Questions tagged [science]

The use of English in science.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
4answers
110 views

what does “known to fail” mean? [closed]

I read this phrase in "Curvelet based residual complexity objective function for non-rigid registration of pre-operative MRI with intra-operative ultrasound images." 2016: In the intensity-based ...
2
votes
1answer
618 views

Why does the suffix of “iodine” sound different in American and British English?

As an American, I noticed Fluorine and Iodine, though clearly sharing the same ending (and this was corroborated by etymonline.com; both contain the same chemical suffix) sounded different. Fluorine ...
12
votes
2answers
4k views

Should you say “0.9 second” rather than “0.9 seconds”?

When looking through the National Physical Laboratory's SI unit conventions, I have found a strange clause in their list: For unit values more than 1 or less than -1 the plural of the unit is ...
1
vote
1answer
249 views

Other ways of saying “versatile platform”?

In my research, I make use of a tool which provides a platform for researchers to investigate phenomenon X in a variety of ways. I want to frame it this way in a paper that I am writing: "Using the ---...
1
vote
4answers
2k views

Professional way of saying “without having to worry about”? [closed]

I am writing a scientific paper in which I am faced with writing a sentence like the following: "We can perform X without having to worry about the effects of Y". The phrase 'without having to worry ...
0
votes
3answers
674 views

Is air combustible, or incombustible? [closed]

I'm wondering if air—the everyday air we breathe, with oxygen, nitrogen, C02, etc.—can be defined as either combustible or incombustible. I would be inclined to say that our air is combustible, ...
1
vote
1answer
308 views

Amino acid vs. amino-acid [duplicate]

In the following two examples, is there any difference as to how amino acid should be hyphenated? There are twenty amino acids. The amino acid content is 80%. My intuition would be to hyphenate in ...
2
votes
2answers
87 views

Science Writing: Placement of Percentages and Numerical Raw Values

I am editing a biomedical review article for publication and the authors would like to display the percentage value with the corresponding raw values from the data. How do I format this? Example: "...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Name for the Study of Weapons, Guns, and Arms [closed]

What's the term to name the study (or science) of weapons, arms, and guns? I've come accross Ballistics, but it's limited and more mechanical term. And Military Science might be broader term. ...
1
vote
3answers
632 views

How to say that some (scientific) fact is not a coincidence?

I am writing a paper in which I would like to point to fact that some phenomenon is not a mere coincidence (and is relevant from point of view of the theory I work within), and afterwards I explain ...
0
votes
3answers
407 views

Pluralization of species names

Can you please guide me should we pluralize "painted stork" and "black-tailed godwits" in this sentence? Is there any rule regarding the names of species? Like which sentence makes sence and why? ...
0
votes
3answers
411 views

Can “statistically significant” be written as “significant”?

I am writing a paper for submission to a scientific journal. The paper calculates statistical significance for many different things. In the Results section, I find myself writing "X was statistically ...
0
votes
4answers
171 views

Word to explain “mapping the unseen to the seen” (i.e. infrared light to visible light)

There is a popular misconception that sound can travel through space. Since space is a vacuum, this isn't possible. Confusingly this scientific video describes "the sound two black holes make when ...
5
votes
3answers
499 views

What is a scientific term for a “game trail”

I've been trying to find scientific research concerning animals' tendency to adhere to certain worn paths, or "game trails". However, I have found very little and suspect the problem to be that a ...
8
votes
2answers
870 views

Is the use of the construct “loss in” acceptable in the following context?

Is the use of the construct loss in acceptable in this context? Symptoms of stroke include loss in sensory perception According to Grammarly, 'loss in' should be replaced with 'loss of'. But there ...
2
votes
3answers
9k views

Higher age or older age?

Which of the forms is correct: patients were of higher age or older age? Could both forms be used? I am asking for a formal use in medical scientific journals. The most suited form here would ...
3
votes
4answers
534 views

Word for magnifying eyepiece in scientific instruments

(Mostly) historic scientific instruments sometimes have a telescope-like device mounted on them in order to be able to read a very fine scale accurately. My understanding is that telescopes are used ...
0
votes
6answers
865 views

What word can I use to describe the process of something becoming hollow?

