Questions tagged [suffixes]

A suffix is an element of a language that is added to the end of a word. E.g. -ly is a suffix often found at the end of adverbs: really, quickly, happily, strangely, etc., -d/-ed is a suffix often found at the end of a verb to denote the simple past: used, bruised, grazed, heated, etc.

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58 views

Malcolmite and anti-Malcolmite

What is the meaning of "Malcolmite." in the following text? Edward Ingram's In Defence of British India should be mentioned as one of the most extraordinary examples of the deliberate ignoring of ...
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156 views

Where does the -ive suffix come from in 'restive'?

I saw a headline today about the volcano near Manila in the Philippines. Restive Philippine volcano prompts evacuation MSN News 12th January 2020 I was not familiar with the word 'restive' and ...
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45 views

Suffixes to certain words [closed]

Can -ed, -ing and -tion be added to the words positive, negative and advise? What rules would explain this?
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52 views

The word for pertaining to personality [closed]

We all know that the -al suffix creates the meaning of "pertaining to" or "relating to" or "of the kind" with a noun, e.g. social, fictional etc.... What I am looking for is a word for pertaining to ...
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51 views

What would the correct suffix be for the action of prepending *something*?

The act of prepending or to prepend should have a proper form of the word. For example, prepension and prependation seem to be logical options. Personally I would be more inclined to use prepension ...
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What is the Greek etymology for “-on” in words like “proton” and “neutron”? [closed]

Google says "proton" is from "protos" and "-on" ("first" + "being"), or "πρῶτος" and "?". What is the "-on" in Greek, is it "ὤν" or "ἐν" or something?
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1answer
59 views

Suffix for an adherent with person's name as root

We can refer to a particular method devised by Newton as the "Newtonian method" or a distribution attributed to Laplace might be referred to as the "Laplacian Distribution". Some colleagues were ...
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1answer
273 views

Add -al to verb to make a noun

Do you have any examples of nouns that are formed by adding -al to a verb? I can think of one example (rental), but would like to have a few more. Thank you for your help!
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Why is “-ber” the suffix of the last four months of the year?

September October November December Presumably something Latin, but my (admittedly brief) search sees only mention of the number-based root words. More specifically, what does "-ber" mean?
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What would an appropriate suffix be to mean “branch of magic” [duplicate]

I know "-mancy" already exists (like necromancy and pyromancy), but if you look into the root of the word, it acutally refers to divination, and not general magic powers It could be easily argued ...
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33 views

Why is it Orthodontics but Pedodontia?

Similarly we also have words like Periodontia and Exodontia and Endodontia (and Endodontics too apparently) and for many of them, I just can not find which one is correct?
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Why is it Endodontic (-ic suffix) but Dental (-al suffix)?

Especially when they both derive from Endodontist and Dentist respectively, so context doesn't vary much. I found many answers on the web explaining that -ic and -ical suffixes don't follow any rule ...
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X vs. X-al adjectives (asymptotic vs asymptotical, etc.)

Right now I am writing a technical report, where I describe asymptotic(al) curves, expansions etc. My understanding after a bit of web browsing is that asymptotic and asymptotical are near-synonymous ...
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235 views

A question about 'reptiles and volatiles' to describe creatures

I noticed in the Wycliffe Bible, in early Genesis, that the description of 'creeping creatures' and 'flying creatures' was 'reptiles and volatiles'. I had not heard or read of bird species being ...
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inter- prefix means between but interact has a whole different meaning than -inter or act, why is that?

I just started to dig into suffixes and prefixes. But I couldn't understand how do they exactly change the meaning of the word that they are appended. For example re- means again, retake means take ...
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49 views

Incrementor vs Incrementer

While this may be pedantic, I'm curious about the proper usage, if any. We have a piece of software that opens a file, increments a counter in the file, and closes the file. This piece of software is ...
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142 views

Is there an '-ism' for 'human rights'?

Capitalism means a view that gives priority to capital and has capital as its pivotal notion. Nationalism means a view that gives priority to what is national and has national as its pivotal ...
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Pronotum: meaning and suffix context?

Pronotum The pronotum (Biology) is a prominent plate-like structure that covers all or part of the thorax of some insects. The pronotum covers the dorsal surface of the thorax. The word can be ...
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Why is there an extra “t” in Lemmatization?

When we say : Specify, it becomes Specification (no t) Value, it becomes Valuation (no t) Custom, it becomes Customization (no t) Lemma is a code used in programming, to describe the ...
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32 views

Subject with -ian suffix is a?

Is there a word which describes the relation of, when associating or committing, an added suffix such as “-ian” (or “-ic”, et al.) to its subject? For example: “Orwellian is the _____ of/for ...
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93 views

Meaning of suffix ''- ic'' in relation to ''materialist'' vs ''materialistic''

If there are any, what are the differences in meaning between the statements ''I am a materialist person'' and ''I am a materialistic person'' ? *Context: In a conversation on philosophical ...
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Are the adjective “wise” and the suffix “-wise” etymologically related?

Are they linked, or have they arisen seperatedly and/or without connection?
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515 views

for words ending in “ing”, what parts are stressed?

For words ending in the -ing suffix, is the suffix stressed? Unstressed? Does adding the -ing suffix affect the stress of the other syllables? Example: (u is untressed, ' is stressed) Deteriorate is (...
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119 views

Pronunciation of the -ate suffix

I've noticed that a few words may be both a noun and an adjective, remain spelt the same, but change the pronunciation of -ate to ət or āt. Sometimes the meanings are related, others they are not. ...
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164 views

When did “committee” become a collective noun, and why?

According to dictionary.com, "committee" comes from late Middle English, with the suffix -ee added to the word "commit". Typical use of the -ee suffix would imply the meaning of "one who commits" or "...
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Is “skills-wise” correct English?

