Questions tagged [sense-verbs]

Questions about verbs related to the senses, or their effects.

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Why would anybody use "bloody" to describe how would they take their burgers or any other food?

I think it doesn't make sense to go over to the bar and ask for a burger, and then when the bartender replies "How would you like your burger", to answer "bloody" (I saw this in a ...
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0 votes
0 answers
33 views

"I miss seeing her dancing" or "I miss seeing her dance"? [duplicate]

I'd like to know if it's correct to use ING + ING together in that sentence (i.e. seeing & dancing). I've seen people use both of these options, but I don't know if they are both correct.
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2 votes
1 answer
106 views

Catenative verbs without "to"

Here's a well-liked comment under a YouTube video, complimenting the creator: This man is an absolute joy to watch do literally anything. Although YouTube likes is not an indicator of grammatical ...
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6 votes
1 answer
149 views

'Voluntary/Involuntary' forms of verbs expressing the 5 senses

Is there any verb to express the 'voluntary/involuntary' aspect of the sensations of Taste, Smell and Touch as there is for Sight (to look/to see) and for Hearing (to listen/to hear)? Is there a ...
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1 vote
0 answers
29 views

Why do you only conjugate the first verb? [duplicate]

You don't get to see your sister cry. Why don't you conjugate the verb cry (...your sister cries)? Is it because is it the second verb (if that's the case, what is that rule called?) or is there ...
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  • 177
2 votes
1 answer
234 views

Should this verb be in the third-person singular form, the infinitive form, or the present participle form? [duplicate]

Watching a game review, I've noticed a phrase whose meaning confused me. The reason why I got confused is that the author used a base form of the verb "to explore" in pair with the singular ...
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  • 103
2 votes
2 answers
661 views

"Love to see this happen?" or 'Love to see this happens?" What's the grammar rule behind this? [closed]

It confuses me sometimes. It looks likes the former is far more common. But what's the logic behind that?
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0 votes
0 answers
60 views

See somebody do/doing something [duplicate]

Consider these two variations: Every morning, tourists can see soldiers raise the national flag in the square. Every morning, tourists can see soldiers raising the national flag in the square. What ...
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0 votes
1 answer
3k views

It sounds well or it sounds good? [duplicate]

Is it possible and correct to use "well" with "to sound"? I am under the impression that most natives find it wrong. For example: 1 The guitar sounds good. - OK 2 The guitar sounds well. - Possible? ...
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1 vote
2 answers
58 views

What part of speech is 'stumble' in this sentence?

I saw this sentence somewhere: 'This episode sees the heroine stumble upon a body.'. I know 'stumble' is a verb, but which part of the verb is being used here? I don't think I really know how to ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
185 views

what's the difference between "to hear" and "to listen"

I need to know the difference between "to hear" and "to listen". Could you explain it to me, please? I'm not a native English speaker.
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1 vote
1 answer
225 views

What is verb tense consistency?

"To his great astonishment and mortification, Sticky saw his parents begin trying less and less to find him, instead devoting their time and energy toward the proper disposal of their newfound riches" ...
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9 votes
1 answer
547 views

Discrepancy in using adjective or adverb with “taste”

One asks “how does x taste,” implying that they’d like an adverb describing the way it tastes. But one answers with an adjective, “it tastes good” instead of “it tastes well,” which would imply that x ...
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  • 269
-1 votes
1 answer
112 views

How is "swimming" being used grammatically in "I saw them swimming in the lake"?

Consider this sentence: I saw them swimming in the lake. How is "swimming" used in the sentence? Is it a gerund or verb or anything else and how is it connected to the sentence? I am mostly aware ...
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1 vote
0 answers
30 views

Sense verbs (see and hear) used in the progressive form (specific contexts) [duplicate]

I have a question about sense verbs used in the progressive form, namely "hearing" and "seeing" in the contexts like the ones presented in the attached images (the underscored fragments). Is there any ...
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2 votes
3 answers
2k views

Is there a term for using color to describe taste or flavor, instead of using the actual flavor?

