Questions tagged [superlative-degree]

The form of an adjective or adverb ending with "-est" or "most".

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2answers
92 views

What are the comparative/superlative forms of the adjective "well," meaning "in good health"?

If I can say, "He is well," meaning, "He is in good health," how do I express that he's in better health, or that he's in the best health ever? "He's weller"? "He's ...
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The city the closest to Istanbul

I see some examples with adjectives taking place after nouns they define like I want to go to a city close to Istanbul Have you ever had a friend kind to you? But what about their -st or -most(...
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38 views

Is it correct to paraphrase "the most" as "one of the most"

I just want to know if I have paraphrased the following accurately or is there another way to paraphrase it? The original sentence is: Our previous study also demonstrated that PCP was the most ...
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BEST (singular noun; usually "the best") the most excellent thing or person

[singular] (usually "the best") the most excellent thing or person: We're the best of friends (= very close friends). Yet, I do not know how to interpret it as a singular thing/person here. ...
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Superlative form of the adjective "little" for degree or intensity

Inflections of 'little' (adj): For size or age: Littler ("That tree is little, but the tree next to it is even littler."). Littlest ("Theo is the littlest of my three little brothers.&...
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3answers
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Is "Our creamiest coffee, now creamier" correct?

Kopiko's tagline here in the Philippines became a hot topic. Others had been saying that it is grammatically wrong but others said that it is correct.
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The event before the latest one is "the last one"

Page 265 of the Collins English Usage reads If one of a series of events is happening now or has just happened, you refer to it as the latest one. You refer to the event before the latest one as the ...
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Is there a linguistic term for the phrases, which describe a noun, with subjective value (below)

a pitted excuse for a road a big bear of a man a gigantic furious beast of a man a wisp of a boy/girl
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'quickest': adverb

Page 442 of Collins Cobuild English Usage reads Quick is an adjective. You do not usually use it as an adverb. Instead you use quickly. In writing, you usually use more quickly. He began to speak ...
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131 views

Can we say "Most Legendariest"? [duplicate]

I want to know if this sentence is correct. Can we say "Most Legendariest ....."? If not, what is the alternative I can use? Thank you very much.
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476 views

Is powerfulest a valid superlative?

Whenever I type powerfulest in a word document or on here it’s always flagged as a grammar error. I immediately consulted google and found some entries in low end “dictionaries”, but came across this ...
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“The most of” as in “the biggest portion”?

I am not sure if this type of usage of “the most of” is correct. If someone can help clarify, I would really appreciate it. Ex: Out of the three siblings, John received the most of the estate their ...
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Absolute superlative

"2020 is said to be a darkest year" I learned in my book that the superlative with most is sometimes used when there's no idea of comparison but to show the existence of a quality of a very ...
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The usage of "most" instead of "more"

Regarding the following sentence, The study noted that pregnant women need to have healthy diets to reduce risk of developing gestational diabetes, a form of diabetes that is most common among ...
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86 views

superlative or comparison

I have a question about some sentences. John is better than Sarah and Mary. or John is the best. If I'm comparing three things (John, Sarah, Mary), why am I using a comparative adjective? I ...
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3k views

Comparing adverbs in comparative and superlative forms

Comparing with adverbs in comparative or superlative form: When would us louder / loudest and when would you use more loudly / most loudly
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the/a right person and the tallest person

Why is it 'tallest person' always only takes 'the,' and that 'right person' may sometimes take 'a' depending on what you mean? I don't know how I should put it, but the 'comparative superlative + ...
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Indefinite article + superlative adjective

There can no more be a best possible world than there can be a largest number. What does "a largest number" mean here? What is the difference in that sentence between "the" and "a"?
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Is the expression "the biggest such business" grammatically correct?

I have found the expression “the biggest such business” in the second sentence in The Economist. It has also made it easier for people to find the ingredients, kit and talent necessary to cook ...
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141 views

Is it correct to say second maximum?

I've seen, "second largest" being used more often. Is there any special reason that, "second maximum", is not a correct thing expression? For example, if I have an array of numbers: 1,2,3, is it ...
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Use of definite article before superlative adverbs [duplicate]

What is the rule regarding the use of definite article (the) before superlative adverbs? Is it mandatory, optional, or not required at all to use the before superlative adverbs?
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There is no question that you will not misunderstand this sentence

The MacMillan Dictionary has the following definition for the phrase 'there is no question that': used for saying that something is definitely true It gives the example: There is no question ...
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155 views

Superlative, present perfect vs past perfect

In the following context, can I have present perfect, or do I need to use past perfect? It was the worst food I've ever eaten / I had ever eaten. Thank you :)
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1answer
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What does the phrase "it has been" mean in the sentence?

I came across a headline on a website yesterday, saying: "Razer Huntsman Elite is the cheapest it has been in the UK, at £158." I think I can roughly understand the sentence (Razer Huntsman Elite ...
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Do -ist words (e.g. racist) have superlative or comparative forms?

