Questions tagged [syntactic-analysis]

Parsing or syntactic analysis is the process of analysing a string of symbols, conforming to the rules of a formal grammar.

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4
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1answer
424 views

What is the exact meaning of this excerpt from Chapter 52 of “Pride and Prejudice ” by Jane Austen?

While elaborating on the arrangement between Mr. Darcy and Mr. Wickham in her letter to her niece Elizabeth Bennet, Mrs. Gardiner mentions the following: ...His debts are to be paid, amounting, I ...
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1answer
213 views

“Of” used to say which specific thing belonging to a more general type you are referring to

"Of" can be used to describe the relationship between two close things, one thing being kind of an explanatory element. And gerund is frequently used. For example: The idea of getting into the cave ...
2
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1answer
19 views

question on adverbs (away, apart)

I wanted to ask a question about the adverbs away and apart. The villages are miles apart. The exam is only two weeks away. It is three days apart. It is five kilometers away/apart. Away and apart ...
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1answer
56 views

Is the tense of the latter part of the sentence correct?

"He couldn't foresee devoting himself to anything other than that passionate desire, even if the fire eventually burns him down." Is 'burns him down' correct? The speaker is okay with the fire burning ...
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1answer
31 views

Sentence pattern

She was obedient to her elders. In this sentence, how do you label the phrase "to her elders?" The subject of this sentence is 'She', the verb is 'was'. complement is 'obedient', what is to her elders'...
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1answer
573 views

‘To be concentrated’ usage

Recently I have heard many people say that somebody needs ‘to be concentrated’ on something. Am I right in saying that this is being used incorrectly?
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3answers
10k views

Is 'this this' correct?

The ability to echo words and still make a meaningful statement has always bugged me. Take this example sentence: "Thank you for bringing this issue to my attention. We will take care of this this ...
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1answer
299 views

What is a phrasal preposition?

I was reading an article by GrammarBook.com when the moderators used a term I had never heard of. Out of is a phrasal preposition. What is exactly a phrasal preposition? Is it when a preposition ...
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1answer
52 views

How should I correctly write this question?

"Can you provide documentation stating the noise levels, so that we are able to show compliance if we get audited?" Even though this is a question, I feel like the question mark at the end doesn't ...
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1answer
46 views

How do you make a phrase possessive?

I just read a post where someone said "That's a friend of mine's house." My first thought was, "mine's" is a double possessive! The friend owns the house, and the one posting the comment owns the ...
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1answer
55 views

How to end essay gracefully using this sentence?

The sentence I currently have is "I am grateful to be introduced to (event), as it has significantly altered my paradigm and the way I want to live my life." The issue I have is finding a better way ...
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1answer
97 views

Who does “ I” refer to or who do “ I” refer to? [closed]

While framing a question, many teachers are doubtful when they are testing their students' comprehension of a given passage. For example, read the following paragraph and answer the following ...
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1answer
62 views

being usages dilemma

I've read in BBC that we use use "being" as a verb-ing. BBC has listed two kinds of usage; what I want to learn about here is the "preposition + verb-ing" usage. It has been said that "being + past ...
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3answers
193 views

How to parse the grammar of a sentence that appears to have two tensed verbs

This question came from a student of mine - he wanted to know how to parse the grammar of this sentence, which appears to be simple but clearly is not: Peter seems to have found his glasses. ...
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2answers
114 views

How do I fix this run-on sentence?

How would I fix the bolded sentence to not be a run-on sentence? It says what I want it to, but I would like a better structure or choice of words. While I studied at ABC Community College I worked ...
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1answer
45 views

A sentence structure that reads easier and more natural

Here are 2 possible structures of the same sentence (including extra sentence for context). Seriously, what is up with this unnatural behavior of hers?! She started acting like this ever since ...
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0answers
26 views

Can the article “a” always be used in place of the number one when making compound adjectives or adjectival nouns? [closed]

If I had two million, I’m a two-millionaire. If I had one million, I’m a one-millionaire. If I had a million, am I an a-millionaire? On a slightly similar topic: https://www.grammarly.com/blog/hyphen-...
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2answers
155 views

Can present tense be used without an adverb like “usually” or “always” when describing a habit?

