Questions tagged [sentence]

A sentence is a set of words that is complete in itself, typically containing a subject and predicate.

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24
votes
5answers
10k views

Is it really incorrect to start a sentence with "and"?

I know it's wrong, but I do it all the time or else my sentences would go on forever.
40
votes
3answers
22k views

How do you capitalize a proper noun such as "iPhone"?

I was always taught to capitalize the first letter of the first word in a sentence, and also the first letter of proper nouns. In the last few years it's been common for certain firms to name their ...
25
votes
17answers
173k views

Shortest comprehensive sentence in English [closed]

What is the shortest comprehensive sentence in English?
1
vote
3answers
2k views

Can this be considered a complete sentence?

Can this be considered a complete sentence? There lived a princess named Gretchen.
14
votes
6answers
187k views

Can you use two "and"s in a coordinate noun phrase?

For example, I like chocolate, vanilla, and lemon and orange ice cream. Indicating "lemon and orange" is a combined flavor, as an item in the list needing an initial and.
277
votes
16answers
56k views

How many spaces should come after a period/full stop?

In the past — or at least, when I was in elementary school — periods/full stops were followed by two spaces. Lately, it's become more and more common to see just one space. In the modern ...
1
vote
1answer
6k views

Capitalization of names that begin lowercased, at the beginning of a sentence [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: How Should Trademarks be Written? How do you capitalize a proper noun such as “iPhone”? Many products these days have names that intentionally begin with ...
6
votes
3answers
4k views

Shortest correct sentence in English- use of contractions [duplicate]

I often hear people saying that "I am" is the shortest sentence in the English language. I know that there are also discussions about sentences using the imperative mood such as "Go." that would be ...
12
votes
2answers
31k views

Initial capitalization of foreign surnames when starting a sentence

In the book, "The Crystal Shard," by R.A. Salvatore, a character is surnamed "de Bernezan." Which of the following complete sentences uses the correct English-language capitalization: de Bernezan ...
5
votes
9answers
16k views

Is a sentence always grammatically incorrect if it has no verb?

Is the following grammatically correct? My friend says the second sentence is grammatically incorrect, but couldn't explain why. I have always been fascinated by statistics. The different ways in ...
1
vote
1answer
282 views

To + verb in sentence without any other verb

From time to time I come across a sentence with to + verb, but with no other verb in it. I see it often in news titles. For example: Squall, Tina and Lightning to appear in Final Fantasy Explorers ...
33
votes
3answers
99k views

"Outside" or "outside of"?

The word rarely turns up outside that context. and The word rarely turns up outside of that context. Which one is correct and why?
31
votes
11answers
14k views

Can a sentence start with "Because"?

In my grade school days, I recall a teacher proclaiming to the class: You should never start a sentence with the word "Because". Of course, I've since seen lots of examples to the contrary, and ...
21
votes
7answers
3k views

Is there any valid rule discouraging the use of a certain word to start a sentence?

Is there any rule you think is valid that discourages the use of a certain word to start a sentence? Because I suspect the answer is no. But it would be good to have a blanket answer to this kind of ...
15
votes
1answer
14k views

How to deal with abbreviations at the end of a question?

In a sentence like Should we host them on imgur et cetera? where I want to abbreviate the "et cetera", what is the correct punctuation? Using a period after the "etc." like mid sentence usages ...
3
votes
2answers
24k views

What is the meaning of this sentence - "Were it not for the bodies there on the ground, it would have appeared to be a normal day at the oasis."? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Conditional sentences not starting with “if” What is the meaning of this sentence - "Were it not for the bodies there on the ground, it would have appeared to be a normal day ...
14
votes
2answers
31k views

Can you grammatically end a sentence with "with"?

Do you want to come with? Can I come with? I seem to hear this construction more often in recent years, but it still grates on my ear. I know it's often said that one shouldn't end a sentence with a ...
5
votes
2answers
4k views

Capitalising a sentence whose first word is explicitly lowercase [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Capitalization of names that begin lowercased, at the beginning of a sentence Let's say that you have a word that should be typed with leading lowercase letter. Perhaps it's a ...
19
votes
6answers
28k views

Is there an online sample sentence database or search engine?

Sometime, I am not sure if I use a specific word correctly. I would like to get some sample sentences to learn from. So, is there a online sample sentence database/search engine?
31
votes
12answers
54k views

"Nothing to tell" versus "nothing to say"

There's nothing to tell. There's nothing to say. Can anyone explain the difference between those two statements and give some examples on how they should be used? I think I do have a basic ...
10
votes
4answers
2k views

Why am I always compelled to begin a response with "Well, "?

Because of a certain 140 character limit I've learned where I can trim characters on responses but even after all this time I still reply with "Well, so and so . . ." and I go back and have to delete ...
14
votes
4answers
27k views

Can I start a sentence with "i.e."?

While writing a rhetorical question I ran into a case where it seemed natural to start a sentence with "I.e": How do we handle the case when the list is empty? I.e., if the filter matched no ...
7
votes
2answers
18k views

When using complete sentences in parenthetical e.g. or i.e. situations, should the first word be capitalized?

In a bulleted list of very technical sentences, where each bulleted item has one or two parenthetical examples or restatements which are complete sentences, should the first letter of each e.g. or i.e....
0
votes
2answers
4k views

"I left smoking", "I quit smoking", "I gave up smoking", "I stopped smoking" are these same?

