Questions tagged [stress]

Stress refers to which syllable or syllables in a word or phrase are "accented" or receive the most emphasis in their pronunciation.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
3
votes
0answers
32 views

Why can't we say “… of its”?

In a comment on the question Is there any rule regarding when not to use the pattern "noun phrase + of + possessive pronoun"?, such as "a friend of his", John Lawler writes First ...
1
vote
2answers
57 views

-IZE: unstressed (though strong)

According to the Longman Pronunciation Dictionary -IZE /aɪz/: This suffix is unstressed (though strong) in Received Pronunciation and General American, but sometimes stressed in other varieties"....
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Each sentence is emphasising a different message depending on the word stress?

I need to talk to our lecturer tomorrow. I need to talk to our lecturer tomorrow. I need to talk to our lecturer tomorrow. I need to talk to our lecturer tomorrow. I need to talk to our lecturer ...
-3
votes
3answers
101 views

Why is chocolate pronounced as CHOK-LATE and not CHO-KO-LATE? [closed]

So there are many words in which one syllable gets reduced. For example, chocolate could be pronounced as CHO-KO-LATE but instead it's pronounced as CHOK-LATE, it's now 2 syllable word. Another ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Reason for pronunciation differences between different meanings of offense

At least in American English, the word offense has two different pronunciations used for two different meanings: I took offense at his joke The team's offense is quite good How did this ...
6
votes
1answer
2k views

What is the correct pronunciation of “elytra”?

The word elytra refers to one of the anterior wings in beetles and some other insects that serve to protect the posterior pair of functional wings according to Merriam-Webster. The word is also ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

Syllables and word stressing [closed]

I am an english learner but when it comes to syllables and streesing, a lot of words give me problems in pronoucing them. When I was taught syllables and streesing they told me that every word has ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

Is the repetition of a pronoun instead of stressing it possible?

In English it is usual to stress a personal pronoun or a noun so as to introduce a departure from the preceding spell of conversation in which is mentioned another agent in relation to the same ...
-1
votes
1answer
77 views

Should the first instance of an author-made word in a work use an accent mark? [closed]

If an author makes up proper nouns for their text, for example, Bilgebauth, should the very first instance in the text be typeset with an accent: Bilgebáuth to inform the reader of the proper stress ...
0
votes
2answers
62 views

How do different stresses change the meaning of the sentence “I don't know”

If one says "I don't know" in 3 different ways, like, when they stress "I", "don't" and "know" respectively. How does the meaning of this sentence change?
2
votes
1answer
79 views

How does the pitch change through the phrase “a gorgeous young model”?

When one pronounces the phrase a gorgeous young model in a very normal way (without any special stress to emphasize a specific meaning), which word will be said in the highest pitch, which word ...
1
vote
1answer
310 views

How to stress Phrasal verb?

Many people told me that the particle is stressed when it comes to Intransitive Phrasal Verb. (like "warm up" in this video https://youtu.be/9I1DBOJERns?t=3) (Text: Winter's over, the weather's ...
0
votes
1answer
101 views

Why is pianist usually stressed on the /pi/?

"Pianist" is usually pronounced /ˈpiənɪst/, with /piˈænɪst/ as an acceptable variant only in the US and Canada, according to Wiktionary. I'm not sure why the pronunciation /ˈpiənɪst/ would be more ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Which syllable is primarily stressed in the word “television”?

I was taught to stress the first syllable of "television", but some dictionaries stress the syllable before -sion. My other question is "Does stressing VI before -sion exist in AmE?
1
vote
2answers
1k views

for words ending in “ing”, what parts are stressed?

For words ending in the -ing suffix, is the suffix stressed? Unstressed? Does adding the -ing suffix affect the stress of the other syllables? Example: (u is untressed, ' is stressed) Deteriorate is (...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

Is there any case when it's correct to pronounce the word “police” with the stress on the first syllable?

Is there any case when it's correct to pronounce the word police with the stress on the first syllable: /ˈpəlis/?
1
vote
1answer
58 views

Sentence stress

I'm struggling to understand the sentence stress in the following sentences: Why don’t we watch a comedy film? I'm pretty sure that 'don't', 'watch', 'comedy', and 'film' are stressed; why is a wh-...
4
votes
2answers
140 views

Should “ohmmeter” be stressed on the first or second syllables, or both?