Do -ist words (e.g. racist, sexist, etc.) have superlative or comparative forms?
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140 views

Superlative or not?

In the sentence In the time of full-blown financial crisis in the country's history the contingency measures undertaken by the bank's shareholders and the management proved insufficient. does ...
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Can we say " the most similar passages"?

A comparison of the most similar passages from this tradition could shed light, I hope, on the interpretation of the first Palladan monosyllabic substantive.
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Superlatives - "in all" vs. "of all"

Example sentence: "He ran the fastest (of all) the anchors." - my coworker (an ESL teacher) wants to know specifically why we can't say "He ran the fastest (in all) the anchors". I feel like it may ...
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"least riskiest" vs "safest" - double superlative or single is better? [duplicate]

Is "least riskiest" stylistically correct? Can it be considered a double superlative? Would "safest" be a better choice?
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Is 'most ugly' a correct term? [duplicate]

My friend recently said "My parents got me the most ugly Sherry glasses I've ever seen". He is a native English speaker and said that 'most ugly' in this context is correct even though I've always ...
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3answers
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The most / most

He's most approachable first thing in the morning. I don't understand why I must use "most" and I can't use "The most". I have a little knowledge that "most" is an adverb which amplifies an ...
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Comparative or superlative adjective?

I think it is best not to be impolite. Is the above sentence fine, or should it have better instead of best in it?
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1answer
288 views

is ‘fine’ in the sense ‘of very good quality’ gradable? [closed]

Fine in the sense of very good quality seems to be an absolute adjective, and since absolute adjectives are not gradable, so I am wondering if this principle applies to fine in the sense ‘of very good ...
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3answers
234 views

Why isn't the definite article used before "closest" in "Who are you closest to"?

Why is there no definite article before "closest" in the question "Who are you closest to in your family?" My only assumption is that "to be close to someone" is a set phrase and it is used without an ...
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2answers
1k views

The most opposite word of "the largest"

When we compare numbers of people, we can use the phrases: "The highest/lowest number of people was" "The biggest/smallest number of people was" "The most/least people were" That the word "lowest" ...
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9k views

The largest, greatest, highest or biggest number of . .

I'm not a native speaker, and my teacher taught me to use "the biggest number of . . ." when comparing amounts of some things, but I've checked it in google which seems like "the ...
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Comparatives and superlatives for the word "statistic"

Let's say, there was a bar chart giving 2 different pieces of data for 3 groups. - Monkeys was the ______________ statistic. If you needed to complete the sentence above with a superlative ...
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2answers
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Is it correct to say “my oldest child” when you have only two children?

I remember "oldest" child is more correctly used when you have more than two children - e.g. my older child (assumption that there are only two children); my oldest child (assumption that there are at ...
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1answer
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How do I ask "who has done the most number of things" properly

Sorry if the title is confusing. Basically I want to ask people "who has done a certain thing for the most number/times" but I don't know to properly construct the sentence. Please help me.
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singular noun-verb agreement with superlative adjective

Is the noun-verb following sentence correct?: "Most metaphysics has been determined by it." I thought that with the superlative adjective 'most', the subject is made plural; but can it also be ...
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Usage of "elder" and "eldest" in degrees of comparison

If one has two elder brothers, is it OK to say "My eldest brother is this and the second eldest is that"?
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3answers
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The use of superlative as in “the poorest half”

I saw the phrase "poorest half of the population." Is superlative always used with "half"? Is "poorer half" okay? Do you also say the "richest half"?
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superlative + relative clause

An earlier question (Relative clauses: “I did the best I could.”) asks about the antecedent of the relative clause, and there are two answers there: The one (by @Man_From_India) accepted as the best ...
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the most vs. most

This earlier question asks about the omissibility of 'the' before 'most' in this example: (The) most tuna are caught in early November. The only answer there (by David Schwartz) that has received 16 ...
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adjectives ,adverbs, superlatives [duplicate]

These are sentences that I saw in a grammar book, called the Oxford guide to English Grammar: "I find these pills work best." "We ran slowest in the race." Why doesn't sentence one they say "…...
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“Most” as an intensifier, not as a superlative

Sometimes “most” is used as an intensifier rather than a superlative: “Lucy expressed herself most eloquently.” “The employees work most efficiently.” There are other degree adverbs that do this, ...
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One or anyone in superlatives?

In sentences with a superlative, which indefinite pronoun is more accurate: one or anyone? I'm referring to sentences such as: "It was the biggest cake one had ever seen." "It was the biggest cake ...
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Why is it sometimes 'most' and sometimes '-est'? [duplicate]

There are various rules about whether an adjective takes '-er/-est' or 'more/most', but they're based on syllable count and don't give an etymological rationale. Does anyone know? Is it based on ...
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When I needed you most vs When I needed you the most

This question happens to remind of an oldie song by Randy Vanwarmer, but I was wondering if the two are the same in effect or if they can be different, if at all, or if it's just a matter of ...
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Why can't I use "easierly" instead of "in an easier manner" or "more easily"?

Can you please explain why it is incorrect English?