Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 174 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Questions about the use of whitespace characters

0
votes
1answer
20 views

Parentheses within abbreviations

The example that I have is from South Africa. Chartered accountants here abbreviate their titles in emails to: CA(SA) This is meant to abbreviate "Chartered Accountant (South Africa)". I feel, ...
0
votes
1answer
73 views

What is the rule for spacing between words and the character &? [duplicate]

What is the rule for spacing between words and the character &? For example, do I have to space Espresso&Tonic - Espresso & Tonic, although I am talking about one drink made with an ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

When did 'some one' turn to 'someone'?

I was recently reading a book from sometime in the first half of the 20th century and I noticed that the word ‘someone’ was spelled separately as ‘some one’. Was there an official change at some ...
-1
votes
1answer
47 views

Does the word “foot” refers to something else different of a part of a body [closed]

I'm reading about astronomy and all that stuff and I found this phrase pretty interesting, is from the book "Is life out there" by Sara Seager and she makes an analogy with the impossibility of ...
0
votes
2answers
80 views

Trade marks or trademarks?

What is the correct format to use when referring to trademarks in British English? Is "trademarks" generally preferable? I've seen both used in different contexts, the UK GOV page uses "trade marks", ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

(un)conditional or (un-)conditional?

I want to write "conditional (mean imputation)" and "unconditional (mean imputation)" shorter, which of these 4 is the best way to do that? If multiple ways are correct, which is the most common (in ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

Are there spaces in the expression of dimensions? [duplicate]

I read on this website that there should always be a space between number and unit, except units like degree, minute(') and second(“). What about when they are in the form like this: 400 mm * 200 mm *...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

“Filepath” or “file path”? [closed]

A path, the general form of the name of a file or directory, specifies a unique location in a file system. "Filename" is a compound, but how about "filepath"/"file path"? "Filepath" seems incorrect ...
0
votes
2answers
961 views

Can we use the wording “We can not only … but also …”?

Is the following wording okay? He can not only do this, but also do that. In this case, it seems that the writer is dividing 'cannot' into two words. Is that acceptable?
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Everyday vs every day [duplicate]

I saw a quote from the movie The Notebook that I thought was nice, but I'm not sure if it's grammatically correct. "No matter what happens to us, everyday spent with you is the best day of my life." ...
0
votes
1answer
220 views

“Webpages” or “Web Pages”?

Sometimes I found it written as "WebPages" and sometimes it is "Web Pages" .. I'm confused should it be written as one word or two words ?!
1
vote
1answer
184 views

Why is the noun “blacklist” (written without a space) in the dictionary, but not “whitelist”? [closed]

Checking Oxford Dictionaries Online, I find the noun blacklist, written as one word, and the noun white list, written as two. There is no black list defined as a compound written open, and there is no ...
4
votes
1answer
321 views

Shoud spaces be used between “<” or “>” and numbers or letters?

Should spaces be used between "<" or ">" and numbers or letters? For symbols, what is right? P<10, P <10, P < 10 or P< 10? For numbers, what is right? 4>2, 4> 2, 4 > 2 or 4 >2? Is ...
0
votes
1answer
79 views

In a statistical model context, “overfitting” or “over fitting”? [closed]

I have been writing a research proposal. In a particular part of the proposal, I talk about statistical methods that will be used to avoid "overfitting." This is a statistical concept describing a ...
1
vote
1answer
20k views

“high school”, “highschool”, or “high-school” [closed]

In English usage, should one use high-school, high school, or highschool? (Assume American English; I understand that the Brits call it secondary school.)
0
votes
1answer
526 views

Using a space between name initials [duplicate]

Does one need to put a space between initials of the first and the second names. Which one is correct: "Sincerely, J. D." (where J. D. means John Doe) or "Sincerely, J.D."?
0
votes
1answer
544 views

Correct spelling for the abbreviation “FPS” (frames per second) [duplicate]

Well-known game journalists TotalBiscuit and Jim Sterling use [the number of frames per second] fps instead of 30FPS or 30 FPS, without an intervening space between the units and the following units (...
0
votes
1answer
82 views

Is it ever correct to write “doorlight” as one word?

Would it be proper to write "doorlight" without a space? If so, how is it different from "door light" in terms of its definition and usage? I've mostly seen "doorlight" written to describe light ...
3
votes
5answers
497 views

Why is “a lot” written as two words even though “ahead” is written as one word?

So I know "alot" should be written "a lot" and I have seen this amusing post on the treatment: http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.co.nz/2010/04/alot-is-better-than-you-at-everything.html However, why ...
1
vote
0answers
171 views

What is the history of spacing before punctuation? [closed]

From time to time, particularly when reading older or foreign books, one notices that the author puts a space before certain punctuation marks. […] to join Nayler in preventing it_! (In Peril ...
2
votes
2answers
289 views

How is a misuse of punctuation spacing perceived by native British and American people?

I am a Frenchie and an English enthusiast. In my language, we use spaces before quotation marks, exclamation marks, and colons. While I'm aware that this is not the case in English, there are times ...
3
votes
1answer
38k views

“Once in a while” OR “Once in awhile”? [duplicate]

1. Once in a while OR 2. Once in awhile Which is the correct phrase? I'm thinking it's the first one, but I'm unable to find out for certain. "a while" vs "awhile" and ...
1
vote
1answer
71 views

What is the error called when spaces are placed incorrectly?

He went home , but he forgot his phone .He returned to get it . ^ ^ ^ These are some examples, which nowadays get autocorrected by word ...
0
votes
0answers
441 views

How to use three dots?