I understand we use the present tense when we describe habits. "My dog always sleeps under the bed." "It usually sits on the sofa." Does it make sense if I leave 'always' and 'usually' out? as in ...
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3answers
76 views

What is the grammatical topic of this shortening technique?

Extracted from English cloze test: .....these virtual selves exist in the same online spaces that many people use every day. And this is a new and unfamiliar phenomenon that some people might ...
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2answers
60 views

Can “either” be used as an adverb, and if so does it require, allow, or prohibit the use of a comma when so used?

Can either be used as an adverb, and if so, does it always take a comma when it is? And is the following statement correct in congruence with my question? I believe there is some mistake that I don't ...
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1answer
51 views

"The economic and health [crisis | crises] can be tackled together.”

Is this sentence correct with plural crises: The economic and health crises can be tackled together. or should it instead be this one with a singular crisis: The economic and health crisis can be ...
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1answer
2k views

Commas around 'Too' [duplicate]

I see it both ways with a comma before a sentence-ending 'too' and a comma on each side of 'too' when it's the second word in a sentence. Are these commas really needed? Would you personally use them? ...
3
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2answers
108 views

Adjectival order: “a style appropriate for” or “an appropriate style for”

I would like to understand the correct grammatical order in the sentence, In your essay, you must use grammatically correct sentences with accurate spelling and punctuation in a style appropriate ...
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2answers
32 views

What part of speech is 'stumble' in this sentence?

I saw this sentence somewhere: 'This episode sees the heroine stumble upon a body.'. I know 'stumble' is a verb, but which part of the verb is being used here? I don't think I really know how to ...
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0answers
51 views

“And if labour exploitation was not possible, to marginalise Indians[.]”

In North America, the fur trade during the colonial and early U.S. periods was a major source of wealth production. Colonial governments sought to exploit the labour of Indigenous Peoples. And if ...
2
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1answer
73 views

Some clause structure about “SOURCE said that CLAUSE”?

Suppose we have the following sentences: John believes that people are good. Steve knows that France is in Europe. Now, in these sentences we have some clause (e.g. People are good, France is ...
3
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1answer
71 views

What do you call sentence structures with unnecessary pronouns? [duplicate]

Examples: "The father, he was very angry." instead of "The father was very angry" "The cup, it was overflowing." instead of "The cup was overflowing" I have seen it in dramatic texts, especially ...
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2answers
51 views

regarding the correct/incorrect use of the comma [duplicate]

There is a building which is taller than all others known as the Burj Khalifa. Is a comma necessary after "others", which makes the sentence: There is a building which is taller than all others, ...
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0answers
131 views

Imperative sentence patterns …

Please let me ask you native or very well-trained Eglish speakers if there’s some patterns, rules, or formulas in regards of an imperative sentence’s structure. For example, I was reading this ...
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1answer
47 views

What does 'fungus-growing' mean?

Renowned Swiss entomologist Martin Luscher described the mounds of this fungus-growing species as being as much as 16 feet tall, 16 feet in diameter at their base, and with a cement-like wall of ...
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0answers
23 views

Meaning shift with the change of a conjunction location

I am in a pickle... Is there any difference in the meanings of these two sentences? To me, the first sentence feels a bit ambiguous. Defining search terms can be misleading until a critical ...
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1answer
170 views

I have got a car (Present Simple or Present Perfect?)

I was taught that ‘have got’ means 'possess, own, or hold' and you can also use ‘have’ [Present Simple] I have got a car./I have a car I haven't got a car./I don't have a car Have I got a car?/...
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0answers
40 views

What part of grammar does this kind of syntax error pertain to?

"One of the most beautiful set of lyrics I have ever come across and sang." OR "One of the most beautiful set of lyrics I have ever come across and sung." I'm aware that the past participle is sung ...
3
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1answer
102 views

How the west was won - Is this a noun phrase?

