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Questions tagged [sense-verbs]

Questions about verbs related to the senses, or their effects.

7
votes
1answer
75 views

Discrepancy in using adjective or adverb with “taste”

One asks “how does x taste,” implying that they’d like an adverb describing the way it tastes. But one answers with an adjective, “it tastes good” instead of “it tastes well,” which would imply that x ...
-1
votes
1answer
58 views

How is “swimming” being used grammatically in “I saw them swimming in the lake”?

Consider this sentence: I saw them swimming in the lake. How is "swimming" used in the sentence? Is it a gerund or verb or anything else and how is it connected to the sentence? I am mostly aware ...
1
vote
0answers
23 views

Sense verbs (see and hear) used in the progressive form (specific contexts) [duplicate]

I have a question about sense verbs used in the progressive form, namely "hearing" and "seeing" in the contexts like the ones presented in the attached images (the underscored fragments). Is there any ...
2
votes
3answers
572 views

Is there a term for using color to describe taste or flavor, instead of using the actual flavor?

For example, if someone says "this tastes purple" instead of saying it tastes like grape, or if asked what flavor of Gatorade you prefer you answer with, "blue". It also seems common with candy and ...
1
vote
1answer
77 views

What tense is used for “go” in “you see it go away”? [duplicate]

I understand it's not the present tense, else it would be "goes". Is the sentence grammatically correct? If so, does it mean "you are seeing that it is going away"?
0
votes
1answer
2k views

When do I say “I have seen people do it” and not “I have seen people doing it”? [duplicate]

What is the difference between I have seen people do it and I have seen people doing it?
2
votes
4answers
479 views

Does “clack” necessarily refer to sound?

I have a question about the verb clack in the following paragraph taken from Sandkings by George R. R. Martin. In this paragraph, the protagonist, Simon Kress, is being shown a strange kind of ...
2
votes
1answer
751 views

Can one be “looking” surprised? [duplicate]

I was recently proofreading an ESL textbook and came across a photo of a woman. She had a surprised look on her face. Underneath were four options that the student was to pick. One of them was: "...
17
votes
7answers
24k views

“You hear but you don't listen” or “You listen but you don't hear”?

My teacher introduced the quote: You look but you don’t see. You hear but you don’t listen. But I also saw books saying: You look but you don’t see. You listen but you don’t hear. ...
0
votes
1answer
249 views

Verbs of senses in progressive tenses [closed]

How would a native speaker deal with this sentence I have seen him fight for his employees, I have seen him fight for his company, and now I am seeing him fight for our country. Is that childish?...
0
votes
3answers
12k views

What does this mean: “understanding you is like smelling the colour 9”?

I saw a quote that read as "understanding you is like smelling the colour 9" what does it mean? As it suggests it may mean finding something or someone hard to understand but why it's called ...
3
votes
1answer
680 views

Do fish smell or taste blood in water?

Which is the right verb to use? Is smelling as a verb strictly connected with air or what fish do is also called smelling? I ruled out "detect" as it sounds too formal, or is it?
1
vote
1answer
676 views

Can I say “listen for it” and “smell for it”?

I often hear the term to look for it: "I have studied symbolism in fine arts for years, and now I see symbolism in everything. I just can't stop myself after I learned how to look for it." Feel ...
18
votes
13answers
6k views

What's the Appropriate Word to Say You're 'Dazzled' by a Nice Smell?

Imagine there's food being cooked on stove and you feel the pleasant smell and it somehow makes you mad! You want to keep smelling or walk to the kitchen and get some of it to eat. What verb would ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Time and “look back on” as a phrasal verb

When using this tri-part phrasal verb, i.e., "look back on," what is the length of time it refers to or can refer to? For example, it's common to say: "When John looks back on his childhood, he can ...
0
votes
4answers
388 views

Is there a word like behold and hark but for any combination of sensory methods e.g. “be-sense”

I am looking for a word similar to behold and hark which applies to calling attention to or attending with senses to some phenomenon using any combination of sensory methods/channels (light, sound, ...
0
votes
3answers
3k views

“Can see” or “see”?