For example, if someone says "this tastes purple" instead of saying it tastes like grape, or if asked what flavor of Gatorade you prefer you answer with, "blue". It also seems common with candy and ...
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  • 139
1 vote
1 answer
107 views

What tense is used for "go" in "you see it go away"? [duplicate]

I understand it's not the present tense, else it would be "goes". Is the sentence grammatically correct? If so, does it mean "you are seeing that it is going away"?
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11 votes
5 answers
5k views

Hear Me Roar Vs Hear Me Roaring? [duplicate]

In Katy Per­ry’s song “Roar”, she says this at the end of the cho­rus: You’re gonna hear me roar Why did she use the bare in­fini­tive form of the verb roar here in­stead of that ver­b’s ‑ing form?...
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0 votes
1 answer
5k views

When do I say "I have seen people do it" and not "I have seen people doing it"? [duplicate]

What is the difference between I have seen people do it and I have seen people doing it?
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2 votes
4 answers
730 views

Does "clack" necessarily refer to sound?

I have a question about the verb clack in the following paragraph taken from Sandkings by George R. R. Martin. In this paragraph, the protagonist, Simon Kress, is being shown a strange kind of ...
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2 votes
1 answer
1k views

Can one be "looking" surprised? [duplicate]

I was recently proofreading an ESL textbook and came across a photo of a woman. She had a surprised look on her face. Underneath were four options that the student was to pick. One of them was: "...
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17 votes
7 answers
46k views

"You hear but you don't listen" or "You listen but you don't hear"?

My teacher introduced the quote: You look but you don’t see. You hear but you don’t listen. But I also saw books saying: You look but you don’t see. You listen but you don’t hear. ...
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0 votes
1 answer
360 views

Verbs of senses in progressive tenses [closed]

How would a native speaker deal with this sentence I have seen him fight for his employees, I have seen him fight for his company, and now I am seeing him fight for our country. Is that childish?...
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0 votes
3 answers
23k views

What does this mean: "understanding you is like smelling the colour 9"?

I saw a quote that read as "understanding you is like smelling the colour 9" what does it mean? As it suggests it may mean finding something or someone hard to understand but why it's called ...
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0 votes
2 answers
2k views

Is the sentence "I saw him saying..." right?

Is the following sentence right in any way: I saw him saying that to the Chairman instead of the more acceptable I heard him saying that to the Chairman? I have a sense that the first ...
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0 votes
0 answers
70 views

I saw him going to city. I saw him go to city [duplicate]

1:I saw him going to city. 2:I saw him go to city. First one refers to Gerund. Second one refers to infinite. Do they have the same meanings or changed? Define it with reasons.
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3 votes
1 answer
1k views

Do fish smell or taste blood in water?

Which is the right verb to use? Is smelling as a verb strictly connected with air or what fish do is also called smelling? I ruled out "detect" as it sounds too formal, or is it?
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1 vote
1 answer
901 views

Can I say "listen for it" and "smell for it"?

I often hear the term to look for it: "I have studied symbolism in fine arts for years, and now I see symbolism in everything. I just can't stop myself after I learned how to look for it." Feel ...
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19 votes
13 answers
9k views

What's the Appropriate Word to Say You're 'Dazzled' by a Nice Smell?

Imagine there's food being cooked on stove and you feel the pleasant smell and it somehow makes you mad! You want to keep smelling or walk to the kitchen and get some of it to eat. What verb would you ...
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1 vote
1 answer
2k views

Time and "look back on" as a phrasal verb

When using this tri-part phrasal verb, i.e., "look back on," what is the length of time it refers to or can refer to? For example, it's common to say: "When John looks back on his childhood, he can ...
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0 votes
4 answers
591 views

Is there a word like behold and hark but for any combination of sensory methods e.g. "be-sense"

I am looking for a word similar to behold and hark which applies to calling attention to or attending with senses to some phenomenon using any combination of sensory methods/channels (light, sound, ...
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0 votes
3 answers
7k views

"Can see" or "see"?

In the song "Me Neither" Brad Paisley sings: "...would you like to dance Me neither I was just bein' polite Thank goodness my feet are much too tired I'm sure you're tired too, I can see an empty ...
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  • 1,356
1 vote
1 answer
1k views

Is usually tired, usually tired, and feels tired?

She is usually tired after coming back from school. She usually tired after coming back from school. She usually feels tired after coming back from school. Which one is correct? Also, are ...
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  • 15
3 votes
2 answers
2k views

Is there a neutral word for an olfactory impression?

