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The form of an adjective or adverb ending with "-est" or "most".

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0answers
23 views

Is using a number in front of a superlative grammatically correct? [on hold]

Is using a number in front of superlative, like in, "10 Best Restaurants in ..." correct? I know using it like, "Best Restaurants in ..." is correct, but I'm not sure of the former one. If it's ...
2
votes
2answers
97 views

The most opposite word of “the largest”

When we compare numbers of people, we can use the phrases: "The highest/lowest number of people was" "The biggest/smallest number of people was" "The most/least people were" That the word "lowest" ...
2
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1answer
79 views

The largest, greatest, highest or biggest number of . .

I'm not a native speaker, and my teacher taught me to use "the biggest number of . . ." when comparing amounts of some things, but I've checked it in google which seems like "the largest, the greatest,...
0
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0answers
25 views

I don't know which is more correct to say

Basically I came across this as I was writing a birthday card to my cousin wishing her to enjoy her day but I really don't know which is more correct: "Enjoy the best out of it.." or "Enjoy the most ...
0
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1answer
87 views

Comparatives and superlatives for the word “statistic”

Let's say, there was a bar chart giving 2 different pieces of data for 3 groups. - Monkeys was the ______________ statistic. If you needed to complete the sentence above with a superlative ...
2
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2answers
76 views

Is it correct to say “my oldest child” when you have only two children?

I remember "oldest" child is more correctly used when you have more than two children - e.g. my older child (assumption that there are only two children); my oldest child (assumption that there are at ...
1
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1answer
36 views

How do I ask “who has done the most number of things” properly

Sorry if the title is confusing. Basically I want to ask people "who has done a certain thing for the most number/times" but I don't know to properly construct the sentence. Please help me.
1
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0answers
35 views

singular noun-verb agreement with superlative adjective

Is the noun-verb following sentence correct?: "Most metaphysics has been determined by it." I thought that with the superlative adjective 'most', the subject is made plural; but can it also be ...
2
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4answers
379 views

Usage of “elder” and “eldest” in degrees of comparison

If one has two elder brothers, is it OK to say "My eldest brother is this and the second eldest is that"?
1
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3answers
80 views

The use of superlative as in “the poorest half”

I saw the phrase "poorest half of the population." Is superlative always used with "half"? Is "poorer half" okay? Do you also say the "richest half"?
0
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0answers
37 views

Is “the” omitted before a superlative degree when we compare the same person or thing in different situations?

The is not used with superlatives in predicative position, when we compare the same person or thing in different situations. He is nicest in the evenings after he has had a few drinks. (NOT "...
0
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1answer
290 views

superlative + relative clause

An earlier question (Relative clauses: “I did the best I could.”) asks about the antecedent of the relative clause, and there are two answers there: The one (by @Man_From_India) accepted as the best ...
0
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4answers
467 views

the most vs. most

This earlier question asks about the omissibility of 'the' before 'most' in this example: (The) most tuna are caught in early November. The only answer there (by David Schwartz) that has received ...
0
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2answers
63 views

adjectives ,adverbs, superlatives [duplicate]

These are sentences that I saw in a grammar book, called the Oxford guide to English Grammar: "I find these pills work best." "We ran slowest in the race." Why doesn't sentence one they say "…...
0
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0answers
1k views

Buck naked: is this an unnecessary superlative?

A foreign speaker asked me what the difference between naked and buck naked is. I found myself in a quandry as to how to explain it: You can indicate a part is uncovered by saying "your |body part| ...
1
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0answers
290 views

“Most” as an intensifier, not as a superlative

Sometimes “most” is used as an intensifier rather than a superlative: “Lucy expressed herself most eloquently.” “The employees work most efficiently.” There are other degree adverbs that do ...
1
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0answers
57 views

One or anyone in superlatives?

