Questions tagged [science]

The use of English in science.

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140 views

“Second-order approaches”. What does this mean?

I'm currently reading a scientific paper, in which the words "second-order approaches" are supposed to inform me about a certain solution to a problem. However, I don't have the slightest clue on what ...
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1answer
25 views

What is the correct way to write out species names in a scientific paper?

For example, in the phrase "The study organisms were adult rove beetle Atheta coriaria and adult ladybird Adalia bipunctata" Would it be correct to write "The study organisms were the adult rove ...
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1answer
79 views

What is a “launder stub”?

What is the meaning here of 'launder stub' in this summary from an abstract: The container is connected in parallel with a metal supply launder via transversal metal launder stubs respectively ...
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2answers
139 views

Word for common knowledge in a scientific setting?

I remember there being a single word to represent currently accepted facts in a scientific discipline. Common knowledge, but in a scientific setting. It is a jargon-y sounding word. You'd use it when ...
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2answers
15k views

Alternatives for “For the sake of completeness”?

I'd like to include in a paper on mathematics the phrase: "for the sake of completeness, we first show..." or words to that effect. However, the word "completeness" has a precise technical ...
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7answers
7k views

Is there a single word for both “atom” and “ion”?

When I'm writing about atoms, often what I'm writing about applies to (monatomic) ions too. It's slightly annoying to add "(or ions)" after every mention of atoms, where a word that refers to both ...
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2answers
74 views

What exactly does “*popular* science” mean, and what other words are there to denote things at the boundaries of “popular science” [closed]

people often make the distinction between "popular" science, and science published in specialist journal articles. If you go to the extremes, then the distinction is clear: A documentary by David ...
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4answers
117 views

Word meaning “regularly sampled”

I'm looking for a word that indicates something has been sampled (i.e, scientifically analyzed, measured, collected, etc.) multiple times within a span of time. Specifically, I want it to reflect "...
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1answer
235 views

What is the name of the natural force which makes water go against gravity?

Earlier today someone told me about a trick of watering plants when you are traveling. Basically, next to the plant there is a bowl of water with a tube inserted into it. At the end of the tube is the ...
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6answers
511 views

What is the adjective to describe research approaches lacking theory proof?

When I write an academic paper and describe one of the previous researches, I found that the method is only based on the authors' own claims and lacks theory proof. I am looking for a weak and ...
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4answers
1k views

I am looking for a word that can be used to describe a person who can switch bodies with another human

Not to be confused with a person who can morph themselves into someone else or a creature by will, but someone who has an ability to body swap - without necessarily having control over it. I am ...
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1answer
65 views

Scientific Writing: Acceptance of “one does”?

Essentially what the title says: Are formulations like "To determine the unknowns one employs the following conditions" acceptable for scientific writing? My professor insists that sentences like this ...
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1answer
87 views

'Average' vs 'Mean' - what's more scientifically accepted? [closed]

I'm working on a translation of a paper in portuguese to english. In this paper I work with the average of parameter, but I'm not sure if I should use the word 'average' or 'mean' (specially on ...
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0answers
51 views

can a figure in a paper be titled “questions respective [topic] ?”

I am currently writing a scientific paper in cooperation with multiple co-authors, some of them being more experienced than me. In a figure, questionnaire results are shown. One of my more ...
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2answers
244 views

Definite article before scientific terms named after people [duplicate]

This is my first post here so I hope the format of my question is correct. I am wondering whether it is necessary to use the definite article before physical quantities named after people, e.g.: ...
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2answers
66 views

are there words exist that are for foreign bodies that [closed]

So are there any words that differentiate foreign bodies in the human body that between neutral, beneficial, and disadvantageous foreign bodies.
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4answers
35k views

“We have showed that”/ “We have shown that” or “We showed that”?

In the summey of my physics paper, for a scientific journal, in the start of a new paragraph in the discussion, what is more correct to write? "We have showed that" the system obeys this and that ...
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1answer
60 views

Present simple in the abstracts of scientific papers

Passive sentences with present simple tense are extensively used in the abstracts of scientific papers. For example, we may read In this work, the melting point of copper is calculated with a ...
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2answers
245 views

What was the definition of “planet” like in English in the XVIII century?

I recently asked a question (in Spanish, sorry) in the Spanish Language stack about the peculiar definition that the Royal Spanish Academy included in its very first dictionary. It goes like this: ...
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3answers
62 views

Adjective for combining some lower dimensional objects to form a higher dimensional object

Are there some English words that describe the dimension of objects changed, by combining some lower dimensional objects to form a higher dimensional object. For example, from the lower dimensional ...
2
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1answer
279 views

Is “epidemiology” an appropriate word for the study of invasive species in an ecosystem?

I'm looking for a technical term to describe the study of infestations of invasive species. It seems that "epidemiology" is defined (by WHO) as the study of the distribution and determinants of ...
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3answers
1k views

Term of solid phase floating on surface of liquid phase

I am looking for what to call the solid or dust particles that reside at the surface of a liquid after density separation by flotation. I had the term supernatant in mind, but I looked it up and it ...
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1answer
130 views

Synonym for a conclusion [closed]

I'm currently writing a scientific article and thus, I need to be very careful with my English. In this article I usually show graphics and describe them: "Fig. X show the temperature variation..."...
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2answers
443 views

What do you call the new pattern that we perceive in the relative movement of patterned objects?

Sometimes a purely static image will appear to be moving because of some design feature. That’s not what I’m asking about. I’m asking about an illusion that arises only through real movement ...
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1answer
999 views

Guided rockets Vs Missiles [closed]

In the context of military weapon and ammunition, missiles are said to be guided but rockets are not. yet the latest trends of rocket says, there are rockets with guidance system, though they are ...
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3answers
1k views

What is a more professional term for the 'back-of-the-envelope' calculation?