I'm trying to determine what the following types of phrases (in bold within the sentences below) would be called. I want to say they're noun phrases, but I may be wrong. To me, these resolve to ...
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0answers
17 views

Constituent Structure

David is the best player [in the world]. is PP in the world an immediate constituent of the NP the best player in the world [is [the best player [in the world]]] or is it an immediate constituent ...
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4answers
5k views

Why is “dark” an adverb in “dark blue”?

The sky is dark blue. Source: BBC English Catherine: The sky is dark blue. The sky is dark blue. Finn: So, is blue an adjective or adverb? Catherine: It’s an adjective. Blue is ...
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1answer
1k views

Can colours be used as an adverb?

I am trying to understand which syntactic role the word red has in this sentence: We could colour the walls red. My first thought was it being an adverb, but I have never heard someone saying ...
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7answers
2k views

Can a noun work as an adjective, and the adjective as a noun?

Hazel Eyes I found the following paragraph in the guycounseling.com blog article “Hazel Eyes: Learn Why People with Greenish Eye Color are Rare!”, containing the two words “hazel eyes”: Hazel eyes ...
2
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1answer
64 views

How can “of me doing something” be grammatically correct? What grammar rule is this? [duplicate]

The first book on my list has actually been recommended to me like multiple times over the years of me doing BookTube. I found that sentence in my English book, and the last part where it reads of ...
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1answer
40 views

resulting from or resulted from?

Which one of these sentences is correct? For an academic paper The third theme resulting from focus group interviews was cultural barriers. The third theme resulted from focus group interviews was ...
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1answer
45 views

What part of speech is “almost” when applied to an adjective? [closed]

If I say that "the box is almost flat" what part of speech is "almost"? I can't say "the box is almost", so it does not appear to be an adjective itself. It seems to be a word that modifies the ...
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2answers
66 views

Subject/Object Confusion in The Silmarillion [duplicate]

In Tolkein's "The Silmarillion", page 216 of the chapter "Of Túrin Turambar", the following is written: "[...] this Wildman was the Mormegil of Nargothrond, whom rumour said was the son of Húrin ...
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4answers
166 views

How can this sentence be correct?

I read the following sentence in a book and could not in any way justify the correctness of the sentence. Please help: Most states impose limitations on the authority of the legislature to borrow ...
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2answers
43 views

Singular or plural after Subject + modal + base form of the verb

For example: A well thought-out system streamlines operation, improves work process, reduces data redundancy..... If can is added to the sentence, should the following verb be singular or plural?...
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1answer
45 views

“such … as” in an attributive clause

Please help me understand the following sentence structure: More than half the roster, including such popular characters as Black Panther, Scarlett Witch, Star Lord, Spider-Man, and Doctor Strange ...
2
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1answer
55 views

Why the comma is used in the sentence by Jane Austen [duplicate]

I cannot understand the usage of comma after "chapel" in this sentence: Its long, damp passages, its narrow cells and ruined chapel, were to be within her daily reach, and she could not entirely ...
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0answers
26 views

Explain what happened on the meeting today [closed]

I am middle level English speaker/writer and I am working for international company. My native language is Bulgarian and I have never studied English professionally. Pretty much all I know is from the ...
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1answer
27 views

Help regarding the subject in a sentence

Could anyone please tell me what would be the subject in the following sentence which I have taken from the National Geographic website: Providing pools of water for frogs when other water is ...
7
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2answers
8k views

“I had been done that” Is this correct?

I teach freshmen English in inner-city Baltimore, and I often get the following: Teacher : Did you complete the homework? Student : I had been done that! I have not been able to give a ...
2
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1answer
88 views

Verb transitivity in sentences with dummy subjects or with prepositions that look like dummy subjects

Suppose we put in play the rule that lay is used transitively and lies is used intransitively. How do you analyze constructions such as – Where the responsibility (lies/lay) has yet to be ...