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Questions tagged [science]

The use of English in science.

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4
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1answer
106 views

Is there a word in logic, or science, that means getting the right conclusion from the wrong set of presumptions?

Is there a word in logic, or science, that means getting the right conclusion from the wrong set of presumptions? Or alternatively, something is correct, but the explanation of why is incorrect. Is ...
-1
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1answer
30 views

Let us suppose vs Suppose [closed]

When should we use "Let us suppose", and when "Suppose" in science academic articles? Example 1: Suppose the electric field lines in a region of space are straight lines. or ...
0
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1answer
142 views

Word for falsely declaring something an anomaly, when it is actually typical?

Is there a term for incorrectly distinguishing something to be not part of a common category of items, saying a sub-group is too unique to be considered to be part of the larger category, even though ...
3
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3answers
5k views

Active vs Passive voice in lab reports, and history of scientific usage

I've had some discussions in the past with TA's who would tell my undergrads "Lab reports are written in the passive voice". Aside from whether or not this is correct (let's come back to that in a ...
3
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2answers
5k views

Usage of the abbreviation resp. in scientific writing [closed]

Is it a good practice to use the abbreviation resp. for respectively in scientific writing ? Let consider the following sentence as example. "The word size (resp., word length) is defined as the ...
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2answers
2k views

When should scientific disciplines be capitalized?

When writing motivation letters like SoP, or any other formal text, I don't know whether I have to capitalize sciences or areas of research. For example: I have been introduced to Neuroscience. ...
2
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1answer
66 views

The pronunciation of sciurine (pertaining to squirrels)

I am intrigued by the pronunciation for the adjective for squirrel, "sciurine". In Wiktionary, the pronunciation in IPA is '/ˈsaɪjʊɹaɪn/' ('/ˈsʌɪjᵿrʌɪn/' in the OED online), which strikes me ...
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2answers
102 views

abbreviations for "standard deviation" when used as an informal unit

I am looking for some advice for abbreviating "standard deviation" when it is used in an informal sense as a mathematical unit, especially with regard to financial usage. This often crops up ...
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0answers
13 views

Synonym for un-scientific book by researcher

I am looking for a synonym for a kind of book/genre, that contains interesting information, but is not aimed at the scientific community, being polemical / political and not stringent enough to be ...
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4answers
2k views

I am looking for a word that can be used to describe a person who can switch bodies with another human

Not to be confused with a person who can morph themselves into someone else or a creature by will, but someone who has an ability to body swap - without necessarily having control over it. I am ...
3
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4answers
14k views

Higher age or older age?

Which of the forms is correct: patients were of higher age or older age? Could both forms be used? I am asking for a formal use in medical scientific journals. The most suited form here would ...
1
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1answer
20 views

Term to describe how much something has changed from its original configuration

Is there a term that describes how far removed or how many change steps are between two given states or configurations? Complexity is a term to describe that something is intricate or complicated, but ...
0
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1answer
77 views

Word for a physicist studying mechanics?

For many fields there is a word for a person studying it. In math there is analyst for analysis, algebraist for algebra, and geometer for geometry. Is there an equivalent word for a physicist studying ...
11
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10answers
6k views

Single word to replace "allowed to be missing"

I want to express my knowledge about the presence of absence of something. My knowledge is divided into three different cases: I know that the thing doesn't exist. I don't know whether the thing ...
0
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2answers
40 views

What does this sentence actually mean?

I have encountered this sentence in an editing assignment Many patients continue to have pain and limited function and require some other forms of treatment. I was wondering if this is equivalent to ...
0
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1answer
2k views

Would you write "an error was fixed" in scientific work?