Question: Which syllable or syllables are stressed in the word ohmmeter? Context: I tried to say the word ohmmeter out loud today and realized I am unsure of the correct pronunciation. The double m ...
3
votes
1answer
504 views

Where is the stress of the noun “Portuguese”?

Studying suffixes I've learned that "-ESE" is a strong suffix, therefore it holds the main stress when it's added to a word (e.g. China -> Chinese; Japan -> Japanese; journal -> journalese; etc.). ...
2
votes
1answer
63 views

If a speaker clearly emphasizes a word or a term, should it be written down in quotation marks?

If a speaker clearly emphasizes a word or a term, should it be written down in quotation marks? e.g. Everyone's so intimidated by "big data."
1
vote
1answer
90 views

Correct stress when pronouncing “covet”

When pronounce word "covet" should I give stress to "o" or to "e"? I searched Emma Saying channel for this word and there are two videos with different pronunciation so I'm not sure if this source is ...
1
vote
3answers
708 views

Why is the accent on “petrol” and “patrol” different?

Petrol and patrol are written very similarly, though completely and obviously different in meaning. My question here is actually about the accent on these words. Why is petrol stressed on PE, and ...
0
votes
1answer
97 views

How would changing the stress position in descriptive phrases change the meaning?

Usually in a phrase composed of an adjective followed by a noun, the noun gets the most stress, and in a phrasal verb like (go on, sit down, stand up) the preposition gets the most stress. However ...
2
votes
1answer
318 views

How can I predict the stressed syllable in proper/brand/trademark/foreign nouns?

I often encounter nouns that I hear of for the first time, and I can not determine which syllable to stress. Unfortunately, I can not find most of these nouns in dictionaries to check the stressed ...
0
votes
1answer
71 views

How to stress the subject in a question beginning with “why”?

English isn't my native language, so my question might seem dumb to you, but I wanna be sure. I'm writing some fiction, but I have some problems with syntax... Here's the question at issue : "why is ...
2
votes
1answer
733 views

What is the real pronunciation of “postman”? [duplicate]

I can see that the word postman is pronounced as /pəʊs(t)mən/ commonly, where you can’t hear the vowel in the ‑man syllable. But sometimes it is pronounced /pəʊs(t)mæn/ — with a noticeable /æ/ vowel ...
2
votes
1answer
257 views

Syllable stress in “yogurt”

It is believed that word yougurt has Turkish etymology, and in Turkish phonology stess "is complicated" (you can listen different Turkish native speakers at forvo.com). Why in English yougurt has ...
-1
votes
2answers
174 views

Determining the stressed word in a sentence when using possessive

In the following sentence, which word should receive the stress: This is the dog’s collar. I fully understand that in different contexts, different words will be stressed. But I’m asking about the ...
0
votes
1answer
98 views

Is there any evidence for “altercate” ever having been pronounced with stress on the second syllable?

In modern English, polysyllabic verbs ending in -ate are regularly stressed on the third-to-last syllable. (There are some (possible) exceptions, such as incarnate, impregnate, and elongate.) But it ...
0
votes
2answers
91 views

Progress: verbs pronounced differently in transitive and intransitive forms - pro'gress vs progre'ss

uncovered during an informal English conversational lesson today, according to my (1970s) Concise Oxford Dictionary, the vi and vt forms of 'progress' do have separate entries, different pronunciation,...
0
votes
2answers
618 views

Do syllables only contain one vowel? Also Some questions on word stress

For this word: ○ recommend ○/ˌrekəˈmend/ 1) /rekə/ is the first syllable. Does it contain two vowels? ■ e is a vowel ■ ə is a vowel I thought syllables can only contain one vowel? 2) the [ ']...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Word Formation: Noun Suffixes and their Spelling and Stress Shift Rules

I've been having a real hard time trying to gather information about word formation in English, more specifically about the rules involving suffixes that turn verbs and adjectives into nouns. But not ...
11
votes
1answer
5k views

How has “Boadicea” been pronounced at different points in history?

In English, the name of the famous Queen of the Iceni has been written many ways (there is some discussion in Boudica and Her Stories: Narrative Transformations of a Warrior Queen, by Carolyn D. ...
46
votes
2answers
12k views

What's up with the pronunciation of “awry”?

