Questions tagged [slang]

Questions about “Language of a highly colloquial type, considered as below the level of standard educated speech, and consisting either of new words or of current words employed in some special sense.” [OED: 𝒔𝒍𝒂𝒏𝒈]

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3
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1answer
416 views

I would like to know some Aussie slang terms for well… diarrhoea!

Only two terms in Strine I had come across for diarrhoea: one is 'A bad case of the trots'. Another is, 'To have an attack of the flying axe handles'. Really! Are these the only two terms in both ...
8
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7answers
2k views

What is the comparative of “I am broke”?

I am broke In slang it means to be without money, but how would I say (facetiously) that my economic situation is worse today? a. I am broker today b. I am more broke today Solution b) ...
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3answers
2k views

Is it very wrong to say “can you pass the salt?” expecting people to pass the salt?

It makes sense to just pass the salt when someone says, "can you pass the salt?", but how grammatically incorrect is that? Are we supposed to just answer yes for that question? This happens in ...
0
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1answer
73 views

Help in deconstructing a sentence [closed]

This was a question posed by a friend. I'm myself curious of the answer. I apologize for the explicit content (I left it as is to remove ambiguity). I pretty sure that 'a yuppy fu@k' is a compound ...
-1
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2answers
216 views

What do these words and sentences mean?

I'm translating an episode of a TV series called "Sons of Anarchy". In a scene (where business partners have a meeting): A: "Quinn showed us some Red Woody rough cuts. Business is good." B: ...
0
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0answers
20 views

The phrase “caught flat footed”…is that okay to use in professional lanuage? [duplicate]

We are redoing our company website and we are discussing interview tips. The phrase "caught flat-footed" came up and it sounds a bit derogatory to me. Is it okay to use in a professional situation? ...
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1answer
75 views

The phrase “caught flat footed” [closed]

Is it professionally okay to use the term "caught flat-footed"?
2
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3answers
73 views

Term for the mental state of a new recruit

Is there a word (probably slang), that describes the slight state of shock common to new recruits in the first days (weeks) of military training, or the recruit suffering from that mild state of shock?...
2
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1answer
388 views

Is “startlement” a word?

I have always thought that startlement is a word in the lexicon. But one day when I was writing in a google doc, I saw it underlined like a typo. I googled it to see if it was indeed a word, or a ...
0
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1answer
2k views

someone who can't admit mistakes or is always right? slang [duplicate]

A word for someone who refuses to admit to being wrong or mistaken about anything, even as minor as a typo?
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2answers
165 views

What does “have it bad” mean in this sentence?

While playing Skyrim, Redoran guards may say this to me "you think you have it bad? Try walking the bulwark at night". I take it that he means walking the bulwark at night is terrible even for a tough ...
0
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2answers
525 views

What is the difference in meaning between 'stoked' and 'psyched'?

I've heard both stoked and psyched used by native speakers quite a few times, and I thought they meant basically the same thing: 'excited'. Then, I came across this slang expression: styched ...
2
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0answers
141 views

“stap my vittles” [closed]

Does anyone know the expression "stap my vittles"? I take it to mean just "holy smokes" (etc.), but I can't remember where I ever encountered it, nor can I find an explanation of the expression or ...
2
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2answers
4k views

Idiom: Origin of the phrase “a bit how ya going” to mean questionable or 'not quite right'

In Australia, where I live, it is not uncommon for people to describe something as "a bit 'how ya goin''" to mean that it's a little bit dodgy, or not quite right. An example is "Hey don't you have ...
0
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2answers
581 views

Ain't and gotta [duplicate]

I have a sentence below: You ain't gotta believe me. In this sentence, If i'm not wrong, Does ain't mean have not? and Does gotta mean got to? So, it means You have not got to believe me. I'm I ...
6
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4answers
593 views

Adding the letter O onto the end of root words like - friendo, fatso, f*cko, weirdo, etc

I have seen these type of words both in movies and on the net. Now, I am trying to understand, what is the point in adding the letter O onto the end of root words? Does it act as a intensifier of the ...
0
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2answers
347 views

What is the meaning of the phrase, I'm partial to your abracadabra? [closed]

