Questions tagged [synonyms]

A synonym is a word that means the same, or almost the same thing, as another word. This tag is for asking about pairs of words. If you're requesting a synonym, please use the ‘single-word-request’ tag.

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What is a word for someone who sees themself as ‘unlovable’?

I’m doing some character work and I was wondering if anyone could find a word that means ‘someone who feels unlovable’ or ‘believes themself unworthy of having their love returned’. I'm looking for ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
56 views

What’s the meaning of “Substance” [closed]

What’s the meaning of Substance in this phrase: James had never served in the medical community, and his strength was substance rather than management of a large organization.
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-2 votes
0 answers
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Why use a less common word when communicating with foreigners? [closed]

I am English. When communicating with those who speak some, but not great, English.... I find myself using less commonly used words when I might otherwise use a more common English word with a ...
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What's the etymology for the term "resilvering" as used in computer file systems like hardware RAID, btrfs, ZFS, etc?

Hardware systems like traditional RAID, or modern software systems like ZFS, btrfs, etc. Are used for redundancy (and performance) of the storage of data. E.g. if you have 6 drives with ZFS, you can ...
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9 votes
5 answers
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Accessible as in web accessibility

In web development the term accessibility is used when working with features such as screen readers. When talking about accessibility the wording sometimes makes it unclear whether one is referring to ...
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0 votes
3 answers
60 views

Can ''anecdote'' be synonymous with ''detail'' or ''small point''? [closed]

As in, would it be correct to write something like: It is simply anecdotal that I didn't finish college? Further, can it be used in this sense in the form of a question? E.g., This is only an ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Synonym for "too optimistic"

In research paper I use the following two sentences: However, this is too optimistic definition since the allowable range of perturbations is restricted to diagonal matrices. However, this ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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What's the meaning of "so in"?

I couldn't find anything about "so in" in my research on Google. I heard people say it. And today I saw that on a Facebook post. So here's the context- You want long hair but short hair is ...
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12 votes
12 answers
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What's another word for agreeing with another person just for the sake of it?

Let's assume two people A and B are in an argument, when A accuses B of some wrongdoing, which B denies. A while after, B, for the sake of pretending to have a moral high ground (for thinking of ...
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0 votes
0 answers
26 views

"load the entire partition" or "load the whole partition"?

I'm translating some technical docs about distributed databases into English and I cannot decide which of the following sentences is correct or more natural in English? To modify a single record, the ...
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0 votes
1 answer
33 views

Synonym for Dauntingness

Looking for a synonym for dauntingness that's less a of a mouthful. Something that retains the meaning of "the quality of being terrifying or demoralizing" Example 1: Her ability to cause ...
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16 votes
5 answers
5k views

Thieves who rob dead bodies on the battlefield

There are plenty of synonyms in English for thieves. I'm looking for a word or expression that describes people who rob dead bodies on the battlefield. In the novel Les Misérables, by Hugo, Mr. ...
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1 vote
0 answers
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Erstwhile, meanwhile, and _?

If past is to present as erstwhile is to meanwhile, then present is to future as meanwhile is to thingwhile. What is the actual word that thing in the above statement refers to? Sometimes you hear ...
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1 vote
3 answers
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Synonym/alternative for "rhetorical kill shot"?

The phrase "rhetorical kill shot" means clever persuasion with words that immediately incapacitates the rhetorical opponent. Sometimes that phrase is simplified to just "kill shot"....
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1 vote
1 answer
102 views

Inclusive replacement for gentleman/lady

All, I recently misgendered an individual by referring to them as a gentleman rather than a lady. Regardless of whether an individual is cisgender or transgender, it would be useful to have an ...
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1 vote
3 answers
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Is the verb ‘recollect’ used in American English? How is it different from ‘remember’?

I (American English) am a plaintiff in a lawsuit taking place in Malta (UK English) that involves some British people as well as some Americans. When cross-examining a British person, many of his ...
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0 votes
0 answers
29 views

Is it correct to say that "sympathy" is a special case of "empathy"? [duplicate]

empathy = to understand someone else's feeling sympathy = to share someone's sorry/sad feeling In case of "empathy", one can understand someone's happy & sad feelings, while in "...
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1 vote
1 answer
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What's an alternative term for a "dry lake"?

