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Questions tagged [stative-verbs]

A stative verb describes a state of being, as opposed to a dynamic verb which describes action.

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84 views

The book is/lies/sits on the table

You're describing a book's location at the moment of speaking. a. The book is on the table (right now). b. The book lies on the table (right now). c. The book sits on the table (right now)...
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1answer
47 views

Which one is the right form of Stative verb “stand”?

I am looking for an explanation why, She stands in the shade of a tree.❌(wrong) She is standing in the shade of the tree.✅(correct) but, The temple is standing in the heart of the city.❌(wrong) ...
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2answers
631 views

What tense is “I am broken”?

This seems to be some type of present tense, but guides to verb tense only give the following two options: present progressive tense and present perfect tense. Present progressive tense uses a present ...
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1answer
400 views

Which verbs cannot be used in the progressive form in any case?

We know for a fact that if a stative predicate is used in the progressive form, it will change the meaning of the sentence, e.g. 'I have a car' / 'I'm having a headache', where in the former a ...
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4answers
558 views

Does “I like my new car” express a permanent or temporary state?

We all know that Simple Present is normally used for "more permanent state" & Present Continuous for "more temporary state" (Source) She lives with her parents. We use the present simple ...
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4answers
636 views

How To Make a Statement Always in Present Tense? [closed]

I am trying to create an affirmation that is in the present tense infinitely, and never expires(or incantation if your a Tony Robbins fan ). How can a statement be in the present tense infinitely? A ...
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2answers
1k views

Can “I was married two years ago” have more than one meaning?

The simple past tense has various uses; here are two: First Use: Simple past is used to show a completed action in the past and we know the time that the action completed. I saw a movie ...
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1answer
89 views

Why state verbs are seen as not having any definite beginning or end? [duplicate]

People say: • English verbs can be placed in various classes depending on their meaning. In other words, they can be classified “semantically.” The most important of these classes are: event ...
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1answer
281 views

Why “missing”, but not “needing” or “wanting”?

The following sentence is OK: The table is missing a leg. But the next two sentences sound a bit off (to my native ear, at least): The campaign is needing support. I am wanting an apple. ...
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0answers
328 views

Is “doubt” a stative verb

The worst thing “is doubting” yourself. Is the use of this verb phrase “is doubting” correct? Many grammar books say “doubt” is a stative verb and cannot be used in the progressive form but I have ...
3
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1answer
833 views

Using stative verb “want” in progressive

Some days ago I found an interesting question. As I know we can use some stative verbs in continuos with a difference in meaning. There are two sentences: We'd been wanting to go to New Zealand ...
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2answers
103 views

Why not “that hears disgusting” [duplicate]

So, why isn’t hear an action verb, like its sensory siblings? I can write, “That feels disgusting” and substitute feels with looks, smells, and tastes, but “That hears disgusting” doesn’t make sense; ...
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1answer
186 views

Are “Get” or “Grasp” stative or dynamic verbs?

In Merriam–Webster, the definition of understand is as follows: to get the meaning of something / to grasp the meaning of something. Now my questions are regarding a sentence like: I don’t ...
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1answer
749 views

Can one be “looking” surprised? [duplicate]

I was recently proofreading an ESL textbook and came across a photo of a woman. She had a surprised look on her face. Underneath were four options that the student was to pick. One of them was: "...
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4answers
14k views

“Ing form of see (Seeing)” [closed]

Seeing the light despite the darkness I got this "headline" from the Guardian newspaper. But as far as I know, it's not possible to use "see+gerund" when see does not mean visit. Then, why did the ...
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2answers
10k views

History of the phrase “I was like..” or “I was all…”

When telling a story, it's near essential at some point to state what you said or felt. The younger generation uses phrases "I was like...", OR the similar "I was all...", to express a past state or ...
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2answers
422 views

I have a bodyguard in order to protect myself

I have a bodyguard in order to protect myself. I was told that I cannot have a stative verb in the required condition: I have a bodyguard But I don't understand how "I need to study in order to ...
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2answers
1k views

Prepositions in stative verbs in passive structures

I wonder how it can be possible for a 'stative verb', that is not intransitive, to be used in a 'passive structure'. I know there are a lot of passive sentences containing stative verbs. The ...
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4answers
2k views

In “Why do you think this is?” is the verb “to be” a linking verb or a stative verb?