In the song "Me Neither" Brad Paisley sings: "...would you like to dance Me neither I was just bein' polite Thank goodness my feet are much too tired I'm sure you're tired too, I can see an empty ...
0
votes
1answer
744 views

Is usually tired, usually tired, and feels tired?

She is usually tired after coming back from school. She usually tired after coming back from school. She usually feels tired after coming back from school. Which one is correct? Also, are ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Is there a neutral word for an olfactory impression?

While creating this proposal I was struggling to find the right words for olfactory impressions. Is there a neutral word for an olfactory impression? smell seems to have a negative connotation ...
0
votes
1answer
8k views

“She always sees…” or “She is always seeing…”

She always sees things that don't exist. She is always seeing things that don't exist. In the first sentence we use verb "to see" in the present simple tense. In the second sentence, verb "to ...
4
votes
2answers
6k views

Intransitive verbs with preposition in passive sentences [duplicate]

The words listen, shout, etc. are intransitive verbs, but why are they used in passive sentences with preposition to, at, etc.? e.g: she was never listened to. I don’t like to be shouted at. ...
1
vote
3answers
5k views

What do you call it when you can't smell something? [closed]

The man who cannot see is blind. The man who cannot hear is deaf. The man who cannot talk is mute. What is the man who cannot smell?
1
vote
5answers
421 views

How can I describe a passive type of touching?

If I touch an item (like a book) intentionally, I might say I touch the book. Now, if this had happened without my being aware of it, I would not say that I touched it, but I also would not say ...
2
votes
5answers
23k views

A Word To Represent The 5 Senses

Working on a game and I need a single word that represents the 5 senses: smell, touch, taste, sound, and sight. At the moment I'm using "perception" which I don't think is adequate.
2
votes
1answer
21k views

“How it feels like” vs. “What it feels like”

I am not a native English speaker, and I'm always confused by people saying or writing "How it feels like" It doesn't sound right to me, and I am always trying to correct it to "What it feels ...
1
vote
4answers
599 views

Any differences between “The police observed the man entering the bank.” and “The police observed the man enter the bank. ”

Are there any differences between "The police observed the man enter the bank." and "The police observed the man entering the bank. " Does sentence one mean that the police observed the whole process ...
4
votes
2answers
17k views

What is wrong in saying “ I am feeling well right now”…?

The following sentences are frequently heard spoken by people if someone asks them about their well-being (especially when a doctor inquires about a patient's health!) : I am not feeling well and ...
0
votes
2answers
139 views

“Made look better” vs. “made to look better”

Results are made to look better by... Results are made look better by... Are both correct? Is there another way of phrasing this sentence?
0
votes
2answers
511 views

Initial “See, …” or “Look, …” usage

Which is correct to say 1. "Look , The situation was like that..." or "See, The situation was like that ....". 2. "Look , I am not involved in it..." or "See, I am not involved in it ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Can a book have a feeling?

I was drawn to the expression, “The book feels expressive” in the following sentence of the article titled “The Battle Hymn of the Tiger Family” in The New Yorker February 4 issue: “In any case, it ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

'See' and 'Hear' in the progressive?

I'd like you to go into details about the difference between 'see', 'hear' and 'seeing', 'hearing'. I'm not a native speaker, so it's a bit hard to understand this explanation that 'see' and 'hear' ...
2
votes
4answers
10k views

When someone says, “I do not feel that good”, what does that mean?

I have heard it many times in movies and shows. I think it means "I do not feel very good" or "I do not feel as good as you think", but why do we use "that" here, and is it correct?
11
votes
3answers
41k views

Is it really wrong to say “I'm hearing”?