For example, if a solid metal rod is drilled down its longitudinal axis, the result will be a hollow cylinder. "The cylinder underwent... [blank]" In developmental biology, solid cords of ...
1
vote
1answer
133 views

Origin of the use of DNA as a metaphor

Sometimes I see sentences like "At [company name] excellent customer service is in our DNA". Obviously the writer isn't literally referring to DNA, but using it as a metaphor. When did DNA as a ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

What's the adjective of “plasma”? [closed]

What would be the adjective of plasma? I've heard both "plasmatic" and "plasmic", but which one refers to plasma in the medical sense, and which refers to the state of matter?
1
vote
4answers
2k views

Term for: “equal and opposite” and “sum to zero” (physics)

I'm looking for a word or term that encompasses both of the following conditions: equal and opposite AND sum to zero I am looking specifically at a term for a pairing relationship in the context ...
13
votes
2answers
3k views

Suffix ‘-ium’ vs. ‘-um’ in element names

Many chemical elements have the suffix ‘-ium’. However, exactly four elements – molyb­denum, tanta­lum, plat­inum, and lan­thanum – have the suffix ‘-um’ instead. Is there a difference between the ...
0
votes
1answer
456 views

Difference between “latent” and “underlying”

I'm not an English native speaker and I tend to use "latent" and "underlying" as if they were synonyms. Are they actually synonyms, or is there a difference between them ? For example, in a ...
1
vote
3answers
108 views

Describe a mathematical problem

How can I make the bold part of this sentence less awful? The symbolic regression problem is the problem of finding a closed form that models... You can move around the second part of the sentence,...
14
votes
9answers
6k views

Can a fact be 'biased'? [closed]

Apropos of this baffling exchange I had with a right-wing 'Brexit' supporter on on Twitter yesterday I'd like to know if my definition of a fact ('a thing that is known or proven to be true') is ...
1
vote
1answer
681 views

Equivalent to “pairwise” for a triplet [closed]

Pairwise may describe the process of comparing entities in pairs. What is the word for the process of describing the comparison of entities in triplet? [EDIT] Initial research found a single ...
2
votes
1answer
369 views

Word for flying, stinging/biting insects

Today an insect was flying around me and my family but I wasn't sure what type of insect it was. I could tell from the noise that the wings were making while it was flying that it was some type of bee ...
3
votes
2answers
452 views

A futuristic Phobia in the scientific context (Related to Artificial Intelligence)

Is there any specific term to describe a phobia about future of relationship between humans and (intelligent) machines? One may think it could be Cyberphobia or Mechanophobia, however these options ...
0
votes
1answer
914 views

Difference between “phenomenological” and “empirical”

Models in science are sometimes called "phenomenological" and sometimes "empirical." Looking at the definitions of these two words, I feel like they are really saying the same thing: that the model is ...
2
votes
1answer
218 views

How to pronounce the names of supersymmetric partner particles of fermions

The names of supersymmetric partner particles of fermions are formed by s- + the name of the normal particle. E.g.: sparticle sfermion squark sup sdown scharm sstrange stop sbottom slepton ...
0
votes
1answer
291 views

Capitalization after colons in a list

I have read about the rules for capitalization of colons and the varying rules depending on region and culture. So I decided to use the supposedly British grammar and only capitalize nouns or acronyms ...
0
votes
1answer
589 views

Scientific Nomenclature: italics or roman in an italic environment

Scientific Nomenclature says that: Italics are used for bacterial and viral taxa at the level of family and below. All bacterial and many viral genes are italicized. Serovars of Salmonella ...
5
votes
4answers
5k views

Difference between “rule” and “law” in scientific context

In general, according to an article in DifferenceBetween.net The main difference between rules and laws is the consequences associated with breaking them. While each is developed to invoke a ...
2
votes
2answers
10k views

