Questions tagged [suffixes]

A suffix is an element of a language that is added to the end of a word. E.g. -ly is a suffix often found at the end of adverbs: really, quickly, happily, strangely, etc., -d/-ed is a suffix often found at the end of a verb to denote the simple past: used, bruised, grazed, heated, etc.

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What could possibly cause the stress shift in adverbs ending in -arily compared to adjectives ending in -ary?

While adjectives ending in -ary (British English /əri/, American English /eri/) never have stress on the second last syllable (the /e/ in AmE, and obviously the /ə/ in BrE), their derivative adverbs ...
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What is the "-sie" suffix meaning?

While playing Thief: The Dark Project, I noticed the use of the suffix "-sie" in some words, for example: woodsie, goodsie, treesie, etc. I struggled to find an explanation for this and ...
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If I'm ranting I'm the ranter. So is the subject of said rant the rantee? Or the person hearing it? What's the other called, then?

...and do they have a suffix of their own? Cambridge says "-er" is "added to [...] verbs to form nouns that refer to people or things that [do/are performing] that particular activity&...
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Have I constructed & used "exoplanetship" correctly? If not, what word could be constructed to address the planetary status of an observed phenomenon? [closed]

In this Astronomy SE answer to Is one transit enough to be confident that we detected an exoplanet I wrote: See the excellent answers there to get a better idea of the great extent to which the ...
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Why is "taxa" the plural form of "taxon"?

According to Wikipedia, taxon is a back-formation from taxonomy, meaning that the n in the taxon comes from the suffix nomy, so why the heck is the plural of taxon -- taxa? Are scientists thinking ...
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8 votes
5 answers
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Suffix: must be X

Is there a suffix (or any other construct) that I can use with a base to express that this must (or is meant to) happen? For example, instead of: This car must be recalled use: This car is recall&...
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Simplification of 'ou' in suffixes of American words which differ from British version

As mentioned in other posts (like here), words which contain an 'ou' in their British spelling are typically spelled with an 'o' in the American equivalent. I'm interested in the reasoning and ...
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Suffix in adverbs: The use of the term 'normally distributed' in place of 'normal distributed'

When a word is used as an adverb then it is normally combined with a suffix like "-ly" or "-ian". Like 'normal' becomes 'normally' and the previous sentence is an example of its ...
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What do you call the construction noun + "-ed" which, like an adjective, can modify another noun? [closed]

There are some words that appear to be adjectives formed from nouns inflected with something that looks like the past participle ending "-ed". Some of these are preceded (hyphenated in my ...
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-ed suffix in compounds [closed]

I read somewhere in a book on morphology that -ed suffix in compounds conveys the notion of having something, therefore "a one-armed man" means " a man having one arm", so i was ...
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Suffixes that are words: why aren't they considered compounds?

There are some common suffixes, -less, -able, -full, and -wise, that are also full words on their own. Why isn't adding these words on considered compound words instead of suffixes? Or to say it ...
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How does the noun cause the suffix of compound adjectives to change?

I'm comparing the names of bird species with similar compound adjectives. In some cases, the first word of the compound adjective changes with different nouns. Some examples: Silver-throated Tanager ...
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Where did the word red-tapism come from?

What is the origin of the word red-tapism? And what does it actually mean? Lexico says it first appeared in the mid-19th century in the Cobbett's Weekly Political Register, a London paper. Searching ...
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6 votes
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Looking for a suffix to denote paraphernalia associated with a person

Can someone help me identify the below-described suffix. I feel I've seen it before, but I can't bring it to mind or locate it through my usual methods (i.e., search queries). The suffix is added to ...
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Is it correct to call the modifier's value modifiee?

The reason for my question was part of doing documentation for my program. I commented on my For statement since it is an array that has two associated elements. Thus, the comment went on as follows: /...
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Is there a semantic difference between ‘without’ and ‘‑less’?