I need to succinctly and more-or-less poetically describe a dry lake. As in, a lake that is no longer a lake proper, cuz it is no longer full of water. "It was at the bottom of a dry lake." ...
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-1 votes
2 answers
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Looking for a word that describes a polished résumé

I'm looking for a word you would use to describe a résumé that is "shiny" or "polished." For instance, if somebody went to say Stanford and then worked at NASA, their résumé would ...
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0 votes
0 answers
30 views

Is "head data" a true alternative to "header data"?

Our software uses the term "head data" for which I think should be called "header data". If I look up the German translation "Kopfdaten" on Leo, I only get "header ...
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1 vote
0 answers
39 views

"a bit" vs. "some"

Disclaimer: I'm a German native. I'm working on some software with a coworker from US. He just sent a message saying "if we decide to actually publish this as a real package, I'd like to clean it ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
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What is a more formal synonym for "getting the job"?

Example sentence: [X] has become a standard threshold in the industry that [Y] has to cross to "get the job". I would also not mind to get some other suggestions, since the overall ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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Synonymous terms for a "reciprocal interaction / incorporation" [closed]

How does one define, succinctly, an interaction between two objects A and B where ideas from A are used to improve B and vice versa? Thanks.
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0 votes
0 answers
58 views

Difference between roaring 20s and raging 20s?

One article A recession in America by 2024 looks likely from The Economist has a subtitle named: From the roaring to the raging 2020s From Google's online Dictionary(which is from Oxford): roaring ...
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0 votes
0 answers
59 views

Does the word "lecture" have a negative connotation?

In literature for young adults, I've noticed "lecture" is generally associated with groans and some overbearing adult ranting monotonously and repetitively. It's synonymous to admonishment ...
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-1 votes
2 answers
48 views

What is the word to express 'remove the need for'?

Creating a spare disk will remove the need for more disk space. What is the replacement for 'remove the need for'?
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7 votes
5 answers
2k views

What is the word to express the fact that 'it will not require doing something'?

Creating a spare disk will 'x' the need for more disk space. What is the replacement for 'x' — I can think of 'prevent', 'negate', 'skip', but I am looking for a better word to convey that 'it will ...
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  • 173
0 votes
1 answer
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need an idiom or phrase that means that the same event resulted (or results) in contrasting outcomes for 2 different inividuals

The sentence, as it now stands, is: "The bizarre events and offbeat personalities of an acid-fueled summer push two high school lifeguards in opposite directions." The part in italics is the ...
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0 answers
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Is there a term for "adverb verb"s and/or "redundant adverb verb"s?

This is a meta question of this one: How can I omit adverbs to impart a strong feeling? Like the original question, I'm trying to find some tool/list/book that helps one convert "adverb verb"...
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0 votes
3 answers
117 views

need an idiom or phrase that means "you're up early"

I am writing a screenplay and one of the characters picks up the phone and says "you're up early" but I need something to replace it. It doesn't have to be a real idiom or commonly used ...
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7 votes
3 answers
1k views

Is there any difference between "congenial" and "genial"?

As the question implies, I'm interested in only the linguistic distinction between the two words I've listed. I've looked up these two words on some online dictionaries. After some searching, I've ...
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0 votes
0 answers
7 views

Is there an English synonym for 'temporary attached' to a different group?

Are there words in English that are synonyms for temporary attached? For instance in the sentence: I will be temporarily attached to the XYZ group for two weeks, to perform task ABC. Note that this ...
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1 vote
1 answer
21 views

Are "adaptiveness" and "adaptability" interchangeable?

