Questions tagged [slang]

Questions about “Language of a highly colloquial type, considered as below the level of standard educated speech, and consisting either of new words or of current words employed in some special sense.” [OED: 𝒔𝒍𝒂𝒏𝒈]

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28
votes
6answers
139k views

Etymology of “Buff” and “Nerf” as used in video-game slang

In video games, when the makers increase the power of something, it is sometimes referred to as a buff. If they decrease the power of something, it is called a nerf or a de-buff. This also applies ...
4
votes
1answer
303 views

Looking for synonymous expressions for - to throw someone away like a used toothpick

In my native (Georgian) language we have this colloquial saying - throw someone away like an eaten apple, meaning- to get rid of someone after having taken advantage of him/her in a dishonest way. I ...
2
votes
8answers
59k views

Word for someone who does not like/want to get a job or do anything in life?

In Portuguese, my native language, we have a lot of words for this kind of person, like mandrião, calaceiro, calaça, indolente, malandro, etc. We have also lighter words like preguiçoso that is the ...
17
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4answers
88k views

What is the origin of the phrase “There goes the neighborhood” and does it have racial connotations?

I understood the meaning of the phrase to be relatively benign and mostly used facetiously. Can it be viewed as offensive in contemporary conversation?
13
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7answers
42k views

Origin of the of the phrase “feeling blue”

Where did the expression "feeling blue" come from?
11
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6answers
14k views

Meaning of “Hunky Dunky”

What is the meaning of the phrase hunky dunky? I heard this phrase in a conversation in an episode of The Big Bang Theory, an American sitcom. I haven't seen many usages of it. The sentence goes ...
18
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2answers
2k views

Where did “humongous” first appear?

William Hartson called the word “surely one of the ugliest words ever to slither its way into our dictionaries”, but regardless of what he would like to say about the word, I actually have always ...
117
votes
11answers
47k views

What is the difference between “tits” and “boobs”?

What is the difference between “tits” and “boobs”? P.S. I'm not sure if this question is appropriate but as English is not my native language I really would love to know the difference.
8
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7answers
5k views

Etymology of 'Pizzazz'

A question from December 2011 asked What is the social context of "pizzazz"?. I'm curious about the word's etymology. I checked some reference books, but they showed very little agreement ...
2
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5answers
2k views

The meaning of “scoots” as noun in Irish slang

In the second season, episode 4 of Derry Girls, in the last two minutes, the girls are caught trying to get rid of 'happy' scones, flushing them through the toilet, which gets clogged. In the next ...
4
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2answers
3k views

Rather unusual usage of the word “churn”

I came across this sentence in a book: "One especially strategic family room, where all these dark socio-cultural and political dimensions are dramatized brilliantly, is the kitchen, where the ...
0
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1answer
25 views

Word for trying to isolate an opponent player in association football

In association football (soccer), when one or more players are assigned the task of isolating an opponent player by trying to prevent him from getting the ball or by even circling him if they are more ...
2
votes
2answers
54 views

Word for kicking the ball far away from opponent's goal in Association Football

When a player is trying to score in Association Football (Soccer in American English) and kicks the ball with too much power and with misdirection, so that it completely misses the goal (typically by ...
0
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3answers
2k views

Where exactly did the slang phrase “digging it” come from

I'm a young native english speaker raised in Canada. At school me and most of my friends tend to use the phrase "Im really digging this", as to mean i'm really enjoying a specific thing or activity. ...
6
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4answers
7k views

Are there any current examples of English “Back-Slang”?

Other languages feature words pronounced as their inverse (such as verlan and fika). What are some examples of this in English? The closest example I can think of it Pig Latin.
1
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2answers
5k views

number one and number two as euphemisms for urinate/defecate. rationale for which is which?