I am not sure if Error ABC was fixed by preprocessing algorithm XYZ. is "slang". Can it be written in scientific work? Is there a better way to say it? The context is in machine learning, where a ...
0
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2answers
201 views

Translating a scientific paper from American to British

Over the last few years I have translated into English a fair amount of scientific papers for a Mexican scientist. Throughout this time, I noticed that by far the most common style requirement was ...
0
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2answers
78 views

"-Based" vs. " Based"

I am in the process of finalizing an academic research paper and I am struggling to identify the correct hyphenation for the title: Option 1: Adaptive Chirplet Transform-Based Machine Learning for ...
4
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3answers
2k views

Term of solid phase floating on surface of liquid phase

I am looking for what to call the solid or dust particles that reside at the surface of a liquid after density separation by flotation. I had the term supernatant in mind, but I looked it up and it ...
2
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2answers
193 views

Can "up to" mean neglecting, ignoring, excluding...?

In scientific writing my professor (not a native English speaker) sometimes uses "up to SOMETHING" with the intention of expressing that SOMETHING is neglected, ignored, or excluded (see the examples ...
1
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2answers
162 views

Is it redundant to say "global pandemic"? [duplicate]

It seems that the word pandemic is generally understood to refer to a large or global geographic area. Is it therefore redundant to say "global pandemic" in a sentence such as, "The ...
0
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2answers
79 views

Is there any single word in English to represent domain of "logic and science" together?

Is there any single word in English to represent domain of "logic and science" together? Background Some of my friends are going to start an online movement whose main purpose would be ...
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0answers
68 views

Is "get stuck" a proper term in academic writing?

I am writing to inquire the usage of "get stuck" in academic writing. Here is my draft: this design could get stuck in a bad local minima and therefore is not desired. I use Google Scholar to ...
1
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1answer
96 views

Is there a word to describe a plausible but incorrect explanation? [duplicate]

I'm thinking of something where somebody (with no malicious intention) offers a very plausible and scientific-sounding explanation (not a theory but something presented as a series of facts) such that ...
1
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1answer
89 views

Mathematical Jargon when choosing for determinacy

What is the usual expression a mathematician uses when he has to make a choice in order limit an over-determined structure, in order to continue his argument? For instance, when a structure is over-...
0
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1answer
25 views

Phrases for qualitative comparison

Suppose we have find a relation between two quantities X and Y. When we say "The more Y, the more X" is it implied that the relation between Y and X is linear?
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0answers
27 views

Why does the term Petri Dishes appear so regularly in political discourse nowadays?

On three occasions on Twitter and other social media platforms, the term "Petri Dishes" appears in a non-scientific context. Is this just a recent fad? It appears to be in the lexicon of many of our ...
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2answers
57 views

A better word/phrase to describe "a more..." in a scientific paper

I am writing a scientific paper on how a cancer staging system may be improved. However, I am a non-native English speaker, and I am concerned that my current title reflects that too much. Please, ...
0
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0answers
92 views

Word for meaning across the solar system

Is there a single term in english that means "to cross or to traverse a solar system"? For crossing the Atlantic we have transatlantic, to cross the continent we have transcontinental and even to ...
0
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2answers
383 views

Does "corroborate" in a scientific context imply confirmation rather "either confirmation or rejection" of findings from previous studies?

I am a non-native English speaker writing a scientific paper. I have question concerning the word corroborate. In my native language, one might say that a research project aim to corroborate ...
0
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1answer
64 views

Should I use a hyphen in "patient tailored" vs "patient-tailored"?

Being a non-native English speaker, I was wondering which is most correct? (1) Patient-tailored staging of xx carcinoma, or (2) Patient tailored staging of xx carcinoma? It is for a scientific ...
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2answers
565 views

Pluralization of species names

Can you please guide me should we pluralize "painted stork" and "black-tailed godwits" in this sentence? Is there any rule regarding the names of species? Like which sentence makes ...
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0answers
45 views

Are the words bathymetry and bathymetric interchangable?

In my mind these both work... 1) I performed a bathymetry survey. I gave the client the bathymetry data. 2) I performed a bathymetric survey. I gave the client the bathymetric data. A web search ...
1
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1answer
61 views

How to describe factors leading to a negative event?

