitude gets me irked. Is the use of word 'get' acceptable in such cases? His / that attitude irks me. ...
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1 answer
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Syllabify geology [closed]

How do we syllabify the word "geology? Ge ol o gy or ge o lo gy. If A is right then why is B wrong? If B so then why A? Also 2. laboratory.
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2 votes
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Is it okay to say "Captains Carter and Marvel"? [duplicate]

An artist wrote "Captains Carter and Marvel" to refer to both Captain Carter and Captain Marvel together. Is it okay to use the title only once and make it plural when there are multiple ...
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As if as though

I am having a problem identifing which gramatical function as if (as though, like) has As far as I know After linking verbs, we have noun/ noun phrase/ noun clause and adjective/ adjective phrase ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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Describing multiple choices with two options in a particular order in one statement

Say I have three options (or choices if prefer) , A,B and C but one must decide on either A or later having the option of B and C (you cannot choose B or C straight away, only decide that you don't ...
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Omitting a pronoun from a cleft sentence

I believe this is a cleft sentence: It was 10:18 ᴀᴍ when it happened. However, I cannot explain why the pronoun when can’t be removed when you rewrite that sentence into this one: When it (=the ...
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In the pattern "I am also <adjective>," does "also" modify the verb "am" or the adjective?

My family and I saw the following phrase: The also relevant part is . . . We all agreed that it was kind of an awkward sounding construction. But we disagreed on whether it was grammatically correct....
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1 answer
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How to explain this sentence structure

He later admitted having seen the dish on the menu... Would I break down the form of this as follows: admitted (verb, past participle of admit) + having (verb to have + -ing) + seen (verb past ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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Is “whose” a true relative pronoun? (and request for the full list of relative pronouns)

The internet is indeed a tangled web, and since anyone can write anything, there is a lot of conflicting information about what is and isn’t a relative pronoun. We all agree that who, whom, that, and ...
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Do the Phrases "Entitled to" and "Eligible for" Mean the Same Thing? [closed]

It comes up in the Supreme Court Couse Bacerra vs. Empire Health Foundation. Here is some example context: "Person x is ENTITLED TO medical assistance" and "Person x is ELIGIBLE FOR ...
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The word "new" may be an Adverb or an Adjective

I am trying to understand this sentence where the word 'new' can both be an adverb and also an adjective. Can someone please help me explain the ambiguous structure and the meaning conveyed in the ...
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Can "coincide" be use transitively?

The New York Times today has an unusual use of "coincide": NYT Looking at common-cold coronaviruses, some researchers have predicted that SARS-CoV-2 will become a seasonal winter infection ...
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3 votes
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As powerful as black holes are

Recently, I've come across some "as+adj+as" patterns that don't fit into the famous "as+adj+as" pattern. Like, he is as old as me. The new patters are as follow: As powerful as ...
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Is this ordering of words wrong "make transparent [object]"? [closed]

I was scrolling around and found the post Long sentence between "make" and adjective. The OP is concerned that in the following sentence the bolded part is too long as an object (I think), ...
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1 answer
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Is this list syntax correct?

I saw the following sentence earlier: We’ll help you win across every channel, every format and on your terms. I interpret that as one of the following: We’ll help you win; [across every channel], [...
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-1 votes
1 answer
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Usage of "even when" in a sentence [duplicate]

Does the meaning of this sentence change if “even when” is placed in the beginning? Removing the word “even” gives the sentence clear meaning, does adding it change the meaning?? Larceny occurs even ...
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How to interpret 'when' in this sentence?

I have a question about how to interpret 'when' in the bold-lettered sentence. Below is the context and the sentence (from Beginners by Raymond Carver). “It gets worse,” Terri said. “He shot himself ...
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Which is correct: 'a fear of never doing something' or 'a fear never to do something'?

In a story my students are currently reading, a mother who is an alcoholic and has a daughter with speech disorder does not ask the social services for help because she fears she might very well never ...
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2 answers
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Natural Sentence and Unnatural Sentence [closed]

I think that since Tom is a student, he cannot buy expensive meat. I don't think that Tom can buy expensive meat since he is a student. Since Tom is a student, I don't think that he can buy ...
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3 votes
2 answers
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"There are fish of every hue." For different kinds of fish, should fish be in plural form here?

In the Caribbean waters, there are fish of every hue. Since one is talking about different kinds of fish, should fish be in marked plural form (fishes) here?
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1 vote
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"Looking forward to watching me play" vs "watching me playing" [duplicate]

We were reading a piece of text and my English teacher told us that the sentence: "For sure, my fans are looking forward to watching me play today." is wrong, and that it should instead be ...
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1 vote
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(Rather than) as a conjunction

It is said that, as a conjunction, the two constructions on each side of (rather than) must be parallel. So can this phrase join two sentences like this? (I know there are better ways of doing it) I ...
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