In the following sentence: ...take a technical test, so your team can determine if I am suitable for the position skills-wise. Is "skills-wise" legitimate English? If not, how could I change it ...
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790 views

If -ment suffix is from Old French, then why does it form nouns instead of adverbs?

The suffix -ment forms nouns from verbs, e.g. entertain → entertainment. A similar suffix exists in French (and -mente in other Romance languages) that forms adverbs from adjectives, e.g. sûr → ...
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116 views

Candidature - problem with suffix- ship

Can 'Candidature-Ship' be proper word . or it must be just Candidature ! Like , I would like to apply my candidature -ship for the post Retail Manager . Is the sentence is Valid ?
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109 views

What words frequently collocate with “-wise”? [closed]

Would it make any sense if just combined any nouns with with -wise? For example, Aesthetic-wise? Money-wise?
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49 views

What 'type' of a word is the word “goings-on”?

I'm not sure how to phrase this correctly, but I noticed that the word "goings-on" has the plural suffix of '-s' before the end of the word. If this wasn't the case, it would be "going-ons" which of ...
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112 views

Shouldn't “some of the phenomenon” be plural?

The paragraph: Our team conducts fundamental research in Philosophy, trying to push the boundaries of what is possible with new techniques, and also trying to understand and formalize some of ...
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1answer
318 views

Where is the stress of the noun “Portuguese”?

Studying suffixes I've learned that "-ESE" is a strong suffix, therefore it holds the main stress when it's added to a word (e.g. China -> Chinese; Japan -> Japanese; journal -> journalese; etc.). ...
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138 views

Is there currently a shift from -nce word endings to -ncy word endings?

This is something I think I've noticed, but maybe I've just been noticing odd word choices and putting it down to a shift in language use. Has anyone noticed a shift from people using verb-derived ...
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35 views

A term for an ending that makes a subject from a verb?

I was looking up "wallah" and the OED said "from the Hindi suffix -vālā ‘doer’" and I was wondering if there was a term for suffixes like this. I suspect the answer is really trivial More English ...
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168 views

Is the verb suffix -en (as in light->lighten) rooted in German?

Is the verb suffix -en (as in light->lighten) rooted in German? German verbs in their infinitive form always end in -en.
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Is there a suffix that means “the science of…”

I'm writing a fantasy book and I'm trying to come up with words to describe certain magic subjects and I want it to sound right.
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1k views

Usage of wide as a suffix

I've looked for the subject, but I don't find a comprehensive answer. I've checked Fowler's MEU, but I'm not happy with the answers I find because I don't find the precise point I'm looking for, so I ...
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72 views

Suffix corresponding to an idea described with two nouns

Please pardon my lack of understanding for major English Language concepts, I'll be using layman's terms. Now, I've encountered this issue in the past while writing. Consider this text: That was ...
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436 views

Is 'fer' a somewhat usual spelling of 'for', or is it perhaps restricted to cricket ('five-fer')?

-fer a suffix to any number, meaning the number of wickets taken by a team or bowler. (See also fifer/five-fer) Wikipedia I assume that 'fer' means, or is derived from, 'for' with the usually ...
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1answer
230 views

What determines the stress of an adjective formed by adding “-ive” to a verb ending in “-ate”?

Some verbs ending in -ate keep their original syllable stress when you add the suffix -ive to form an adjective e.g., imitate/imitative meditate/meditative investigate/investigative For ...
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261 views

Past tense of MOT? [duplicate]

I'm usually quite good at this kind of thing but can't decide on this. When describing when a car has had its MOT (Ministry of Transport) test do I write... Recently MOTd Recently MOT'd Recently ...
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50 views

Why is the “up” in “sign-up” related to “creating a new account” but “in” in “sign-in” refers to a existing one? [closed]

What is the difference between in and up that causes the meaning of sign to change? Research: etymonline's entries for sign-in and sign-up don't help much.
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752 views

Do prefixes & suffixes have antonyms?

Question Do prefixes & suffixes have antonyms? As in, is it possible for a prefix or suffix to not have an antonym? Example Google defines "-gon" as: -gon combining form in nouns ...
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118 views

Difference between the -genous and -ginous word suffixes

I was wondering whether anyone knows the exact difference between the English suffixes -agenous and -aginous. I believe the difference is that the first suffix has to do with describing the rough ...
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169 views

How do I write a variable as an ordinal number?

I'm charged with translating a technical document into English, and ran into a bit of an odd problem: the document refers to undefined numbers of elements, and uses letters to represent those numbers, ...
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231 views

“Fadable” vs. “Fadeable”: which is preferred?

This answer has some great insight on adding -able to the word "scrape". I'm wondering if there is any reason to use "fadable". "Fadeable" has a very clear pronunciation and is how I would guess it ...
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4answers
331 views

Does the “-s” change the word class of “it”? [closed]

The word it is a pronoun. When I add an s to it, does it change the word class? For example in the following sentence: The gift is still in its box. My questions are: Does the "S" change ...
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203 views

Do I use the suffix -ist or -istic in adjectival forms of words that end in -ism

So basically, I want to use the word infallibilism in its adjectival form and I don't whether to write infallibilist or infallibilistic. I have to say the former sounds better for some reason. An ...
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2answers
863 views

Would you please explain to me the morphology of the word retroviral?

I cannot understand the morphology of the word retroviral. is "re" the prefix? I think the prefix might be retro, is that true? is "al the suffix? I am assuming that "viral" is the root, is ...
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432 views

Synonyms for -mancy (like necromancy)

It's common enough for a type of magic to be described in fantasy as *-mancy: Arithmancy in Harry Potter, Astromancy in Warhammer 40k, etc. that picking a Greek or Latin root and adding -mancy is ...

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