Being a non-native English speaker, I am looking for an appropriate verb/phrase to describe the negative event as consequence of two health factors. My best shot is "precipitate"; however, I am ...
1
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2answers
76 views

Can a model or hypothesis "assume?"

The model assumes such and such. The hypothesis assumes such and such. In scientific writing, I commonly see similar phrases indicating the construction or use of a model with an assumption. It is so ...
0
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1answer
267 views

What does "has been described in other work" mean in this sentence? [closed]

I'm currently reading a book about chemistry. Here is a sentence that I faced and didn't understand: This procedure has been described in other work from our laboratory I don't get what it ...
1
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2answers
149 views

"Second-order approaches". What does this mean?

I'm currently reading a scientific paper, in which the words "second-order approaches" are supposed to inform me about a certain solution to a problem. However, I don't have the slightest clue on what ...
3
votes
4answers
36k views

"We have showed that"/ "We have shown that" or "We showed that"?

In the summey of my physics paper, for a scientific journal, in the start of a new paragraph in the discussion, what is more correct to write? "We have showed that" the system obeys this and that ...
11
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3answers
2k views

Did the meaning of "significant" change in the 20th century?

In Do We Really Need the S-word? in 'American Scientist', the author Megan D. Higgs writes Did the people who introduced the word’s use in statistics intend for it to be interpreted according to ...
0
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1answer
52 views

How to avoid overusing 'the' in objective writing

I'm writing an experimental process description and I feel like i'm overusing 'the'. The plastic tube leading out the bottom of the Vayyar equipment (again the tube on the left) is fed through ...
1
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1answer
63 views

Word for an object involved in a collision?

I want a word that is used to mean an object involved in a collision, for example, say two tennis balls collide - ball 1 and ball 2 - what would be a word that could describe either ball, only in the ...
0
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1answer
33 views

Should I use the formula or the name of the chemical in a sentence?

In a scientific paper, when quoting a chemical, is it more appropriate to write its formula or its name? For example: Ion exchange removed nitrate ions from solution. Or: Ion exchange removed ...
0
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2answers
194 views

When should antibody/antigen be pluralised?

I am doing my thesis corrections, and my examiner (an engineer) has different ideas about whether the word should be pluralised than those I am used to, as I am a non-biochemist, I wanted advice on ...
5
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4answers
6k views

Difference between "rule" and "law" in scientific context

In general, according to an article in DifferenceBetween.net The main difference between rules and laws is the consequences associated with breaking them. While each is developed to invoke a ...
1
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1answer
96 views

"This/That is, " used at the beginning of a sentence to clarify a concept from the previous sentence

According to an English native speaker who works with me, the "This is" bit in the following sentence should be replaced by "That is": In fact, the feature space need not be unique. This is, for a ...
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1answer
43 views

What is the meaning of the following sentence: [closed]

But why would a strong, inheritable trait that cuts fitness by half not be selected against?
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2answers
5k views

Suffix ‘-ium’ vs. ‘-um’ in element names

Many chemical elements have the suffix ‘-ium’. However, exactly four elements – molyb­denum, tanta­lum, plat­inum, and lan­thanum – have the suffix ‘-um’ instead. Is there a difference between the ...
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1answer
35 views

An alternative for genetive case with of in scientific writing

I am writing a scientific paper and have a following dillema between two sentences: Therefore, it is reasonable to analyze the effect of the mutual coupling in the proposed application. vs. ...
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2answers
322 views

Electricity withdrawal

We commonly say "electricity consumption" for both : the electric energy actually consumed by appliances the electric energy drawn from the grid by a house, measured by a meter (what appears on your ...
3
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1answer
10k views

How to abbreviate "section" and "sections" in scientific writing

What are the correct abbreviation of words "section" and "sections" in a scientific writing? Sec. and Secs. or Sect. and Sects. ?

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