Questions tagged [slang]

Questions about “Language of a highly colloquial type, considered as below the level of standard educated speech, and consisting either of new words or of current words employed in some special sense.” [OED: 𝒔𝒍𝒂𝒏𝒈]

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9
votes
5answers
14k views

“22 Acacia Avenue” British idiom

What is the meaning of this British idiom? I was watching BBC's Top Gear and the presenters were cracking jokes about people who live in the 22 of the avenues. And that the people who live there like ...
1
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1answer
40 views

Does 'throwback' require an indefinite article?

Should it be ‘a cheeky little throwback’ or just ‘cheeky little throwback’ Any help would be appreciated
1
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1answer
61 views

Has there ever been slang-dense phrasing?

In today's culture, mainly with the rise in Gen Z kids getting online, slang in English seems to have become more fluid. In a YouTube video from JackSepticEye, while he was reading sentences that ...
0
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3answers
10k views

Full of (piss|pith) and vinegar

Re: the expression: "Full of (piss|pith) and vinegar" Are both correct/acceptable? Is one preferred?
45
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3answers
11k views

Adding “dot com” to the end of a sentence?

Overheard this one while I was getting my hair cut. The two ladies were arguing about whether or not a given shampoo was appropriate for a customer that had just left. Something about the customer's ...
0
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1answer
55 views

Is “How's it going” a slang saying

My friend asked me how's it going and I asked how's what going as I expected the friends meaning was that of knowing what I was currently doing but my friend doesn't know currently the things which I'...
2
votes
1answer
90 views

Synonym for “turd” [closed]

Is there a countable noun with the exact same meaning as "turd" - a single, formed piece of faecal matter? Giving the reason for this enquiry might illustrate why 'stool' doesn't really work IMO. (1) ...
1
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2answers
109 views

Etymology of adding articles to insulting or negative adjectives

I recently saw Deadpool (great movie), and noticed that Negasonic Teenage Warhead responded to something Deadpool said with "That a stupid." But a few months before that movie was released, I heard ...
2
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3answers
130 views

Sarcastic way to say something is unexpected

My friend's husband once bought her breakfast and she was surprised since he rarely did that. She wanted to say something like "that was unexpected" but in a more joking and sarcastic tone. We thought ...
2
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2answers
8k views

What does NOOT mean?

I was listening to Vertigo NCS release, on YouTube and every comment underneath was like "IT'S HIGH NOOT NOOT." 98%-ITS HIGH NOOT NOOT 2%- Random Comments It's high NOOT NOOT!!!!!!! ...
-1
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1answer
55 views

Can “pip” mean picture or icon in British English?

I am playing a British game and I'm having trouble exactly understanding some of the words used in the dialogs! from "godus" game They seem to use the word "pip" to mean "graphic" or "icon", but I ...
2
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1answer
13 views

What slang words are used in social networks with the meaning of “cool”? [closed]

What English slang can be used in social networks to say that something is great and you like it?
6
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1answer
14k views

“Baby needs a new pair of shoes!”

I'm looking for the origin of this phrase: "Baby needs a new pair of shoes!" (Or "Mama needs a new pair of shoes" or "Daddy needs a new pair of shoes"). You see it in movies and television as a ...
0
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1answer
96 views

What does “That stick through they man through the BS with” mean?

I'm concerned with the second line of the first verse of "By a Stranger" by Black Rob: We came to give love to our die hearted real bitches That stick through they man through the bullshit with ...
3
votes
1answer
81 views

Did slang “hang” meaning “turn” as in “hang a left” relate at all to boxing slang?

Green's Dictionary of Slang gives this definition of "hang," referring to turning left or right in a car, with a citation from 1966. (orig. US) to turn a corner in a motorcar; as in hang a left, ...
0
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0answers
70 views

what kind of euphemism is this “work done” about? (in a context of online dating)

This is the latest of several online dating profiles I've seen posted, by women, about "work done". He has done his own work and respects that I've done mine. Similarly, I've also seen he's had ...
4
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11answers
51k views

What's a word to describe people who blindly follow their government without question?