While creating this proposal I was struggling to find the right words for olfactory impressions. Is there a neutral word for an olfactory impression? smell seems to have a negative connotation ...
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  • 495
0 votes
1 answer
12k views

"She always sees..." or "She is always seeing..."

She always sees things that don't exist. She is always seeing things that don't exist. In the first sentence we use verb "to see" in the present simple tense. In the second sentence, verb "to ...
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  • 49.1k
5 votes
2 answers
7k views

Intransitive verbs with preposition in passive sentences [duplicate]

The words listen, shout, etc. are intransitive verbs, but why are they used in passive sentences with preposition to, at, etc.? e.g: she was never listened to. I don’t like to be shouted at. ...
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  • 163
1 vote
3 answers
8k views

What do you call it when you can't smell something? [closed]

The man who cannot see is blind. The man who cannot hear is deaf. The man who cannot talk is mute. What is the man who cannot smell?
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1 vote
5 answers
455 views

How can I describe a passive type of touching?

If I touch an item (like a book) intentionally, I might say I touch the book. Now, if this had happened without my being aware of it, I would not say that I touched it, but I also would not say ...
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  • 15
0 votes
2 answers
4k views

In “can hear singing”, is “singing” a verb or a gerund?

In this sentence is singing a verb or a gerund? Look at the children whom you can hear singing.
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2 votes
5 answers
35k views

A Word To Represent The 5 Senses

Working on a game and I need a single word that represents the 5 senses: smell, touch, taste, sound, and sight. At the moment I'm using "perception" which I don't think is adequate.
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  • 245
2 votes
1 answer
35k views

"How it feels like" vs. "What it feels like"

I am not a native English speaker, and I'm always confused by people saying or writing "How it feels like" It doesn't sound right to me, and I am always trying to correct it to "What it feels ...
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  • 145
1 vote
4 answers
1k views

Any differences between "The police observed the man entering the bank." and "The police observed the man enter the bank. "

Are there any differences between "The police observed the man enter the bank." and "The police observed the man entering the bank. " Does sentence one mean that the police observed the whole process ...
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  • 179
5 votes
2 answers
36k views

What is wrong in saying " I am feeling well right now"...?

The following sentences are frequently heard spoken by people if someone asks them about their well-being (especially when a doctor inquires about a patient's health!) : I am not feeling well and ...
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0 votes
2 answers
323 views

"Made look better" vs. "made to look better"

Results are made to look better by... Results are made look better by... Are both correct? Is there another way of phrasing this sentence?
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  • 409
0 votes
2 answers
1k views

Initial "See, ..." or "Look, ..." usage

Which is correct to say 1. "Look , The situation was like that..." or "See, The situation was like that ....". 2. "Look , I am not involved in it..." or "See, I am not involved in it ...
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  • 193
3 votes
5 answers
1k views

Can a book have a feeling?

I was drawn to the expression, “The book feels expressive” in the following sentence of the article titled “The Battle Hymn of the Tiger Family” in The New Yorker February 4 issue: “In any case, it ...
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4 votes
2 answers
20k views

I saw her dance/dancing? I saw a flash of lightning strike/striking? I caught her steal/stealing? [duplicate]

Meta: I found a very similar post asking the difference between "I saw him cross" and "I saw him crossing". I have three additional questions on sentences of this form. In the post I am referring to, ...
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  • 41
0 votes
1 answer
8k views

'See' and 'Hear' in the progressive?

I'd like you to go into details about the difference between 'see', 'hear' and 'seeing', 'hearing'. I'm not a native speaker, so it's a bit hard to understand this explanation that 'see' and 'hear' ...
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  • 171
2 votes
4 answers
15k views

When someone says, "I do not feel that good", what does that mean?

I have heard it many times in movies and shows. I think it means "I do not feel very good" or "I do not feel as good as you think", but why do we use "that" here, and is it correct?
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  • 21
11 votes
4 answers
67k views

Is it really wrong to say "I'm hearing"?

Many grammar books claim that ‘see’, ‘hear’, ‘taste’, ‘smell’, ‘feel’ are verbs that aren’t used in continuous forms, and yet, we do hear and see it quite often used by native speakers. For instance, ...
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