After years of never knowing which is which, I finally looked it up and it seems number one is firmly taking a pee, while number two is taking a poo. This seems quite arbitrary so I am wondering the ...
1
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6answers
4k views

I'm looking for a slang word or idiom for someone who insists on intruding their presence on two others who would rather be alone

This person usually pretends not to see that they are unwelcome at the moment, but it may be that they just don't notice it. Depending on the circumstances, one of the two persons (typically lovers) ...
15
votes
16answers
45k views

Origin of “the wrong end of the stick”

If someone has the wrong end of the stick it means they've misunderstood something. If they've got the shitty end of the stick it means they've got a bad deal in some bargain or share-out. This doesn'...
15
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3answers
5k views

What does “OMG ponies!” mean?

What does this mean and what is the origin of this phrase?
23
votes
5answers
325k views

Where did the phrase “batsh*t crazy” come from?

I am curious how this term came to be. I've found this question on various forums, but none of them seem to agree where the term came from. The most popular explanation seems to come from "bat in the ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

How does this deliberate use of grammar mistakes add to one's delivery? [closed]

I've come across this expression used by native English speakers multiple times and excuse me for my reference to the language 'He don't give a sh*t.' Some of them are actually or at least set as ...
3
votes
1answer
79 views

What would D.O.R.A. have meant in 1929?

I recently started reading a strange little book from 1929 called Breaking Priscian's Head, or English as She Will Be Spoke And Wrote, by a Scotsman named J. Y. T Greig. In a passage about how some ...
14
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2answers
3k views

What does “a shnip” mean?

It is the word used in a play. The paragraph in which it is stated is the following: Why does everybody sabotage me, Frank? I give work, I pay well, yes ? They eat what they want, don't they ? I don'...
0
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1answer
47 views

Recent derogatory usage of the term ‘inkblot’?

I have observed the use of the term ‘inkblot’ in online forums for criticizing writing which is deficient in coherent logic and/or elucidation, e.g. “your incoherent inkblots notwithstanding.” In this ...
3
votes
1answer
83 views

“Everything's coming up X”?

I've heard several Americans say "everything's coming up X". Sometimes, it's a person's name, and sometimes, it can be anything. Example: https://youtu.be/ivW7z3wGAl8?t=175 Everything was ...
0
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1answer
29 views

What is the tense/modality of these two sentences? [duplicate]

He be like “I know a spot” and then drag you through miles and miles of forest to show you a tiny meadow. From Reddit Tora be getting impatient. * wink* From top comments on Webtoon I know this is ...
5
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3answers
2k views

When and where did “bad boy” start being used to mean something impressive, e.g. “Let's take this bad boy out for a spin!”

The term "bad boy" literally means a boy who is bad. Those of us who were boys and grew up speaking English are likely to have heard it applied to us, either as a description or a warning. Somewhere ...
0
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0answers
88 views

Slang: “To have a twenty on me”

So I was listening to a song (bülow - Own me), and there's this one line that I can't really understand. Which is "Got nothing but a twenty on me", and I can't really understand what it's ...
3
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4answers
10k views

What is the origin of the slang term “get out of here” to mean “you're kidding”?

What is the origin (first recorded use) of the slang term "get out of here" to mean "you're kidding" rather than "go away" ?
0
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2answers
66 views

How bad is the word, “bitch”? [closed]

I saw a movie, and a character called her mom "a raging bitch" while writing an email. How bad is the swear word "bitch"? Is it even okay to call your mom "bitch"..?
12
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3answers
13k views

Who invented “dooblidoo”?

The word dooblidoo is used by several different youtube channels as a different word for the youtube description bar. I've seen it used by the vlogbrothers and by PBS Idea Cahnnel. Who was first to ...
3
votes
1answer
76 views

What does “Go back on the loaf” mean?

There is a video game titled “The Suffering”. This game stars a character named Torque, who has been sent to Abbott State Penitentiary on Carnate Island off the coast of Maryland. Torque has been put ...
0
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2answers
63 views

What does the phrase “I don’t do X” mean? [closed]

I have come across versions of this phrase a few times, and I have to say that I’m stumped. Please allow me to cite the following examples. In the show “The Simpsons”, there is an episode titled “...
9
votes
3answers
11k views

Is “premises” always plural?

