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Questions tagged [subjects]

Questions about determining the subject of a sentence or clause

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51
votes
3answers
35k views

Why is the subject omitted in sentences like "Thought you'd never ask"?

"Thought you'd never ask" is "I thought you'd never ask" with "I" omitted. "Hope this helps" is "I hope this helps" with "I" omitted. In English grammar, normally every sentence should have a subject,...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Subject-auxiliary inversions not associated with questions [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Inversion in “only [adverb] have they” Is there some rule governing the following, or similar, subject-auxiliary inversions (*"Rarely they do see the light of day", *"Never I ...
6
votes
2answers
818 views

"What questions [is/are] your data team hoping to answer?"

Over at stats.stackexchange we are having a minor kerfuffle over whether a title is using incorrect grammar. It has been edited and re-edited several times. It would be great to get some arbitration ...
19
votes
1answer
58k views

Which is correct: "you and I" or "you and me"?

I was told the correct usage is for example: "My wife and me" but I hear often "I and my wife" or "my wife and I". Google gives 34M results for "My wife and I" ...
6
votes
2answers
4k views

Does modifying a collective noun with a number make the subject plural?

The word dozen is a collective noun, i.e., singular when we think of them as groups and plural when we think of the individuals acting within the whole. So we might say: Talking about eggs: "A ...
15
votes
3answers
1k views

Where is the subject in "as was traditional for unmarried women"?

My senior English teacher was a tad bit confused where the subject for was is in this sentence: As was traditional for unmarried women, Jane lived at home her entire life.
5
votes
3answers
16k views

What's the subject of "There is my biscuit!" ? And how about "There is one biscuit left"?

What's the subject, grammatically speaking, of these sentences? There is my biscuit! My biscuit is there! There is one biscuit left. I don't really know how to analyze these. The following ...
10
votes
1answer
3k views

How do I determine subject and subject complement in "A side-effect is the spread of commercialese to other domains."?

Consider this example: Commercialese is an instrument of art, designed to enrich and invigorate our language—surely you will all agree with this—, and we should encourage newcomers to learn ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

"as bad at English as me" vs. "as bad at English as I"

He was almost as bad at English as me. He was almost as bad at English as I. The first one sounds better as-is, but not when you change the second one to He was almost as bad at English as I was. ...
1
vote
1answer
13k views

"The number of residents has grown" vs. "the number of residents have grown" [duplicate]

Duplicate: “A number of students” vs. “the number of students” “Number of attempts per question is unlimited” or “are limited”? “A number of questions has been asked” or “have been asked”? ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

"They interviewed several candidates who/whom he thought had the experience he required." [duplicate]

They interviewed several candidates who he thought had the experience and qualifications he required. My test prep book says this should be "who" because of the subordinate clause's predicate: ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Subject predicate inversion due to negation

I was reading about subject predicate inversion inverted word-order... is also used in clauses introduced by a negative or restrictive clause element. In the following example, the initial ...
3
votes
3answers
85k views

"The one who wants" vs. "the one who want"

I am getting confused with usage of 's' with verb- consider following 2 sentences- I am the one who wants to stay with you. I am the one who want to stay with you. According to me, first ...
30
votes
5answers
368k views

"I and someone", "me and someone" or "I and someone we" [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When do I use “I” instead of “me?” A friend of mine asked me for advice about an e-mail he was writing. There was a sentence like this: I and my ...
7
votes
1answer
2k views

Is it acceptable to omit "I" when it's the subject? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it acceptable to begin a declarative sentence with “Am”? Is it correct English to omit I from the beginning of a sentence when it's clearly implied? For example... How ...
5
votes
1answer
2k views

"Years of experience that keeps us safe." vs "Years of experience that keep us safe."