On Ian Dury's first album, there is a song titled, I'm partial to your Abracadabra. The song, as all of Durys' songs is filled with lots of London slang, most of which is recognisable. However, i ...
1
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1answer
682 views

Slang word for procrastination? [closed]

Is there a slang word for "the art of doing useless things all day long" in English? I've been asked this today, and I the only word I can think of is "procrastination" but that's not slang. Do you ...
14
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7answers
3k views

Dismissive term for college diploma

In Portuguese, a college diploma is colloquially referred to as a “canudo”, literally a “tube”. This usage is typically semi-dismissive, for example if you want to imply a diploma — the actual piece ...
14
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2answers
25k views

SNL's Black Jeopardy: What does “fid'na” mean?

In perhaps one of the funniest SNL's Black Jeopardy! sketches ever, the expression Fid’na was one of the six categories along with; Grown Ass, Aw Hell Naw, Girl Bye, I Ain’t Got It, and White People ...
2
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1answer
127 views

Did word “beavis” mean anything before Beavis&Butthead series were aired?

In other words,why Mike Judge named one of characters "Beavis"? Was there also some slang meaning or word play behind it as in "Butthead"?
4
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3answers
2k views

When was “fo' sho'” first used in print, television, or music? Or, better yet, when was it standard southern slang?

I can only seem to find Urban Dictionary, et al. references, so I'm turning here for an answer. I know that "fo" ("for") and "sho" ("sure") are common southern dialect replacements, but a debate ...
3
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1answer
95 views

Usage of the noun “aesthetic” to refer to a set of artistic principles and motifs

Is it non-standard to use the term "aesthetic" to refer to a set of artistic principles and motifs that define a particular artist or artistic movement? From Wiktionary's entry for aesthetic: 3. (...
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1answer
54 views

Single word for “performed catastrophically badly” (in a computing context/sense)

I know I've heard this word but cannot place it. Help please? I'm looking for the slang-like/tech jargon term one might read in a computer software developers' discussion or email exchange, if ...
22
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10answers
9k views

In my native language, we have this obscene saying - don't take a dump in the barrel of honey

The implication is that one must not display a disrespectful behavior in regards to his/her friends or the people he/she knows very well, because as the honey in the barrel won't be edible anymore ...
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1answer
386 views

“'Sup” and “whack” in 2000 as teen slang

In "Friends", season 7 episode 1 (2000), Joey, who is 31, wants to look and behave like a nineteen-year-old for his audition and uses "'sup" and "whack" in dialog with Chandler (from IMDb): [Joey ...
4
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2answers
224 views

What is the UK equivalent of 'murica and 'straya?

There is a pejorative phrase in the United States for country hicks that has recently arisen: 'murica Implying that that user of the phrase doesn't pronounce their words properly and doesn't ...
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2answers
99 views

Word / idiom meaning things you had to have seen live

In the viewing party episode of The Office (US), office worker Jim describes some special events which are broadcast live on television as: Some events are so news worthy, so historic, that you ...
5
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3answers
1k views

A single word for overreaching / overestimating ones own abilities?

Is there a single word slang or otherwise that can describe A person who continually overreaches or overestimates their own abilities. and example usage "Bob's such a word: He always injures ...
3
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3answers
3k views

What's the origin of the phrase “cruising for bruising”?

It means "Acting in a way that is likely to cause trouble" but what is the origin of this expression which is not present in Etymonline?
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0answers
76 views

What does “shareholder” mean in the Guy Ritchie's movie “Revolver”?

I sure it doesn't mean "an owner of shares in a company". In translated movie in my native language this word was missed, and I don't understand what does in mean in this situation. One character asks ...
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1answer
755 views

Can “Yo” be used to end a conversation?

I understand "yo" is meant to be used as hello or for emphasizing something. But lets say in a situation where I am texting with someone and at the end of that conversation using "yo" instead of "ok" ...
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2answers
528 views

Should I use contracted forms in scientific presentations?

In a scientific paper am I right in believing that one would write “it is” instead of “it’s”? In a scientific presentation, would one use contracted forms like “it’s” instead of “it is” or is ...
5
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3answers
355 views

Was “matchmaking” the equivalent of today's “shipping”?