Capitalisation of “Nature”

Why is "Nature" usually spelt with an initial capital letter in scientific journals? I am mainly referring to life science here, in case this matters. I am not talking about the obvious cases, like ...
0
votes
2answers
78 views

Active voice in mathematical physics derivation

Im currently writing an undergraduate physics report, collaborating with a large group of people. One of our sections requires some LONG lagrangian derivations for various systems. Now, everyone ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

Usage of the abbreviation resp. in scientific writing

Is it a good practice to use the abbreviation resp. for respectively in scientific writing ? Let consider the following sentence as example. "The word size (resp., word length) is defined as the ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

Is the sequence of words “modulus like parameter” meaningful?

Does the sequence of words "modulus like parameter" mean that the involved parameter can be considered as a modulus even though it can be something different in some cases ?
1
vote
2answers
217 views

Words describing constancy

Using only a single word in each case, I'm attempting to describe two different variations involving constancy of a certain attribute: Variation of an object without changing its weight. Variation of ...
0
votes
2answers
472 views

Can some refer pseudoscience by quasi-science? [closed]

reference link for the difference between pseudo and quasi at pseudo, quasi and semi Thanks to stack exchange [users] for making it clearer. Meanwhile, i found another useful blog defining the terms ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

Usage of 'that much more' in a scientific article

Would it be acceptable to use the phrase "that much more" in the context of a scientific article? Basically, I want to convey this: "The results were obtained doing A. We expect that doing B, taking ...
1
vote
1answer
77 views

“time” for instants or durations in science

I am trying to describe the evolution of a motion which is composed of smooth parts called "free flights" and instantaneous impacts. For example, consider a bouncing ball: its motion is a succession ...
9
votes
3answers
660 views

Is there a hypernym for acidity and basicity?

I was wondering if there was a single word for what the pH scale measures, with no particular bias to either the acidic end (acidity) or basic end (basicity) of the spectrum. From Wikipedia: In ...
2
votes
0answers
200 views

What is the meaning of the phrase “Signal Advance?”

I posted this question, “Signal Advance”: Unsure of meaning or contextual use, on Biology SE, as the phrase was used in a biology text that I am reading, Recombinant DNA; Genes and Genomes - A Short ...
0
votes
1answer
133 views

Using '+' and '-' with numbers

The convention for units is to leave a space after the number, for example, 'the average temperature of the human body is 37.0 °C.' But what if I need to explicitly state whether a number is positive ...
0
votes
3answers
484 views

What is an antonym for dense in the context of material properties?

I am looking for an antonym for dense in the context of material properties. Specifically, bulk materials which possess negligible porosity, i.e. sound materials. An example usage sentence might be ...
-2
votes
1answer
311 views

What is the English word used to describe something like m/s or m/s/s ? [closed]

In science, some quantities have units. e.g. Mass (kg) , time (s), distance (m). But what about quantities such as velocity (m/s) and acceleration (m/s/s) whose units are a combination of ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the difference between 'ad hoc' and 'heuristic'? [closed]

In engineering people tend to (at least in my mind) use these two terms pretty loosely. Now I don't care about the informal slang usage of the term, I just wish to know what is the difference in their ...
1
vote
2answers
685 views

What is this word in 19th century dictionary? [closed]

I was reading a passage from P. Austin Nuttall's 1869 book, Dictionary of Scientific Terms, and from what it looks like, in both the PDF and Page images views, the word seems to be pseudostella. ...
1
vote
2answers
809 views

Meteor & Meteorite is to Meteoroid as A & B is to Asteroid?

In astronomy, A meteoroid is what it is called before it enters a planet's atmosphere, A meteor is what it is called after it enters a planet's atmosphere but before it hits the surface, and A ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

Is there a more generic word for “space objects” (not counting human-made or massive objects)?

Basically, objects like Asteroids Meteoroids Meteors Meteorites Comets Etc. As stated in the title, this also doesn't count human-made objects, such as Space junk Satellites, Space stations, ...