Questions tagged [structure]

Questions pertaining to the structure of phrases and sentences.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
3
votes
0answers
32 views

Can we say “I am friends”? If not, why can we say “I’ve been friends with…”? [duplicate]

I’ve been friends with the Murkets for twenty years. This is a sentence from Longman Dictionary. How can we explain this? I thought when the pronoun was "I" we must say a friend not friends. I ...
1
vote
2answers
50 views

What is the leaving out of a repeated word called? “He left in a fast car and a filthy mood.”

He left in a fast car and a filthy mood. Here, the second "in" has been left out as the first "in" can serve both parts of the sentence (I assume), but what is this device called - if indeed, it has ...
2
votes
1answer
39 views

Self-Questioning in TV interviews [duplicate]

More and more in TV interviews -- and only on TV, by the way, never in "real" life -- I hear people using what I call, for lack of any other name, "Self-Questioning.". Example: "Do I regret saying ...
0
votes
2answers
133 views

Rewording a sentence [closed]

How else can I reword the following There are few better ways Here is the sentence I am using this in There are few better ways to ring in the new year than with a bigger monthly budget.
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Meaning of “It will be but …” [duplicate]

The structure used is strange for me : It will be but a pitiful plastiche What does " It will be but " means? And the phrase pitiful plastiche is negative, isnt it?
4
votes
2answers
16k views

Is this sentence correct grammatically?

I've been told by a person that the sentence below is incorrect grammatically and it does not make any sense. Specifically, that person told me that the part ''could do'' is wrong. ''Could do'', for ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

use of “be -ed verb” structure [duplicate]

Could someone explain the grammar to me - use of "be changed" in The report recommends that radar screens be changed. Why it is used like this? What does this usage should express? Where (under what ...
0
votes
1answer
272 views

The precise meaning of “less to … than to …”?

Alan's purpose was less to X than to Y. (X and Y are two verbs) Does the above structure mean that Alan's purpose was not to X but it was to Y. or instead it means that Alan had two purposes,...
1
vote
2answers
5k views

the usage of “such that”

I looked up the usage of "such that" in the dictionary, it says: "such that, so that: used to express purpose or result: power such that it was effortless" if the subordinate clause following "such ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

Sentence structure : comma + adjective problem

These make up the entire content of the mind, and Herbart saw them not as static but dynamic elements, able to move and interact with one another. I could not understand exactly how the "able to ...
1
vote
0answers
76 views

“Seem all to” vs. “all seem to”

The men seem all to understand the situation. The men all seem to understand the situation. Both "seem all to" and "all seem to" can be frequently found on the Internet, with the latter being ...
0
votes
1answer
394 views

“far longer” vs. “for far longer”

We thus can keep their trust far longer. We thus can keep their trust for far longer. Are 1 and 2 both correct and meaning the same thing?
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Possessive Noun Apostrophes

I'm struggling a bit with an apostrophe question - I have the clause, "Using the example of the singer Michael Jackson’s death", which I'm pretty sure isn't right as there should probably be a comma ...
-2
votes
1answer
56 views

What name should I ring? [closed]

I just wanted to ask whether the question in the title sounds "native-like" enough or if there is a better way to say it, especially something less colloquial. The context would be following: I am ...
1
vote
1answer
82 views

“Have our minds made up” vs. “have made up our minds”?

This could be a more general question. What is the difference in the meanings of the two following structures? Have/has something/somebody + past participle and Have/has + past ...
0
votes
2answers
195 views

“what that amounts to” vs. “to what that amounts”

It is clear that A degrades the value of B but it is not clear to what such degradation amounts. I am trying to say that the degradation is for sure but we are not sure what [the amount of] that ...
0
votes
1answer
182 views

Does “of complete honesty” mean exactly the same as “completely honest”?

The structure to be + of + noun is usually taken to mean the same as to be + the relevant adjective. For example, The speech is of complete honesty. means the same as The speech is completely ...
1
vote
2answers
863 views

How Can You Describe Someone Leaving A Room In an Unwilling, Emotional Manner? [closed]

I'm writing a short story about a young girl that has emotional issues, such as severe depression and anorexia. I'm trying to come up with a word that best expresses her disinterest and unwillingness ...
1
vote
0answers
63 views

In the parlance of the time is the old switcheroo? [closed]

I was watching The Twilight Zone last night and I came across the following cool quote from Rod Serling in the closing narration of the Dummy episode: "What's known in the parlance of the time is the ...
0
votes
3answers
2k views

Is “They are trying to push their responsibility out” correct?

I'm trying to say that “they” don’t want to take on what they have been asked.  Instead of doing that, they are giving it to other people (or trying to).  If I say, They are trying to push their ...
1
vote
1answer
285 views

Sentence Structure habit / question

I frequently find my writing style to be less than optimal when it comes to the structure of my sentences. For example, when I ask questions most of my sentences resemble the following: Are we able ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

“To have someone do something” What does this really mean?

As a native Portuguese speaker, it's kind of hard for me to really understand what the structure "to have someone do something" means. For example in the following sentence: I had him pick me up at ...
3
votes
2answers
545 views

Negating a clause

This is my first post, I really like this site! Basically I have problems to distinguish the negation of a verb that is applied to a clause, and a verb that is applied to a negation of a clause. The ...
1
vote
2answers
192 views

How well does this sentence structure work?

I'm proofreading someone else's video game script, and I'm having a bit of trouble with her use of absolute phrases. She likes using absolute phrases in her sentence structures, like so: My fingers ...
0
votes
1answer
126 views

I'm confused by the following sentence, can somebody explain to me about its sentence structure?