I want to describe someone who fanatically follows one of the following: Governmental body Political party Country Basically, someone who will agree with their government/party/country regardless of ...
-1
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0answers
62 views

Any modern references to “hand job” in original context?

Thank you for reading this. I am organizing a fine arts and crafts event. I am calling it "Hand Job." I am fully aware of the slang version of this phrase, which is sexual, but I actually embrace the ...
21
votes
5answers
17k views

“I'm on the brew”

A conversation between two Scots: — What do you do for a living? — I'm on the brew. Assuming that I have the phrase right, what exactly does "on the brew" mean here? Based on the context, I ...
1
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4answers
11k views

What do you call a person who has a relationship with a much younger adult?

What do I call someone who marries or has a sexual relationship with someone much younger than themselves? Their partner is someone who is at least 18 years old. The term paedophile is not the ...
14
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1answer
293 views

Derivation of a slang greeting in Yorkshire: “Aye up serry”

When I was young, in the West Riding of Yorkshire 1942 to 1960 you would greet an acquaintance thus: "Aye up serry". I believe older residents of the village of Kiveton Park still use the phrase, or ...
0
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2answers
69 views

Looking for a word for an “outhouse” inside the house

I need a word for a restroom that does not have running water - where there is a pit toilet or a composting toilet instead of a flush toilet. If it were detached from a house, I am sure it would be ...
2
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5answers
16k views

What is the origin of a 'racket', meaning a scam or swindle?

According to the OED the term apparently began in Britain, but became equally used on both sides of the Atlantic. It means a dishonest or fraudulent line of business, a method of swindling for ...
1
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2answers
459 views

What is the expression/slang to describe that you suddenly decided to go [travel, change environment]?

For example you get tired of your job and saying: Oh,[expression, meaning to go] overseas/bar?
4
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4answers
1k views

“Oh for cute” - grammatical interpretation?

So I'm from Minnesota, and while most of our English is fine, we're known for a few -- shall we call them -- adaptations. One of these is the phrase "oh for <insert adjective here>". It's used as ...
1
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0answers
60 views

Is the following AmE usage of “chick” offensive?

GDoS shows the following AmE slang usage of chick (short for chicken) in different contexts: Chick: of interest to girls or women, e.g. chick movie, chick lit. 1993 [US] M. Myers et ...
3
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4answers
3k views

What are ditty-bop shades?

From Billy Joel's Keeping the Faith: I put on my shark skin jacket You know the kind with the velvet collar And ditty-bop shades What are ditty-bop shades? I can buy a pair, or could if they ...
4
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4answers
7k views

Word meaning “to startle someone by surreptitiously poking them in the sides, from behind”

I inadvertently caused a great deal of amusement among a group of friends by incorrectly using the word "goose" to describe the action of sneaking up behind a person and poking, tickling, or touching ...
0
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0answers
21 views

Narrowing Down a Phrase

In a story I am reading the narrator overhears snippets of someone else's conversation. In context, the sentence looks like this: Most of it was about story arcs and podcasts and montages and ...
13
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5answers
6k views

Did they say “hand job” in the 1800s?

Did they say "hand job" in the 1800s? I was watching an episode of Deadwood, and they just said it. For example, from episode 6 "Plague": (Al enters the back room, Dolly is scrunched up on the ...
16
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5answers
13k views

Come on, don’t be such a nimrod!

According to the OED, the word English Nimrod is derived from the Hebrew, where in Genesis 10:8–9 he is described as ‘a mighty one in the earth’ and ‘a mighty hunter before the Lord’. It is ...
3
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2answers
8k views

Origin of the word “yeet”

Dear fellow linguists, I have been researching the origins of the spurious word "yeet" Various studies have returned the root word "yeetus," however this does not provide any further clarification ...
10
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4answers
13k views

What is the origin of “breaking bad”?