I would like to know how to use the punctuation mark in the following example: Did you know... (written as a big headline) (and the below text written underneath, on a separate row) ...that our store ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Chatroom or chat room? [closed]

According to Wikipedia: The term chat room, or chatroom, is primarily used to describe any form of synchronous conferencing, occasionally even asynchronous conferencing. Merriam-Webster lists chat ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

Blogpost vs. blog post [duplicate]

Have I written a blogpost or a blog post? I've seen both forms used but am not sure which is the "correct" one, if there's any.
0
votes
2answers
656 views

Is there any difference between “anyone” and “any one”?

When I read books in English, I see sometimes there is a space between "any" and "one" and sometimes there is not any space. So, what is the difference between "anyone" and "any one"?
4
votes
2answers
4k views

Should there be a space in e.g./i.e. between a dot?

Should there be a space (thin space) in e.g./i.e. between a dot? Taking in account that e.g. is shortening of exemplī grātiā, then one should use space between e.spaceg., is not it? I believe that ...
0
votes
0answers
47 views

Is there a space before an exclamation or question mark? [duplicate]

Good evening everyone, First of all, I am a french secondary school pupil so I am sorry for every mistakes (If you have enough time, could you say me for every mistakes I make ? Thank you) I was ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Punctuation & Spacing for abbreviations [duplicate]

What is the correct way to use the abbreviation for "Feet" (Ft) and should there a space between a number and the abbreviation?
16
votes
4answers
2k views

Why is “forward slash” not spelled “forwardslash”?

The phrase "forward slash" contains a space, while its equivalent "backslash" does not. This seems inconsistent; should "forwardslash" not be a valid word? From Wikipedia I discovered that slash, ...
3
votes
1answer
5k views

touchscreen, touch-screen, touch screen? Merriam-Webster and Oxford disagree

I have searched but cannot find a definite answer on the correct to write "touch screen". Merriam-Webster says touch screen. Oxford says touchscreen. And random people around the internet say "touch-...
2
votes
1answer
965 views

Should Kelvin symbol have a preceding space?

I'm working on a lighting product catalogue with products from many overseas suppliers. In regards to colour temperature, some of them put a space character before Kelvin symbol, some not: 4000K, ...
17
votes
1answer
197k views

What's the difference between “every time” and “everytime”? [closed]

What's the difference between everytime and every time? I'm a little confused about them, they both seem to have same meaning. Excluding their spelling, are there any other differences between them?
1
vote
0answers
2k views

Should there be a space before and after an ampersand when writing numerals?

How should one write "one and two" in short form - 1&2 or 1 & 2? Are there any particular rules regarding this? In context: You may choose to do Information Technology Units [1&2/1 &...
5
votes
3answers
18k views

“However” vs. “how ever”: one word or two?

I am writing a paper and stumbled upon this sentence of mine. "The output remained consistently poor however the data was/were analysed". "The output remained consistently poor how ever the ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

Do parentheses need spaces either side?

I should place parentheses after a space or without any spacing? Which one of below sentences is right? We adopted DM (Data Mining) in this lecture. We adopted DM(Data Mining) in this lecture.
1
vote
2answers
1k views

spacing between units in a scientific paper [closed]

Which one is the correct way of writing: The sugar concentration was 20 g/mL or The sugar concentration was 20 g/ mL
0
votes
1answer
696 views

“Stockmarkets” vs. “stock markets”

I am having trouble with the difference between stockmarkets and stock markets — or should it be stock-markets? In some articles it is introduced as stockmarkets, but that term is not found in ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

“Web design” vs. “webdesign”

Suppose I want to use the word in a company's name, for example: ABC Web Design ABC Webdesign Which one is correct? Should it be one word or two?
0
votes
0answers
42 views

Why add extra space between a word and punctuation (e.g. a period, question mark, etc.)? [duplicate]

I was just wondering this because of noticing a lot of people I've worked with typed this way. Examples: Okay, that's great . Thanks, Stephanie . Was there anything else ? I was wondering if ...
10
votes
4answers
39k views

“onto” versus “on to”

Should the single word onto or the two words on to be used here? She held onto the cushion instead of holding onto the metal frame. She was grabbing onto the seat cushion. There's nothing ...
1
vote
2answers
462 views

Space before computer storage abbreviations [closed]

Forgive me if this has already been asked, I could not find it via search. My question is this: what is the proper way to append computer storage abbreviations to a number? For example, a 500 ...
9
votes
2answers
47k views

Do I use timeslot or time slot or time-slot?

As in "the timeslot given to completing the task". Would also be interested to hear if there's different usages for different scenarios.
0
votes
1answer
566 views

Words to help describe when you are using spaces and line breaks in text?

If you look at the difference between something like quick brown fox and quickbrownfox, you might reasonably describe the first as being "spaced". While the second is, perhaps "unspaced" or "...
3
votes
3answers
5k views

Is “enroute” an acceptable variant of “en route”?

Is "enroute" (without the space) an acceptable variant of "en route"?
3
votes
0answers
94 views

Why is “birthday” one word as opposed to two? “Wedding day” or “graduation day” are two [duplicate]

A birthday is the day of your birth, much like graduation day and wedding day. Why is birthday one word?
4
votes
1answer
9k views

The difference between “anyway” and “any way”

When to use anyway and when to use any way? Anyway I can do it. Any way I can do it. Are these the same?
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Is subaccount one word?

I looked at the Cambridge and Oxford dictionaries online and they don't contain this word. But typing it into google takes me to the Merriam Webster definition. So does this just come down to taste? ...
3
votes
1answer
22k views

“Can not” vs. “cannot” [duplicate]

Is there a difference in meaning and/or connotation between "can not" and "cannot"? I have read and seen both used interchangeably, but I know people who argue for a slight difference in meaning. ...