If you've ever seen Mythbusters, you know that all episodes contain at least one safety disclaimer. Having recently rewatched several episodes, I've noticed that some disclaimers have Adam saying, "...
1
vote
1answer
509 views

Subject of gerund phrase [duplicate]

Me getting a hangover is nothing like her getting a hangover. - I'd rather contemplate you singing than him singing. Is this grammatically correct?
4
votes
3answers
9k views

Can words like "what" be the subject of a sentence?

In a question like "Who hears a noise?", is the subject of the sentence who? I can think of a few tests for subjects like: "the subject is the phrase that inverts with the auxiliary to form a ...
3
votes
3answers
6k views

Is there no subject in a sentence like "Under the tree is a dog"?

I was trying to find out sentences without a subject, only object, and I came across this where the poster gives following sentences as an example Under the tree is a dog. Next to the park stands ...
3
votes
2answers
17k views

Does the verb after 'set of' agree with 'set' or the plural noun that follows?

Does the verb after 'a set of + plural noun' agree with 'set' or 'noun'? For example: 'Law is a set of rules that govern/governs society.'
12
votes
2answers
8k views

What happened first: "ye"/"you" merging to "you", or "thou"/"thee" falling out of common use?

Simple subject "I": I went. Replacing it with "me": Me went. That sounds strikingly wrong. We use it for fake "caveman talk". However, there was a time when it worked like this: 1st person ...
2
votes
5answers
78k views

Plural followed by singular - "have" or "has"?

I'm wondering which of the following is correct: Guns are an invention that have had an enormous impact on African history. or Guns are an invention that has had an enormous impact on African ...
6
votes
2answers
9k views

'One out of three people thinks' or 'one out of three people think'? [duplicate]

Could someone please explain to me which of these sentences is correct and why? Only one out of three respondents (29%) thinks otherwise. Only one out of three respondents (29%) think ...
2
votes
5answers
4k views

What is the grammatical difference behind "is interesting" and "is interested"?

I am a native English speaker, yet I cannot explain to a non-native speaker why I say: I am interested in history. as well as History is interesting to me. Why is it "is interesting" when ...
0
votes
1answer
65 views

On the Use of "nothing"

the statement 'nothing can be known' seems straightforward, right? 'nothing' is the subject, in which case the statement can be taken to mean that not a single thing can be known. and yet, is there ...
5
votes
1answer
555 views

Object vs Subject?

Consider the following sentence: "Even during the simple occurrence of him and me standing next to each other makes me notice that he's taller than me." Is him and me correct? Should it be he and ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Is “It must be him with whom you enjoy doing your assignments, not me” correct? [duplicate]

I’d like all of you to please consider the following sentence: It must be him with whom you enjoy doing your assignments, not me. I have known that after 'to be' verb pronouns words take the ...
2
votes
2answers
162 views

On the structure of "search for weapons and bands of pro-Hussein fighters still holding out"

I came across the following expression: The primary task of many American troops in Baghdad has been to search for weapons and bands of pro-Hussein fighters still holding out. This is from a ...
2
votes
0answers
516 views

Comma between subject and predicate (when predicate is noun clause ending in verb)

Here are a few quotes that may or may not be faithful to their authors, in which the subject is a noun clause ending in a verb followed by a comma: "What can be shown, cannot be said." "What gets ...
1
vote
1answer
79 views

Subject in sentence with only object pronoun

Let us go is a correct construction in the English language and definitely not: Let we go However, the question is: since us is an object-case pronoun, what is the subject of this sentence?
1
vote
2answers
366 views

The subject of "and" in a compound statement

I'm wondering the subject of the second clause in a sentence like You should tell him to get up and get back to work The subject of get back to work is ambiguous to me. It could be interpreted as ...
1
vote
1answer
766 views

Is it "me" or "I" and why? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When do I use “I” instead of “me?”   John, Valencia, and I (or me)? I found a photo of Sarah, Thomas, James and I? OR I found a photo of Sarah, ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

Just me, a schizophrenic and a petty arsonist [duplicate]

Just me, a schizophrenic and a petty arsonist. How many people are there in the above sentence? Is it ambiguous?
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Grammatically, what is "It" in the following sentence?