In sentences with a superlative, which indefinite pronoun is more accurate: one or anyone? I'm referring to sentences such as: "It was the biggest cake one had ever seen." "It was the biggest cake ...
0
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0answers
336 views

Why is it sometimes 'most' and sometimes '-est'? [duplicate]

There are various rules about whether an adjective takes '-er/-est' or 'more/most', but they're based on syllable count and don't give an etymological rationale. Does anyone know? Is it based on ...
1
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0answers
1k views

When I needed you most vs When I needed you the most

This question happens to remind of an oldie song by Randy Vanwarmer, but I was wondering if the two are the same in effect or if they can be different, if at all, or if it's just a matter of ...
1
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1answer
551 views

Why can't I use “easierly” instead of “in an easier manner” or “more easily”?

Can you please explain why it is incorrect English?
1
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3answers
319 views

Is “the ugliest” a noun or an adjective?

In this sentence, is ugliest an adjective or a noun? He is the ugliest.
9
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3answers
3k views

Is “my hardest” a direct object in “I will try my hardest”?

I will try my hardest. I am confusing myself by trying to figure out the grammatical relations in this sentence. It is not clear to me whether my hardest is a direct object here. If it is not, what ...
0
votes
1answer
113 views

Using “What” or “Which” with superlatives [duplicate]

Is "Which is the longest river in the world?" correct OR "What is the longest river in the world?" OR are both of these correct? Please explain with reasons. Thanks!
0
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2answers
223 views

Superlative of a future action

I am writing a scientific document and I need to talk about a device that has not yet been built, but when it is, it will be the most powerful of its kind. So, how do I refer to it? My current ...
-1
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1answer
303 views

Does “one of the [superlative adjective]” need to be followed by a noun?

Luis is one of the tallest in his class. In this sentence, after tallest, should we use a noun or not?
0
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0answers
27 views

Why does “as best they can” mean the same as “as well as they can” and not “as they can better than anyone”? [duplicate]

See below for issues as to why the alleged duplicate (and its purported duplicate) seem to miss the point re: structure and only serve to rubber stamp poorly constructed grammar on the basis of ...
1
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1answer
442 views

Usage of superlative in the context of more than one item [duplicate]

Can we use superlative when we are talking about 2 or more items? I'm not quite sure about that since the rule says: "Superlative adjectives are used to describe an object which is at the upper or ...
2
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0answers
238 views

Can we use the superlative form adjective and another adjective at the same time?

I would like to ask about the usage of adjective. Simply, is it OK to put another adjective with noun which has already had the superlative formed adjective. For example, to make "the most beautiful ...
3
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3answers
3k views

What is the proper superlative of “bitter”?

What is the proper superlative of bitter? Is it most bitter or bitterest? I am assuming that either of these is the correct answer and I cannot recall hearing one more often than the other, and ...
1
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0answers
81 views

Is “those who came in greatest numbers” grammatical?

I am studying English and I have a question. I found it in my text book written by some teacher who is not a native speaker. "Those who came first and in greatest numbers to make their homes on the ...
0
votes
1answer
473 views

Superlative: Correct way to use mix “most” and “-est” adjectives/adverbs?

To create a superlative, when multiple adjectives/adverbs are preceded by most*, but the latter adjective/adverbs should normally be written with the -est suffix, which one of the two following forms ...
0
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0answers
57 views

Do you native speakers care about “the” when using superlative adverbs?

This website says that "The is not used with superlatives in predicative position, when we compare the same person or thing in different situations." So, She works best in the mornings. (A woman’s ...
2
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1answer
68 views

What happened to the superlative? [closed]

For some time now I'm hearing more and more people saying "that's one of the more interesting things I've seen", "that's one of his better dishes", etc. Even when talking about something very close ...
3
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1answer
2k views

Comparative of 'smart' where more than one adjective is involved

Related link: My answer to One answer to a Q. is suited to ELL, but the other answer is suited to EL&U on ELU Meta. In the course of an argument, Rathony said the following: I would answer, ...
5
votes
1answer
966 views

Why do superlative adverbs sometimes use 'the'?