Many grammar books claim that ‘see’, ‘hear’, ‘taste’, ‘smell’, ‘feel’ are verbs that aren’t used in continuous forms, and yet, we do hear and see it quite often used by native speakers. For instance, ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

Can you say “feel to” do something?

Is it correct to say, "I don't feel to trust him," particularly in British English? I'm actually a native speaker, but I live in Italy with my Italian wife, and so I've got so used to her (English ...
5
votes
1answer
87k views

Looking forward to “ see” or “seeing”?

Which of the 2 sentences is correct? Sam is looking forward to see the Rocky mountains. Sam is looking forward to seeing the Rocky mountains.
1
vote
2answers
6k views

How did the phrase “hear you out” or “hear me out” come about?

How did the phrase "hear you out" or "hear me out" come about? The phrase means "listen to whatever I have to say before you pass judgment on me," or "tell me whatever you want; I don't mind and won'...
0
votes
2answers
183 views

usage of see vs look

My fan is convenient to carry around. See it can be closed when not in use. OR look it can be closed when not in use. Which is correct?
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Why do these verbs take bare infinitives?

[a] It makes the tree grow. [b] I never heard him speak. I’m wondering why causative and sense verbs (make, hear) license bare infinitives for their complement, instead of taking to infinitives? What ...
2
votes
3answers
297 views

Beauty and beholder in respect to other senses

I've asked a question about olfactory's relation to observational and it got me thinking about other senses as well. There are five (or six if you're supernaturally believing), so, what are the exact ...
14
votes
8answers
13k views

What is a person who smells things called?

I was authoring a letter and made a joke about body odor. Regarding the visual sense: "... the beauty is in the eye of beholder..." Regarding the olfactional sense: "... the fragrance is in the ...
9
votes
9answers
530 views

“View”, but for hearing

I know a lot of words, but it's driving me crazy that I can't think of one for this. I'm sure there must be one. I want to be able to say: I had not only a great view of the ocean from that room, ...
2
votes
2answers
9k views

Is the phrase “I feel you” too colloquial?

Does the phrase "I feel you" sound too slangy and somewhat horrible to a British person? Is it ok to use it as a synonym of "I understand what you feel/say" in an informal, casual conversation?
5
votes
4answers
11k views

Is there a word for “look and feel”?

"Look and feel" is a term commonly used in UI, software and web design, yet we have job titles such as Web Designer, Visual Designer, Front-end Developer, UX Designer but no Look and Feel Designer. ...
1
vote
2answers
10k views

“feel tired” vs. “am tired”

Which of these two sentences is more appropriate in a given situation? I am tired. I am feeling tired. I know this might be a very childish question, but English is not my first language and ...
3
votes
1answer
592 views

What is the etymology of “look out”?

What does English idiom "look out" (or "watch out") come from? When you want to warn somebody. Usually, in case of a danger, it is better to hide rather than move your head out to see. (I know it is ...
1
vote
3answers
3k views

What is the difference between “He saw me talking” and “He saw me talk”?

Can anybody tell me the difference between the following two sentences: He saw me talking to her. He saw me talk to her. Please let me know if both the statements are valid and grammatically ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

orientational metaphor: I'm feeling “up” today

I have come across the following as examples of "orientational metaphors": happy is up; sad is down: I'm feeling up today. He's really low these days. While I understand the general concept, I ...
31
votes
3answers
31k views

“How does it look?”

Formally, in my English education, I have learned to ask for the outward appearance of something using the expression: "What does it look like?" Since my mother tongue is German and we say "Wie ...
2
votes
1answer
369 views

“Feeling well” adverb ambiguity

Am I just crazy, or is there some ambiguity in the phrase "feeling well"? Example: Billy has a genetic defect that causes him to lose sensation in his fingertips every few days, or so. "How are you ...
6
votes
1answer
4k views

Non-finite clause complementation of complex transitive verbs

This question has been bothering me for a while. It came up when I was reading Chapter 16 of "A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language." How to explain the grammatical structure of the ...