I'm currently working at a private academy in Korea, and my boss just asked me a real head-scratcher. In the sentence: It doesn't have to be hot and humid for players to lose too much water from ...
-1
votes
1answer
665 views

"Whom" or "who" where the referent is both subject and object?

I understand there has been so much on this topic but I am still confused. I get that if the person is the subject it is who and anything else is whom. However, I'm really struggling to work out this ...
9
votes
3answers
8k views

"A guy whose job is to" vs "a guy whose job it is to"?

I've been hearing the phrase "whose job it is to" quite often lately. Consider these two sentences: We have a guy whose job is to clean windows. We have a guy whose job it is to clean ...
13
votes
7answers
39k views

Which is correct: "If it were I" or "If it were me"?

I'm fairly sure it's the former, but it sounds even more stilted than the usual cases in which "I" is less common, but more correct.
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Confusing rule about subject-verb agreement

I am currently working through "The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation" by Jane Straus. In the section on subject-verb agreement the author describes a rule for sentences that begin with "there" or "...
5
votes
6answers
3k views

What's the best way to find the subject in a sentence?

What's the best way to find the subject in a sentence? How do you define a subject? I am especially curious about such cases, in which the subject seems to be represented by more than one word: The ...
10
votes
6answers
1k views

What's the Subject in: 'And up here in the corner is me'

If two people are looking at a photo, and one of them pointing out the different people says: And up here in the corner is me. ... what is the Subject of the sentence? The phrase up here in the ...
7
votes
4answers
3k views

What is the predicate in "Is he happy?"

In most theories of grammar, sentences can be broken into smaller chunks called phrases and these phrases can be broken into smaller chunks, smaller phrases still. So in the sentence: He is happy. ...
6
votes
2answers
5k views

'As can be seen ...' <--- Can English have a tensed clause without a Subject?

Considering the rule that every finite clause in English must always have a subject, I was wondering what the subject of the first clause in this sentence is: As can be seen from the figures, the ...
5
votes
3answers
3k views

S-V agreement: It is not clear what is/are meant by A and B

In the following sentence, the verb “are” strikes me as odd. In paragraph 6, it is not clear what are meant by “the front unit” and “the central element”. It seems that “. . . it is not clear ...
3
votes
1answer
880 views

with/without + pronoun (me vs. my) + gerund-participial phrase

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 461) has this section: (f) Subject of clausal complement of with/without Pronouns in this position normally appear in accusative case: [16] i We ...
0
votes
1answer
4k views

"He who" as an indirect object [duplicate]

Is the following incorrect? Return it to he who gave it to you. Presuming it is, how would I correct it? (without resorting to saying "to the person who gave it to you," which is somewhat ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

"Myself" as a single subject

How do we use myself as the only subject of a sentence? For example I once heard some people saying Myself am to be blamed. Is this grammatically correct? How is it different from I am to be blamed?
4
votes
2answers
7k views

Are you comfortable with who(m) he is?

Are you comfortable with him? (correct) Are you comfortable with whom he is? (??) You're comfortable with whom he is. (??) Are you comfortable with who he is? (??) You're comfortable with whom?...
3
votes
1answer
647 views

Which houses (are/is) this road connected to? [duplicate]

We are having a debate at my work on if "are" or "is" is the right word to use in the above sentence (actually, a similar sentence which is work-related). I am aware that there are other ways of ...
3
votes
3answers
932 views

Does "Predicate" includes object, complement and modifiers?

I'm currently studying the "Sentence Structure" for the English language. I've found varied information in this regard. Some sources says that the sentence consist of five components: Subject + ...
3
votes
2answers
760 views

Omission of subject

Is it correct to omit the subject of a subordinate clause if it coincides with the subject of the main clause, for example, I felt drowsy when (I) woke up? Can you give me a reference to the rules?...