"He ran the fastest." 'the fastest' is an adverb here, not a noun, so why does it use the definite article 'the'? We could say "He ran fastest", and that works fine too. If we say "He is the fastest ...
4
votes
1answer
309 views

Why “respect you most” instead of “respect you more” in the following quote by Samuel Johnson?

"Go into the street and give one man a lecture on morality and another a shilling, and see which will respect you most." British Literature 1640-1789 I can't figure out why Johnson used "most" ...
0
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1answer
2k views

Good, Better, Best vs. High Higher Highest [duplicate]

The comparison in question isn't so much about Higher/Highest specifically, but why do we start with Good and not go to Gooder, Goodest? Edit: I was flagged a duplicate despite previous searching. I ...
4
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2answers
936 views

Relative clauses: “I did the best I could.”

I did the best I could. The sentence above can be rephrased: I did the best that I could. In these two examples (that) I could is a relative clause. However, I am not sure whether it is modifying ...
3
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2answers
961 views

“Lowest” vs. “lowermost”

Is there any difference between the words lowest and lowermost? When should I use either of them? Possibly lowermost should never be used?
1
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0answers
91 views

Using superlatives as prefixes, order of significance [duplicate]

This is kind of an opinion-leaning question. I'm naming a set of items based on their order of significance. Their names will be prefixed with the following superlatives: super, ultra, mega, hyper, ...
4
votes
2answers
40k views

“of utmost importance” vs “of the utmost importance”

Which one is the correct form between "of utmost" and "of the utmost"? Your attendance at the meeting is of the utmost importance. Your attendance at the meeting is of utmost importance. I'...
2
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2answers
504 views

Why does “He is as rich as any in our town” mean “He is one of the richest people in our town”?

According to my textbook, the sentence He is as rich as any in our town. has the same meaning as the following one: He is one of the richest people in our town. Is it right? It seems that the ...
5
votes
5answers
11k views

Is it correct to use “most” + “-est” together?

I was over exaggerating while writing something for class and I wrote Welcome to the most wildest show on earth. Someone pointed out the most wildest and I was wondering if it was OK to use most ...
0
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2answers
840 views

What is the base form called of a superlative or comparative adjective? [duplicate]

Motivation: I'm doing a text-mining project and I'd like to map all forms of an adjective to their "base-form". Example: bigger -> big biggest -> big stronger -> strong strongest -&...
32
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9answers
5k views

Is “best” still a superlative in “best friend”, as in can you have more than one “best friend”?

I was speaking to a 15-year-old native English speaker (in Australia), who referred to someone as her "best friend". Later, she revealed that this wasn't her only best friend. She had four best ...
3
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1answer
2k views

Is there a word for “conjugating” an adjective?

Verbs can be conjugated to past/future tenses. Nouns can be pluralized. Adjectives also have comparative and superlative forms. For example fast, faster, and fastest. What is the word that describes ...
0
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3answers
754 views

Is there a phrase for 'attending for the longest time'?

I am trying to find a phrase to replace 'longest-serving'. It is in regards to a customer who is the customer who has come to a store for the longest amount of time so they are not really 'serving' ...
2
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2answers
223 views

I wonder whether it is the relative pronoun

Truth be told, I never graduated from college, and this is the closest I've ever gotten to a college graduation. In this clip from Steve job's speech in Standford school, I wonder what is the part of ...
15
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7answers
16k views

How can something be “fuller” or the “fullest”?

Consider the definition for full (Source): full [foo l] adjective, fuller, fullest. completely filled; containing all that can be held; filled to utmost capacity: a full cup. ...
2
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4answers
722 views

Can something be “blacker” than something else? How common are single-word comparatives and superlatives for color-designating adjectives?

Merriam-Webster implies that the comparative and superlative for black are blacker and blackest. However, my native British colleague says he would never used blacker, only more black. How common is ...