For various such sentences in many cases I get confused, it seems different for different cases. I want to know if someone left doing something for permanantly then what should be used? Also give some ...
6
votes
5answers
57k views

Active to Passive voice: "Go to School Now"

How would you convert the imperative sentence: "Go to school now." to the passive voice? While discussing it in class, our teacher gave the following solution: "You are ordered to go to school now." ...
6
votes
2answers
3k views

"I give nothing to no-one" or "I do not give anything to anyone"

I have a bit of an issue with negations. Are the following correct? I do not give anything to anyone //I guess this is correct I give nothing to no-one //can I say that? Generally, is it the same ...
2
votes
4answers
664 views

Does standard English include non-trivial sentences which admit no verb?

One of the interesting aspects of the Maori language, as I understand it, is that it includes a class of sentences which not only have no verb, it is positively wrong to form them with a verb. Does ...
10
votes
3answers
80k views

When to use "most" or "the most"

I came across with this sentence and it cast me doubt the usage of "most" and "the most" The sentence states: "But what I remembered most is moving a lot" Would it change the meaning of the ...
16
votes
3answers
21k views

Starting an independent statement with "I mean, ..."

A friend was noting that his daughter would occasionally start sentences with the phrase "I mean, " simply for emphasis, not for clarification: Friend: How was the Miley Cyrus concert? ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Do "that" and "it" refer to different things in this sentence?

He likes going to the library to study. That always makes her happy. What if the last sentence were to be changed to It always makes her happy. Do these two sentences mean something different? ...
12
votes
3answers
7k views

The sentence with the most prepositions at its end -- does it really work?

What did you bring that book that I don't want to be read to from out of about 'Down Under' up for? I was wondering whether this sentence is actually correct and if it is, whether someone could ...
2
votes
0answers
1k views

Are there other repeated single word sentences like the Buffalo sentence? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Awkward sounding but grammatically correct sentences? My friend told me about the Buffalo sentence: Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo. It ...
4
votes
3answers
15k views

Are commands complete sentences?

This question seems to indirectly ask the question, but the upvoted answer says "the actual sentence is...". So my question is this: Are commands considered to be grammatically sound, ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Using plural and singular to refer to the same thing(s)

I often have trouble expressing myself when I want to talk about some things (plural) holistically as a single thing. For example, "differential equations are a form of expression...". It doesn't ...
0
votes
2answers
12k views

Meaning of "you don't need no memory" and its grammar or rhetoric [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “We don't need no education” You don't need no memory. Just don't know what it means.
0
votes
2answers
205 views

Comma after or before "parenthetic" and?

After showing me the house, Nana led us to the living room, and with Mongai's Take Me Somewhere Nice playing on in the background, we started on the Scotch we'd bought at the 7-Eleven. The dim light ...
122
votes
19answers
27k views

Is "women men girls love meet die" a valid sentence?

Is "women men girls love meet die" a valid sentence? If so, what does it mean? The sentence shows up in academic papers about the "Sausage Machine" for natural language processing. ...
36
votes
2answers
260k views

When to use "rather than" versus "instead of"?

I never really gave a deep thought at this but recently a teacher of talked about language and there was an implicit question in it. something like there is a difference between "rather than" and "...
9
votes
3answers
1k views

Ambiguity of "I don't know what you know."

This sentence is interesting to me: I don't know what you know. It seems ambiguous. It has two possible meanings. It is so ambiguous that I'm actually struggling a bit to explain the differences ...
6
votes
6answers
107k views

Forming valid one word sentences

I remember my English teacher saying that there are only two valid ways to make a one-word sentence: A question: Why? Where? A command: Go! Stop! Is this correct?
3
votes
4answers
15k views

'The average person' or 'an average person'?

Which one is correct, or are both of them fine? "It would take the average person 10 days to read this novel" Or "It would take an average person 10 days to read this novel"
9
votes
2answers
6k views

Is it okay to start a sentence with a Greek letter (variable)?

Is it okay to start a sentence with a variable? Do I need to rewrite a sentence just because the subject is typeset as a Greek letter? For example: Φ is treated in a special way. vs. The ...
3
votes
2answers
4k views

Answering questions with a negation at the end

How are you supposed to answer a question like this (assuming you're from Minnesota)? You are a Minnesotan, no? Are you supposed to give the same answer as your answer to this question or give the ...
1
vote
4answers
1k views

How can I rephrase compound sentences to make them simpler?

Following Martha's advise I am splitting up a question Compound sentences, the punctuation and mooore. Consider the following sentence: One of the items that needed a further development was a ...
0
votes
2answers
307 views

Is it common for native speakers to put a question mark at the end of declarative sentence?

Sometime, people put a question mark at the end of a sentence and use it to ask something. Instead using an interrogative sentence: Do you like it? You like it? I think it is more often to ...
0
votes
1answer
263 views

Is sentence patterns used everywhere?

I am studying English in Korea. All my friends and I are studying about 'sentence patterns' Sentence patterns, said in here, are S+V, S+V+C, S+V+O, S+V+I.O+D.O, S+V+O+O.C. But my teacher said ...
7
votes
4answers
3k views

Attributive and predicative position of an adjective

I have some difficulty understanding the position of adjectives. In English I have to put the adjective before the referred name (e.g., I'm an Italian man). In some languages (as Italian or Ancient ...
5
votes
1answer
2k views

"New York is a great place to live." (no preposition?)

New York is a great place to live. New York is a great place to live in. I've seen the former usage a lot and I've started wondering what the grammar aspects of it are. The main question I'm asking ...
4
votes
1answer
3k views

Use of "too" instead of "so" or "very"

I have a problem with using "too" in a sentence. In what situation would you use "too" instead of "so" or "very"? Please include an example to illustrate the difference.
4
votes
3answers
2k views

Is it a good idea to begin a sentence with a number or a variable name?

Is it acceptable to have the following sentences in formal writing? 2.5 years have already been completed. or n shows the number of something.