Here are the definitions for the words according to Cambridge dictionary: Adaptiveness - the quality of being able to change to suit different condition Flexibility and adaptiveness are important ...
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1 vote
0 answers
38 views

Is there an English synonym for 'temporarily-attached'? [duplicate]

Are there words in English that are synonyms for temporarily-attached? For instance in the sentence: I will be temporarily attached to the XYZ group for two weeks. Note that this question is different ...
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3 votes
0 answers
60 views

How should I understand the nuances between "astringent" and "acerbic"

I keep on getting these two words mixed up in my head. How should I understand the nuances that distinguish "astringent" and "acerbic"? Is there ever a reason to use one over the ...
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0 votes
0 answers
16 views

What are the subtle differences between the four sentences about "leave"? [duplicate]

He leaves for Japan next week. He is leaving for Japan next week. He will leave for Japan next week. He is going to leave for Japan next week. Though I know all the four sentences are correct, and ...
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  • 2,660
0 votes
1 answer
95 views

Closest equivalent of "bless you" for coughing [closed]

There is no English equivalent of "bless you" for coughing. Some friends and I would like to use a phrase for "bless you" for coughing amongst ourselves. What would an appropriate ...
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0 votes
2 answers
61 views

More formal way of saying "fighting until the end"

I'm currently working on a history essay and said "Saladin choose to declare a truce with the Crusaders in 1192 instead of fighting until the end." It gets the point across but I think it's ...
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1 vote
0 answers
99 views

What's the difference between class and category? [closed]

George Firican said the ER (entity relationship) is different for classification and categorization. The ERs according to him For classification members : classes 1:n (one to many) A futon can be in ...
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0 votes
1 answer
33 views

Do the Phrases "Entitled to" and "Eligible for" Mean the Same Thing? [closed]

It comes up in the Supreme Court Couse Bacerra vs. Empire Health Foundation. Here is some example context: "Person x is ENTITLED TO medical assistance" and "Person x is ELIGIBLE FOR ...
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0 votes
3 answers
104 views

A good term for "Dead" God [closed]

I am doing some world building for my game, but it's not really a world building question. I wouldn't have the problem with this term in my native language, it's strictly about the limits of my ...
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0 votes
3 answers
64 views

I'm looking for a word or phrase to describe a realization that a long held belief is wrong [closed]

I'm looking for a word or phrase to describe the realization that what you've always believed is not real. As an example: Let's say you grew up in a country that you where led to believe was far more ...
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1 vote
1 answer
76 views

Is there a meaningful difference between "abjure" and "abnegate"?

Can abjure and abnegate be used interchangeably? I see that abjure is defined as "solemnly renounce (a belief, cause, or claim)" and abnegate as "renounce or reject (something desired ...
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3 votes
1 answer
55 views

Looking for a word about writing lyrics for the purpose of fitting the music

There is a word that I'm desperately trying to remember. I think it is used in the context of songwriting but it could be more general. It describes the act of writing words to fit music, or to rhyme, ...
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1 vote
1 answer
67 views

What's a word for someone you know very well, but you're not friends? [duplicate]

You've known each other for years. You've talked for hours at a time before. You regularly interact in person and/or online. It's not that you don't like them. You're just neutral to them. You neither ...
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0 votes
0 answers
10 views

What is the word for extra, unneeded descriptive words describing something in a sentence? [duplicate]

What’s the term for extra, synonymous unneeded adjectives describing a noun or verb in a sentence?
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2 votes
2 answers
71 views

Is there a single word meaning "give good news about the future"?

Some languages I know have separate verbs for giving good news and giving bad news about the future. In English, we have a word that works fine for giving bad news of the future: warn. You warn about ...
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0 votes
0 answers
44 views

Word for "Unresearched/Untested and therefore potentially dangerous"?

Is there a word for this? E.g. The [unresearched/untested and therefore potentially dangerous] nature of brain implants may delay their becoming popular as people will be reluctant to use them. It ...
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0 votes
2 answers
71 views

Word for something that is likely significant?

Is there an English word out there that describes something that is likely (probably) significant or important? Meaning, there's a very good chance it's significant, remarkable, important, etc., but ...
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1 vote
1 answer
44 views

Single noun/phrase to denote transfer across levels of formality of language

Question: What is the name of the quality denoting the formality/colloquialism of and/or amount of jargon in language? Context: I am writing a review for a paper in which authors developed a model ...
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