What is a more professional term for the phrase 'back-of-the-envelope' calculation, used by scientists and such as a word for a very basic, general first calculation?
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2answers
149 views

“by virtue of Remark 1” in a math paper

I'm helping to translate a math paper into English. There's this sentence that starts "By virtue of Remark 1, ...". The papers in the Google Scholar search results for the phrase seem to be ...
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0answers
33 views

Should I use capital letter in scientific tests for refering sections? I.e. Section 1.2 or section 1.2? [duplicate]

The question is simple, should I write "In this section..." or "In this Section" "In this chapter..." or "In this Chapter" ?
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1answer
584 views

Is it okay to say from “ the physics point of view ” ?

So I am a mathematician, and I am trying to explain the consequence of an equation from " the physiscs points of view". Is it okay to state it in this manner: "from the physics point of view " ?
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1answer
282 views

Where to use a hyphen with the abbreviation of a chemical element (e.g. C, N, P)?

Working on a scientific paper I stumble over the use of common abbreviations for chemical elements (e.g. C, N or P for carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus) in combination with other nouns or adjectives. ...
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2answers
694 views

Is there a phrase to refer to the moment of the full moon?

From Wikipedia: A full moon is often thought of as an event of a full night's duration. This is somewhat misleading because its phase seen from Earth continuously waxes or wanes (though much too ...
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1answer
57 views

“Law” or “principle” or “rule”?

I write an essay on typography. I want to keep it more or less informal but still with some structural highlights. Typical presentation for central ideas (sort of "bullet points"), will be in such ...
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1answer
190 views

What is someone who works with optical fibres and light called? [closed]

I would like to know the name of a person who works with lasers and optical fibers? I have tried searching on google and asking people that I could get any answer from.
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1answer
159 views

Is the term 'affectation status' generally accepted?

The word affectation is defined by Merriam-Webster as: a :speech or conduct not natural to oneself :an unnatural form of behavior meant especially to impress others His French accent is just ...
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0answers
15 views

Guiding tables below the maps and color-coded tables in English [duplicate]

Usually, there is a guiding table below the maps and color-coded tables, to help reader what is the meaning of each color or element. What is that table called in English?
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2answers
244 views

Lanthanum vs lanthanium

All lanthanides except for lanthanum have suffix "-ium". Why lanthanum is so special, and why this particular word form has been considered canonical? Is using of "lanthanium" these days allowed, or ...
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2answers
186 views

Can “up to” mean neglecting, ignoring, excluding…?

In scientific writing my professor (not a native English speaker) sometimes uses "up to SOMETHING" with the intention of expressing that SOMETHING is neglected, ignored, or excluded (see the examples ...
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4answers
91 views

Word for data/information from medical scanner

I need a word for "information from a scanning as it appears in the image used for diagnostics". My context is medical (physics). SPECT and CT are two scanning techniques with different ...
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3answers
5k views

Word for a hope for something that is unlikely to happen [closed]

What is a word that can be used to describe the feeling of looking forward to something that probably will not happen? preferably one that might refer to an experiment
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1answer
72 views

Word for class of equipment that applies a physical quantity on a thing

I am looking for a word that describes the class of (lab-)instruments whose primary purpose is to force a physical quantity onto something. This should be different from instruments whose primary ...
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2answers
4k views

Is there a term for a disease that is spread ONLY from person to person?

I'm looking for a term to describe a disease that is spread ONLY from person to person, not from animal to person (zoonosis): Zoonosis: any disease of animals communicable to humans (Dictionary.com)...
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1answer
232 views

Preferences and reasons for the use of “prey” as a verb instead of “predate”?

As an entomologist I must write and review manuscripts every day. English is my second language, and luckily the main idiom for scientific writing and discussion. I am often of two minds about the ...
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0answers
439 views

is sediment countable

I am using the word 'sediment' quite a lot for my research. I work in the field of river engineering and I always thought 'sediment' to be uncountable. However, a colleague uses 'sediments' to mean ...
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2answers
75 views

Problem in understanding a sentence

I am a native german speaker and I have a problem in understanding a question in an assignment which I have to solve. What does this sentence mean: "Plot the total consumption D over the interval I, ...
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1answer
2k views

Word or phrase with a similar meaning to 'statistical difference '

I am explaining my results in my paper. I am looking for a word or phrase with similar meaning to 'statistical difference'. If one performs a statistical test for a difference in the mean or median ...
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4answers
20k views

How many moons are in a week?

Often—in fiction—a character might say, "it's been seven moons since the death of my aunt Wilma." What exactly is a "moon"? How many moons are in an hour, in a day, in a week? I'm scientifically ...
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3answers
1k views

“There exists” vs “There is determined”

Mathematical writing tend to be very repetitive. To be clear, I do not consider this as something necessarily evil: Mathematics is a language in its own right, and a very technical one, where most of ...
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3answers
80 views

Is there any difference between the usages of “neutralise” and “balance” for charge cancellation in scientific context?

For example, in the text below, which is from a research paper, they have used both of them, repeatedly, and it seems that they are interchangeable. ..."the positive sites are predominantly charge-...
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2answers
58 views

A scientific term for 'beginning of sampling in a signal'

I have a Signal of 3 seconds. At different times I start sampling(extract samples) . I need a word that refers to the beginning of each sampling in the signal. I thought of starting point but I am ...
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2answers
45 views

What scientific field studies diagnostics?

What is the name of the field of scientific study which covers "the process of diagnosing the cause of problems", independent of any specific knowledge domain? i.e. it would cover the common elements (...