"She visits weekly to verify addresses, and check residents have registered all their details in accordance with the law". What does it really want to illustrate? Does it mean that she checks to ...
0
votes
1answer
118 views

Can a sentence be described as compound (rather than complex) purely based on the placement of the conjunction?

For example: "Though he was late for class, he walked slowly down the corridor." This is considered a complex sentence as "Though he was late for class" is a dependent clause. However, I can change ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

Usage: modifier with “of the”

I have never come across a good explanation about when to use, let's say: the door of the house or the house door In the plural, I get even more confused: the doors of the houses or the house ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Can I say “a great…, greater than…”? [closed]

I have written the following sentence: "I intend to put a great effort into preparing for the XXX, greater than that expected from XXX". Is this sentence grammatically correct and appropriately ...
0
votes
1answer
81 views

undergoes oxidation reactions to other compounds that are eliminated by the body

I'm reading chemistry book and have found this sentence which I could not understand even though I know the meaning of oxidize which means to combine with oxygen and the meaning of eliminate which ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

That machines can now play chess very well has been established [closed]

dose that mean that the machine can now play chess better than what was expected when it was being designed ? This is The text On the other hand, other AI researchers have achieved spectacular ...
1
vote
1answer
807 views

So, we don't have “can have + PP” in English, do we? but we do have “can't have +PP”, don't we?

Modal verbs like can, could, may, might,.... are very difficult & arbitrary. According to this site: can't have + past participle: I'm fairly sure this wasn't true Ex: She can't have ...
-1
votes
2answers
52 views

Order of parties when using “__ Introduction to __” [closed]

When writing that blank is being introduced to blank, is there a formal rule for which party is supposed to be placed before "introduction to" and which party is placed after? In this instance, this ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

Hear about your father passing away or hear about your father'passing

Would you explain for me the different between " hear about your father passing away" and " ...your father's passing. In my opinion, it is reasonable tho use " ... your father's passing because ...
-1
votes
3answers
7k views

“One of my family” VS “one of my family members”

Which of these is correct? He is one of my family. He is one of my family members. Would there be a better way to put this?
3
votes
4answers
673 views

Wh- Question for “as young as five”

There is this statement: Children as young as five are able to take the test. What is the question the answer to which is "as young as five"? Is this structure correct? How young an age are ...
-1
votes
1answer
103 views

The usage of infinitive (supine) in the sentence

Consider this sentence: He carried the taxed grain in large ship in 1863 to pass the water channel with the sea men and officials to leave the daily situation as the record in simply ways like ...
1
vote
0answers
467 views

Is this sentence “Member of winning team from 5 teams in ABC class.” correct? [closed]

I want to put this under 'Achievements' category on my resume. I am not sure if I should use "Member of winning team from 5 teams in ABC class." or "Member of winning team among 5 teams in ABC class." ...
2
votes
4answers
437 views

Is the structure “restart + -ing” correct?

The expression to start doing something is quite common. E.g., I started reading the book last week. However, I could not find a similar structure using restart instead of start. I.e., assuming I ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Wrong English and right English [closed]

I am doing Masters in English Literature, In one of the books I read that there is nothing like 'Wrong English', there are so many dialects in the wrold that each type of English is correct English. ...
-2
votes
1answer
596 views

Do I split the same character speaking twice successively into two separate paragraphs?

I have a character speaking twice in one paragraph with no one speaking in between. However, I'm not sure whether it should stay together in one paragraph or be split into two. I feel like the gap ...
1
vote
1answer
599 views

Possessive-gerund/ sentence structure

Here's an alternative/clearer version of my original question: Consider the following sentence: Instead of his being stationed on a plank, I want him on a pedestal. This shows the possessive ...
2
votes
0answers
6k views

it seems to be that? [closed]

I was curious about the original structure of the sentences. It seems correct. Original version: It seems to be correct. Well, it is a very well known fact. But what about the ones that ...
2
votes
4answers
1k views

Where do I put this phrase in a phrase structure tree?

I am not sure where to put the AdvP in this sentence when drawing a phrase structure tree. This is the sentence I would like to create the tree for: "The car Sam bought last week won the big race." ...
7
votes
1answer
3k views

“We must away ere break of day”: What is this grammar? Is it alive?

This phrase appears in a song Tolkien wrote, and what was the main theme of The Hobbit movie: Far over the Misty Mountains cold To dungeons deep and caverns old We must away ere break of day ...
-1
votes
1answer
93 views

Is there a term for this phenomenon?

I've been wondering for a while now whether there is a word (or linguistic term) that specifically refers to an instance where a clause can be part of either the clause before it or the clause after ...
1
vote
2answers
323 views

Future-In-The-Past Form of 'Should [subject]…, or should [subject]…?'-Type Sentences?

     Consider a present-tense sentence in which a story's narrator expresses a situation in which the character in focus is considering which of two alternative choices he or ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

“In which” or “of which”? [closed]

I was writing the following sentence and became lost in thought. I wasn't sure whether to use "of which" or "in which". Are either correct? If not, what is? Strict-liability crimes are crimes [of/...
1
vote
0answers
2k views

The use of “of” at the start of a sentence

Of the tropical storms that occur each year in the North Atlantic, only about five, on the average, are powerful enough to be called hurricanes. Why does that "of" appear at the beginning of the ...
0
votes
1answer
420 views

… form the foundation of a child’s development throughout their growing up. [closed]

Can I use the above structure... i.e. 'throughout their growing up'
2
votes
4answers
535 views

How to say a particular author is the only one you've read every book of?

Charles Dickens is an author. I have read every book he's written, and he's the only author who I can say this about. If I wanted to express this fact, in one single and elegant sentence, what would ...