I was just watching a show where someone said "awry". I have noted this numerous times before and wondered, but now I just have to understand: Why is it pronounced as "aww-rye" [low tone on the aww] ...
2
votes
3answers
364 views

What sort of stress is isochronous in English?

English is oft said to be stress timed, so that strongly stressed syllables should occur at (roughly) the same intervals. For the purposes of this question, please assume that. Is a syllable ...
1
vote
0answers
63 views

Which side of “as well as” is emphasised?

I am curious about which side of the expression is stressed when "as well as" is used as a conjunction. For example: brave as well as loyal In this case, which adjective sounds highlighted more? ...
0
votes
2answers
642 views

Why does the stress fall on the antepenult of “carCInogen” but on the preantepenult of “halLUcinogen”?

I note that "carcinogen" might also be stressed on its preantepenult, in which case the question would become why the two words should have their stress so far away from the end when a stress nearer ...
1
vote
1answer
935 views

Which syllable is stressed in the English word 'romance'?

Whenever I google it the results are mostly about Romance languages. Google itself gives two versions r'omance and rom'ance. Are they used interchangeably for both the noun and the verb or r'omance ...
2
votes
1answer
647 views

A puzzling example of sentence stress on the preposition “to”

This is a question about sentence stress. The example is taken from a unit of Michael Vaughan's "Test your Pronunciation". The Unit is entitled "Predicting highlighting shift in dialogue". Here is ...
2
votes
1answer
311 views

Is stress-timed rhythm true?

It is said that English has stress-timed rhythm. Is it true? because it sounds that syllables with stress doesn't necessarily get a beat and make isochrony. If it is true, I would like to hear how you ...
1
vote
1answer
223 views

Are the mid-stressed English words always pronounced the same?

This has been a question in my mind for quite a long time, and I can't help but wonder are all words with stress in their second part pronounced the same all the time? For example, OK, because, etc. I ...
0
votes
1answer
119 views

“What IS it?” versus “What is IT?” [closed]

I would like to know which word in the questions below is stressed in normal converstion. What is it? What is that? What do you do? Where do you live? How about in other circumstances?
3
votes
3answers
5k views

How to stress the difference between 13 and 30; 14 and 40; etc.?

I've searched this site for questions containing both thirteen and thirty, fourteen and forty, etc. up until I found this question about seventy. Most of the comments seem to be about using "...
4
votes
0answers
69 views

Is it possible to use 'me' as a possessive in English sentences? [duplicate]

I just found that the word 'me' was used as a possessive in sentences of spoken English, in the movie "Harry Potter": "I'm half and half. Me dads a muggle, mum's a witch." Generally, isn't it ...
6
votes
1answer
632 views

/ɪ/ sound when not stressed

I've seen that some words in English are pronounced with the /ɪ/ sound when the vowel is not stressed. Some examples include: pocket /ˈpɒkɪt/, comet /ˈkɒmɪt/. But hundred /ˈhʌndrəd/. Is there any ...
5
votes
4answers
956 views

What are the historical justifications for first-syllable stress in the word “orthoepy”?

Funnily enough, the word orthoepy (or orthoëpy) meaning “(the study of) correct (or standard) pronunciation” has no single established correct pronunciation: it may be stressed on either the first or ...
1
vote
1answer
277 views

British English word stress in sentence

Where should I put stress in the sentence below? If only I knew who it was from
4
votes
1answer
482 views

Since English is a stress-timed language, why have poets chosen to write in iambic pentameter?

Since English is a stress-timed language, why have poets chosen to write in iambic pentameter? Doesn't the language already have a natural rhythm without resorting to meter? And isn't that natural ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the poetic meter of 'O.K.'? [closed]

Is the acronym "O.K." generally pronounced as an iamb or a trochee? Or is it context-dependent?
6
votes
1answer
333 views

Why are diacritics used in words that apparently don't need them? Is it some sort of poetic license? [duplicate]

In his poem Spring and Fall, Gerard Manley Hopkins uses diacritics where one would normally not see them. Does anyone know why? Here is the poem: Márgarét, áre you gríeving Over Goldengrove ...