Questions tagged [strong-verbs]

Questions about verbs that mark their past tense and past participle by changing their stem vowel (“ablaut”) instead of adding a dental suffix. Examples include swim/swam/swum, sing/sang/sung, see/saw/seen, sit/sat, bid/bade/bidden, hold/held, find/found, fight/fought, come/came, run/ran, get/got/gotten, think/thought, grow/grew/grown, freeze/froze/frozen, break/broke/broken, shake/shook/shaken, give/gave/given, ride/rode/ridden, and drive/drove/driven.

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Any precedent for the word "storn"?

When reading an article on programming languages this morning, I came across this interesting verb formation (emphasis mine): Any Brainfuck program can be easily converted to Boolfuck. The process is ...
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  • 101
0 votes
0 answers
48 views

How do you describe bits of hay floating in the air? [duplicate]

I need to describe bits of hay puffing into the air from a rusty ute when it comes to a stop. Not sure how to describe it.
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1 vote
1 answer
133 views

How to determine Weak and Strong verbs in Old English (Anglo-Saxon)

How to determine whether a verb is a weak verb or a strong verb in Old English ?
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2 votes
1 answer
950 views

Is “stang” so out of use it is widely considered an incorrect form of “stung”?

I have a sentence in a short story which wants to use 'stang' instead of 'stung'. Dictionaries that include 'stang' say it is 'obsolete'. Would you as a reader accept it? a shriek so fierce her ...
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9 votes
2 answers
1k views

Why does the past tense form of sleep have a weak suffix?

Meaning: to sleep is a strong verb in the Germanic languages. While I'm quite aware that strong vs weak anything has very little bearing on modern English, this is still something that puzzles me. ...
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  • 99
9 votes
4 answers
12k views

How common are "arrove" and "arriven" (vs. "arrived")?

So to start things off, I know that the proper past tense of the word arrive would be the word arrived. And that sounds fine for me if you are singularly referring to yourself, such as: I have ...
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2 votes
3 answers
15k views

Glided, Glid or Glode [closed]

Dictionaries say that the past tense of glide is glided. ‘a few gondolas glided past’ But in my dialect, I say glode and sometimes glid and most people I know also do but apparently glided is ...
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6 votes
2 answers
28k views

Struck vs Stricken

Is struck or stricken correct in these sentences? The house was stricken / struck by lightning. The house had been stricken / struck by lightning. He was stricken / struck by grief, cancer, etc. ...
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  • 2,353
18 votes
4 answers
31k views

What is the past tense form of s--t [closed]

Are shit, shat, and shitted all correct and fine to use as the past tense of shit? After a little bit of searching it seems that they are, with shat being Old English. Is any form more common in ...
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  • 373
8 votes
3 answers
4k views

Regular vs. irregular verbs

I recall an English teacher explaining that verbs that change vowels during tense changes were called 'regular' and those that added '-ed' in the past tense were 'irregular'. This seemed counter-...
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-1 votes
4 answers
2k views

Why is there no move to introduce regular versions of verb-forms as acceptable alternatives of irregular ones?

The English language has a huge number of irregular verbs(~470). This is significantly more than other languages e.g. French (~130), German (~200) Irregular verbs make the English language ...
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  • 183
20 votes
4 answers
6k views

Where did "snuck" come from?

Ages ago, I remember typing snuck into a word processor and being surprised to see it flagged as not a word. My current computer seems to be okay with it and my local dictionary has this in its ...
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  • 35k
11 votes
3 answers
74k views

Would you use the word "swum" these days?

Would you use the word "swum" these days? I mean, grammatically, it is the past participle of the verb "to swim", but it seems to me that no one uses it anymore. If it's the case, how would You ...
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  • 8,863
10 votes
2 answers
3k views

Origin of different past tenses for verbs with the same endings?

Why do we have a situation where the past of "to blow" is "blew", but of "to glow" is "glowed"? And don't say "flew" if you mean "it flowed". The poem Lovers, by Phoebe Cary has many examples of these....
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