Wiktionary gives the meaning of "break bad" but does not mention about the origin: 1. (colloquial, of an event or of one's fortunes) To go wrong; to go downhill. 2. (colloquial, chiefly ...
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1answer
611 views

Does “that's fair” indicate disagreement in a conversation?

If I argued with my friends and he texted me, "I got you. Yeah, that's fair." Does he mean he actually disagrees with me?
3
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4answers
194 views

Does this vulgar expression necessarily imply a certain body part?

My question is about the expression "suck on it." Background (you can skip this paragraph if you want): at Spanish SE we were doing some back-translating of a game we were playing in Spanish. When ...
2
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1answer
5k views

Why use 'I are' 'You is'?

I've seen many American and English people writing their sentences like this: I are... You is... While the way I've learned it, and seen most widely used is like this: I am You are Is this ...
1
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4answers
714 views

Why do people say the boyfriend instead of my boyfriend?

Why do people sometimes say the boyfriend instead of my boyfriend? Is it slang native to a particular part of the country?
-1
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1answer
228 views

Looking for a more obvious and more formal equivalent to a vulgar expression [closed]

What is the non-slang form of "shitting on someone", like to throw someone down?
14
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15answers
40k views

Origin of “the wrong end of the stick”

If someone has the wrong end of the stick it means they've misunderstood something. If they've got the shitty end of the stick it means they've got a bad deal in some bargain or share-out. This doesn'...
10
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8answers
18k views

Definition of “kissing cousins”— Are the dictionaries wrong/incomplete?

With relatives in the US south, I always thought that the definition of "kissing cousin" was a second cousin (or more distant) whom you could kiss and subsequently marry (FWIW I never did either!). ...
5
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2answers
118 views

Is “ho”/“hoe” basically an equivalent of “whore” which differs only stylistically?

On Russian SE we had a discussion about some Russian intentional misspelling one can encounter in Internet. As an example of such phenomena in English I've pointed to the following example: using "hoe"...
0
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4answers
117 views

What is the difference between “oof” and “oops”?

Can I interpret that "oops" is for when you yourself make a mistake and "oof" is for when someone else has a slip up? Do they share same origin? They seem awfully symmetric.
0
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5answers
6k views

“What went down”

I want to know the actual meaning of "what went down" is it the same as "What happened" if so, could someone make a sentence with "what went down" replacing "what happened? forgive the rendundancy
13
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3answers
489 views

Do “brownie points” derive from food-rationed “brown points”?

The OED has this to say about "brownie points." Brownie point n. [probably a development < brown-nose n. at brown adj. Special uses 2, but popularly associated with 2 and hence frequently ...
0
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2answers
83 views

Is this archaic usage or a mistake in the gutenberg version?

In the version of "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" available on gutenberg.org here, this appears: "she told him at last that if he didn't quit using around there" Is the use of the word "using" here ...
0
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1answer
26 views

untill its worth / not invain

I guys, I'm wondering to make a tattoo but I have been struggling a bit for the words to use; the first idea was "until it's worth" (abbreviated like 'till it's worth) but the meaning that I'm looking ...
2
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2answers
406 views

The meaning of “scoots” as noun in Irish slang

In the second season, episode 4 of Derry Girls, in the last two minutes, the girls are caught trying to get rid of 'happy' scones, flushing them through the toilet, which gets clogged. In the next ...
3
votes
2answers
306 views

Origin of “wannabe” and its precursors

The OED attests wannabe as slang in 1976 as a noun and 1986 as an adjective. A person who tries to emulate someone else, esp. a celebrity, in appearance and behaviour; a person who wants to belong ...
20
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7answers
200k views

Where did “I'm Jonesing” get its meaning from?

I'm Jonesing for a little Ganja, mon... I'm jonesing for a little soul food, brother... (verb) jonesed; jonesing; joneses to have a strong desire or craving for something (Merriam Webster) Where ...
3
votes
1answer
5k views

What is the origin of “breaking one's balls”?

While watching Goodfellas for the first time ever, I have stumbled upon the expression: "... and I am breaking your balls..." (for context: Clip from Goodfellas) Since I am Italian by birth, I ...