Oh my goodness. I'm shipping Lupita and Trevor so much!!!! They are so beautiful together and irradiate such a good energy! Comment copied verbatim from YouTube. ‘Lupita’ is the Mexican-Kenyan actor, ...
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4answers
2k views

Someone who thinks he's very important, but isn't

I cannot find a good equivalent of the Russian "Watchman's syndrome" in English. It refers to someone who thinks he's very important, but isn't. For example, this guy has "Watchman's syndrome": This ...
3
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2answers
2k views

Why is it “to have sex” instead of “to sex?”

In English, there is no generally acceptable verb for someone to say the equivalent of "to sex." All our equivalents are either too vulgar ("to fuck", "to bang", "to smash") or too formal ("to ...
2
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1answer
161 views

What does “you dropped them keys” mean? [duplicate]

I was listening a song called To The Left from Beyonce. There is a part that she sings: “Because you was untrue Rolling her around in the car that I bought you Baby you dropped them keys Hurry up ...
0
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2answers
139 views

What does “roll a hobo” mean? [closed]

I heard this phrase in a TV show. Two characters are drinking in the scene, and one of them is not pleased with the low quality of the alcohol brought by the other person. The conversation goes like ...
2
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2answers
1k views

What does “up in the cyph” mean in hip-hop?

In the song "Dance With the Devil" by the rapper Immortal Technique, there is a line that I don't understand. So now he had a choice between going back to his life Or making money with made ...
18
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3answers
4k views

Is “gone” meaning “pregnant” a Britishism?

The slang usage of gone meaning pregnant is mainly a BrE one according to Cambridge Dictionary (mainly UK informal) pregnant: How far gone is she? (= How long has she been pregnant?) while ...
1
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1answer
392 views

Did the phrase “ball and chain” referring to one's wife originate in U.S. black culture?

Green's Dictionary of Slang has this to say about the phrase "ball and chain." (orig. US black) one’s wife or regular girlfriend; thus ball-and-chained, married. However, the earliest citations ...
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19answers
14k views

Non-vulgar alternative to “Don't care a ____” [closed]

I am writing a poem for school. The verse with the word I need to change is this: 7 hours is too long In much too short a day You really don’t care if you get an answer wrong Because you don’...
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10answers
13k views

Do native English speakers use the word 'notif' to mean ‘notification’ or ‘alert’?

This question is quite subjective as it probably depends on where you live. I was wondering whether the shortened version of notification — “notif.” — was used in spoken language. In French we tend to ...
1
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1answer
1k views

“Know jack” vs. “Don't know jack.” [duplicate]

When you want to say that someone doesn't know anything about a particular thing, do you say they don't know jack about it, or that they know jack about it? I've seen it used both ways. Which is ...
3
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2answers
6k views

When did the word “guys” become popular as a gender-neutral word?

It's normal nowadays to walk into a room (men and women, boys and girls etc) and go, "Hey guys!". Has this always been the case, or what?
4
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1answer
810 views

Does “51” meaning crack cocaine have any relation to police code “5150”?

According to this list of drug slang terms from a declassified DEA report, 51 is slang for crack cocaine. Checking Green's Dictionary of Slang confirms the term (listed as fifty-one) and lists the ...
1
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2answers
272 views

“Monsta” as “Monster” abbreviation?

Can "Monsta" be a correct slang word or abbreviation for "Monster"? Sounds good and cute to me but as a non-native speaker I don't understand if it's actually a word that natives may use (maybe kids?)...
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3answers
131 views

Formal way of saying “chickens out”

I am writing an essay, and I need to find a formal word that means the same thing as chickens out. The context in which I use it is "Eckels chickens out of hunting the dinosaur and he runs back to the ...
4
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2answers
116 views

Arcing up: cats or electricity?

In Australian English slang, the expression "to arc up" means "to become upset or angry" (Wikitionary), e.g. "he arced up at his boss after being denied a promised pay rise", or "it was just a joke, ...
2
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1answer
1k views

Idiom for being skilled

There's a recently-created idiom to assert that one has skills, and I don't remember what it is. It sounds like it was created by a Millennial. I want to say it has either a martial-art or science-...