In this clip, you can hear the following question: Recent polls have shown a fifth of Americans can’t locate the US on a world map. Why do you think this is? It’s not clear to me if the clause “...
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2answers
1k views

Usage of stative verb “expect”

I am wondering if the verb expect is used as a stative verb in the following sentence: I entered the classroom and [to expect] to see some students but instead I found a note which said [...] ...
3
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1answer
292 views

Stative verbs, “to be in labour”

I was wondering if in the construction to be in labour, the verb be is stative, and for this reason we can't use it in the progressive aspect. Or, is this next construction grammatically correct: she ...
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1answer
5k views

Verbs not normally used in the present continuous

I found the information below in a grammar book: The following verbs are not normally used in the present continuous : like, love, hate, want, need, prefer, know, realize, suppose, mean, ...
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5answers
3k views

What is a verb that means “is possible”?

These phrases have the same meaning: an existing X / X is existing / X exists As do these: a possible X / X is possible / X [sought word] Is there a verb that corresponds to 'exists', but has ...
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2answers
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Is “to wear” also used as a “dynamic verb” meaning “to don”, “to put on”?

My intuition was that the verb to wear could be used in two ways (besides all its other senses that is.) A "stative" sense related to the state of having clothes (etc) on. A "dynamic" sense related ...
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1answer
194 views

Is “dress” in this sense a stative verb?

When one uses "dress" to show the particular way that one dresses, is dress a stative verb? For example, "She dresses well" or "He dresses extravagantly."
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2answers
254 views

Is “made” in this sense stative or dynamic?

"Several subsequent voyages were made." Is the verb "made" here stative or dynamic?
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3answers
26k views

What is the difference between saying “I wasn't knowing” and “I didn't know”? [closed]

I was wondering what is the difference between I wasn't knowing and I didn't know? If I say, I wasn't knowing, I am talking about something unknown in past, the act of not knowing is finished, it ...
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1answer
705 views

Stative and Dynamic Verbs

Please explain how a stative verb and a dynamic verb can have the same subject without breaking parallel construction. How correct and reasonable is this: I travel around the world and enjoy flying,...
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3answers
4k views

Is “have” as in “I have to go” a stative verb or a dynamic verb?

You generally have two types of "have": (1) He has two sons. (stative) (2) He has lunch alone. (dynamic) A stative "have" can be followed by "got", whereas a dynamic "have" cannot: (1a) He ...
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1answer
307 views

I see and I hear

Traditional English prescriptive grammar teaches that these two verbs, to see and to hear, when describing their sensory nature, should never be used in the progressive aspect of tenses. Thus I am ...
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8answers
53k views

“Wanting” or “want”?

Lately I have noticed that a lot of people use "wanting" in sentences, or in books, but I don't get it because my English teachers have always said to me that with verbs like "love", "like", "want" ...
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1answer
610 views

Interpretation of 'have' as stative or dynamic

Please bear with me. It's been a long time since I looked up grammatical concepts. The sentence is: I can quite clearly see the bewildered looks you will be having on your faces on reading this. ...
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3answers
56k views

“How long have you [had/been having] this?” - Cont. or Simple?

I'm studying Present Perfect tenses at the moment and have been wondering what tense should I use in this example: How long have you [had/been having] this thing? So I know that in some cases (...
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4answers
3k views

Is this usage of “inside” correct?

This text is taken from a children's reader. It's about some children who find a doll house that is an exact reproduction of their home. Biff opened the little house. Everyone looked inside. "It ...
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1answer
4k views

Is “he plays the piano” stative or dynamic?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stative_verbs: The same verb may act as stative or dynamic. An English phrase like "he plays the piano" may be either stative or dynamic, according to context. ...
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3answers
30k views

What's the difference between “I want” and “I am wanting”?

What is the difference between the two? Why and where is the latter very strange sounding variant used?