I am trying to decide whether the sentences [X] argues [Y]’s death to be without sin and [X] argues [Y]’s death to be sinless actually carry the same meaning. The Oxford Dictionary defines ‘...
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Noun form of adjectives ending -ant: -ancy or -ance? [closed]

Adjectives ending -ant seem to have a 50/50 chance of ending -ancy or -ance in noun form. Same goes for -ent adjectives into -ency or -ence nouns. Is there a rule that determines which? Random ...
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5 votes
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How common are hypocorisms ending with "s" in female names? (Babs, Bess, Becks...)

My question can be split in two parts: Is this a pattern, how common is it, and how natural does it sound? Is it more specific to feminine names? Here are examples: Barbara - Babs [1] Elizabeth - ...
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What is the opposite of the suffix -cide? [duplicate]

All the words ending with the suffix -cide explain what was killed. Is there a suffix for what did the killing? Killed by hammer, killed by fall, etc.? Thanks.
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Is modern 'five countries' English the only type of English with stress patterns that change across the entire word depending on the suffix?

The capital letters represent where the main stress in each word lies TELephone, telePHONic, teLEphony. PHOTograph, photoGRAphic, photOgraphy. biOLogy, bioLOGical. What about in the past, including ...
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Rule for suffix to describe where someone is from [duplicate]

Is there a rule or pattern to describe where someone comes from? Some examples of places, with the word to describe people from that place: New York / New Yorker London / Londoner Toronto / ...
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Does the suffix -ify have any inherent characteristics of making letters pronounced which would otherwise be silent?

It is quite clear that the word "signify" is derived from sign and the suffix -ify: sign + -ify = signify The letter "g" in the word sign is silent but when the suffix is added, ...
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3 votes
2 answers
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What suffix rule applies to making rival into rivalrous (i.e., is this legitimate)

I was annoyed to find my neuroscience textbook transforming the noun "rival" into an adjective in ...IT changes systematically when people and animals report switches in rivalrous percepts. ...
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Is -in' really correct? [duplicate]

I wanted to know if -in' is really correct. Because I couldn't found a single article about the -in' ending. Examples: -ing Running Jumping -in' Runnin' Jumpin'
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What is the agent noun for verbs ending in -y? [closed]

What is the correct way of spelling it, and what would the rule be for -y verbs like retry. Is it retryer or retrier? That is, on -y verbs, is the y kept or substituted by i?
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Why does “lineage” retain the "e" when the suffix "-age" is added?

"Lineage" (/ˈlɪn·i·ɪdʒ/) is equivalent to "line" + "-age". Other such nouns lose the "e" when this suffix is added: Stem + Suffix = Noun Anecdote + Age = ...
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10 votes
4 answers
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Origin of colloquializing suffix -o

The letter o is used in different combinations with words to make them more colloquial as suggested from the following extract. -o generally does not change the meaning of the word, only making it ...
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Why "admit" with T but "admissible" with SS? [duplicate]

I have noticed that when the suffix -ible is added to "admit", it becomes "admissible" rather than "admittible". There are few other examples: "omit" = "...
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what does to word 'crete' mean in English? [closed]

In my native language, words are created using 'Root Words' + 'Prefixes/suffixes'. Also the root words make sense for us. Is English the same? For example I think the word 'crete' is the root and 'dis,...
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Differentiating the meaning of the -able suffix ('able to be' vs 'to be')

The suffix -able has several meanings, one of them is: (forming adjectives) to be: payable How does one differentiate this meaning from the other meanins of -able? For example, how does one know ...
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Why do some words containing a form of “philia” have it at the beginning and some have it at the end?

There are words like “philosophy”, “philology”, “philanthropy”; these have a form of “philia” at the beginning. Why don't these words have it at the end? Also, there are words like “haemophilia”, “...
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Adjective from verbs at active voice

In English, verbs can be conjugated both in the active and passive voice. It makes it possible to distinguish who is doing the action and who/what the action is done on/against. e.g. |-----------------...
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Why is "tion" pronounced as "shun" but not "chun"?