On-premises ... On-premise I see these terms frequently used to describe software systems hosted within a company's datacenter vs. software systems hosted externally by a third party (in the "cloud")....
-1
votes
2answers
106 views

What does this mean: “Bruh you folded like a house of cards.” [closed]

I got this reply using Youtube. I think 'Bruh' means 'Bro', and 'you folded like a house of cards' means like 'you crashed them'. Is this right? Thanks
5
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2answers
393 views

What’s the origin/etymology of “mm-bye”?

As said to end conversations (especially on the phone): mmm-bye. When and how did this form/usage start?
4
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4answers
8k views

Etymology of “thirsty” as slang for horny, covetous, desirous

I've been seeing this a lot more recently (mostly in YouTube comments). What is its etymology? Is this a recent invention? Example: YouTube video with 2M views: 17 Thirsty Athletes Caught Staring at ...
5
votes
4answers
1k views

Use of the word “freak” as a slang term to mean stoner or heavy marijuana user

In the late 1970s and early 1980s, the word "freak" was used for heavy marijuana smokers (other drugs might be involved as well) in New England boarding schools and as far south as Pennsylvania. My ...
2
votes
1answer
68 views

Is “fleabag” as a derogatory term for an unpleasantly dirty person a Britishism?

I have always heard and used "fleabag" as referring to a shabby hotel/motel room, a dump of a place, so I was kind of surprised to see it also has a separate meaning of a dirty person. This ...
0
votes
1answer
110 views

Abuse as correct, frequent use

In the context of videogames, mostly competitive, PvP videogames, it is at least somewhat common slang to say that using an ability correctly and effectively or frequently is abusing the ability. ...
5
votes
3answers
289 views

How and when did “jug” come to be a slang term for “prison”?

Most of the online dictionaries give this kind of alternate meaning of jug: Slang. jail; prison. When I was in grammar school it's what we called detention: "If you talk back to the teacher, ...
3
votes
1answer
546 views

What does this Gil Scott-Heron line mean: “God's hole card has been thoroughly piqued.”

The line is from "Comment #1." I know that a "hole card" is a card in poker (and apparently also blackjack) that is dealt face-down. But I'm unclear on what it means for that card ...
5
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12answers
4k views

A possibly modern derogatory term for housewife

I need a derogatory term for housewife. I couldn't find any in online dictionaries and I'm not sure I have ever heard of any in any language I'm familiar with. But I'm thinking there must be something ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

in the Chinese bubble

Lily is an international student who is studying in LA. But, she doesn't want to be one who is always in the Chinese bubble. Do English native speakers use 'bubble' to describe "a group of ...
2
votes
1answer
75 views

Could the origin of “gangway” as an interjection be from Cantonese?

The use of "Gangway!" to tell people to get out of the way seems to be relatively recent (e.g. 100 years) in use. There is a common equivalent expression in Cantonese, pronounced something ...
3
votes
0answers
61 views

Is the “Secret Policeman's Ball” an allusion to bribery?

The Secret Policeman's Ball were a series of benefit shows. However, is the phrase "buying a ticket to the Secret Policeman's Ball" an allusion to paying a bribe?
5
votes
2answers
333 views

What is the UK equivalent of 'murica and 'straya?

There is a pejorative phrase in the United States for country hicks that has recently arisen: 'murica Implying that that user of the phrase doesn't pronounce their words properly and doesn't ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

What does an 'ice run' means in Heathers?

There is this scene in Heathers (1988), where Veronica and JD sit in her car discussing a murder they commited the night before. Veronica is upset by being fooled, but Jason reassures her it was all ...
0
votes
0answers
169 views

Can you use “I digress” after you rant, even if it is an excess rant of the original topic?

Can you use "I digress" after you rant, even if it is an excess rant of the original topic? Example: Person 1: I got banned from league of legends Person 2: ok Person 1: Evan you're really ...
4
votes
1answer
196 views

Origin of “upmod”

What is the origin of the term "upmod" that is used by some people as a synonym of "upvote"? ("Downmod" also exists for the opposite action.) I found a Reddit thread that raises the question but doesn'...

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