I know English spelling never follows English pronunciation and I also know that English spelling is very irregular but there are reasons for such irregularities. This question is only asking about ...
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1 answer
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What is the meaning of the suffix '-ory' (laboratory, conservatory)?

I am interested in the the meaning which the suffix '-ory' contributes to words like laboratory, conservatory and lavatory. I often find if difficult to research prefixes and suffixes, so would be ...
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Is "place name + er" ("New Yorker") a productive morpheme? [closed]

I know a handful of cities whose denizens can be called "city+er", e.g. Londoner. But is this construction still in active use today and can new demonyms be formed by it?
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Is it "multi-element" or "multi-elemental"? "Multi-attribute" or "multi-attributed"?

I've seen both being used, so I'm having a hard time telling which one is correct. Logic dictates that it's supposed to be "multi-elemental" and "multi-attributed," considering we ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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-IZE: unstressed (though strong)

According to the Longman Pronunciation Dictionary -IZE /aɪz/: This suffix is unstressed (though strong) in Received Pronunciation and General American, but sometimes stressed in other varieties"....
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Why do some spell checker mark "copiable" as an error?

Some of my spell checkers (including the one in vim, and the build-in one in gmail) mark the form "copiable" as an error, and insist on "copyable". This doesn't seem to make sense; ...
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2 votes
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Is it franchiser, or franchisor?

From this morning, in an online conversation, of mine, about Econo Lodge franchises. My usual on-line go-to place to resolve such close differences in words is, https://wikidiff.com/franchiser/...
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"beginning" is to "prefix" as "end" is to "suffix" as "middle" is to... what?

The word "prefix" describes something affixed to the beginning of a word and the word "suffix" describes something affixed to the end of a word. What is the analog of these for ...
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percent or percentage on variable name suffix?

Which is more suitable for putting suffix which stands for '0~100%'? int CrashRatePercent; int CrashRatePercentage;
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3 votes
3 answers
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Words Similar to the -Smith Suffix [closed]

I am aware of -wright, which is often used as a compound, e.g. playwright. But are there any other suffixes that are synonymous or similar in meaning to -wright and -smith?
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Verb + Suffix ‘Ion’ as noun [closed]

I've been wondering on the usage of the suffix -ion and what it means if put at the end of a verb. I notice that oftentimes it means the process/ action of the verb. Examples: Transformation, ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Usage of the -al suffix on "value"

I am trying to write the following phrase: Axiom about the source of value. I cannot, however, figure out how to compact the phrase to just a few words. My mind went to using the -al suffix, and ...
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Why doesn’t the verb “read” have a corresponding noun form suffixed with “‑tion/‑ion/‑sion”?

Why there isn’t a ‑tion/‑ion/‑sion derived form for the verb read verb, such as for example the non-existent ✼readation or ✼readition? Example with an ‑tion form: exsanguination disobstruction ...
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Determing the lexical category of a word based on the affixes attached

I am currently taking a Linguistics course and am learning about affixes. Through reading the textbook and following the lectures, I have realized that certain prefixes and suffixes are attached to ...
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Are morphemes commonly found at the end of words considered suffixes?

Are morphemes commonly found at the end of words considered suffixes? For example: "erate", found at the end of words like accelerate, operate, refrigerate, considerate, nonliterate, etc. I ...
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Which is correct: "methods of ID check" or "methods of ID checking"?

I'm writing some text that explains three different ways of carrying out an ID check. Would the section heading read "Methods of ID check" or "Methods of ID checking"? If someone could explain the ...
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5 answers
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Can you use the -ly suffix with any noun? e.g "Hotelly" [closed]

A friend and I were having a discussion when I used the word "hotelly" to describe something that has the characteristics of a hotel. Afterward, we started doubting the legitimacy of the word "hotelly"...
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4 votes
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Why some words ending in -ke become -cable (and/or -cative), while others become -kable (or -keable)

Today I learnt that revoke + able would make revocable. What's the reasoning for this? Are there any other examples like this?
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