Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Questions tagged [russian]

Russian is an East Slavic language spoken around the world.

3
votes
1answer
72 views

Translate Russian “ненаглядный” to English [closed]

How can you translate the Russian word "ненаглядный" preserving its meaning and semantics? It is usually translated as dear or beloved but these words does not have the original meaning of the Russian ...
1
vote
1answer
116 views

What do native English speakers mean by “Russian”?

When you're translating a text containing the word Russian from English to Russian, you must be aware of the context, because it can mean "a citizen of Russia, regardless of ethnicity" (россиянин), or ...
1
vote
2answers
472 views

Is it correct to say “collect puzzle (jigsaw)”? [closed]

Fun fact: there is no word for "Jigsaw puzzle" in Russian, so the English word "Пазл" is used. "Собирать" means collect (berries) or assemble (from parts). "Collect puzzle" seems like a direct ...
1
vote
0answers
45 views

Unreal conditional for future in question

I have a real trouble to properly translate to English following Russian phrase 'У вас будет хоть что-то более интересное, чем это?'. As far as I can understand, it's a question with unreal condition ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Difference between /æ/ and /ɛ/

I can see that several questions (1, 2) have already been asked about this, but I would like to ask specifically in the context of Russian phonetics. Russian is my native language, but I'm fluent in ...
2
votes
2answers
207 views

What do you call someone who studies Russia?

This is my first post and I was wondering what do you call someone who studies Russia For a living like has an academic researcher or Scholar. A sentence would be I work has a -word-. Thanks in ...
0
votes
0answers
179 views

Terminal “f” versus “ff” in anglicized Russian surnames

Today, foreign names are anglicized more or less systematically from their original spelling: the Russian surname "Петров" generally becomes "Petrov", not the calqued "Peterson" or the more phonetic "...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

Something similar to “stir up/kick hornets' nest”

stir up hornets' nest -- is an idiom similar to what I want. The difference is that I want something like with the meaning "break the order that's been around for a long time". Not necessarily cause a ...
1
vote
3answers
300 views

English equivalent to Russian “Ты обалдел/офигел/etc.?”

Basically, "обалдеть/офигеть/охренеть" and their vulgar counterparts in Russian are informal and quite expressive words of shock and surprise. – Our country has won 50 medals total at the Olympics....
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Why is the word “Cyrillic” pronounced with a soft “c”?

Why is the word "Cyrillic" pronounced with a soft "c" at the start of the word, when the pronunciation of the word in Russian and Mongolian sounds more like a hard "c"?
0
votes
1answer
225 views

A form of grammar- what is this called

I want to say the following sentence, You will now eat, at my house This type of usage, although not common in the US or UK is very common for speakers from Europe or Russia when they speak English. ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

What does that mean “had you not seen” [closed]

This is an extract from text about restaurant of the future http://www.eater.com/2015/9/14/9310919/restaurant-of-the-future I am confused about this sentence: "You would be impressed had you not ...
0
votes
2answers
97 views

Meaning of “The retail stores are a way to help people get exposed to the lifestyle,”

From http://fortune.com/2015/07/23/bulletproof-coffee-funding/ Asprey sees the coffee shop locations as an important way to hook new customers on the high-calorie concoction. As he said, anybody ...
2
votes
4answers
565 views

English equivalent of 'стерпится - слюбится'?

Are there any proverbs in the English-speaking world that are close in their meaning to the Russian proverb "стерпится - слюбится"? Meaning of the proverb: if you do something unpleasant at first for ...
1
vote
1answer
138 views

Translation of the Russian term “распорядок дня” [closed]

Russian has the term "Распорядок дня." It means a to-do list of things that you do every day or your "order of life" (routine). For example: Get up at 7:00 Work from 9:00 to 15:00 Go to sleep ...
17
votes
14answers
4k views

Idiom for someone “not from this world”?

Are there idioms (or single words) in English for people who behave like they have come from another world where everything is perfect and know nothing about the reality? They usually come up with ...
2
votes
5answers
2k views

Usage of kh in transliteration of Cyrillic, hebrew and others

I'm not a native english speaker and I'm sometimes baffled by the appearance of "kh" in Russian names and other words (for instance the russian lunar rover "Lunokhod"). In this case, the sensible ...
26
votes
10answers
6k views

Idiom for “the first attempt (of something) is never right”

In Russian there's a saying that 'the first crepe always comes out wrong' (literally 'stuck together into a ball'), meaning that you'll have to try more than once to succeed at something - because ...
10
votes
5answers
3k views

Equivalent for the Russian idiom “to write into the drawer”

There is following idiom in Russian "to write into the drawer" which is being used to describe situation when writer or scientist writes (sometimes prolifically) without publishing anything. Are there ...
4
votes
1answer
540 views

What is the English equivalent of the Russian saying “my ears are curling into tubes”?

Background: Russians use this saying to describe extreme heat conditions in "Banya" when it is becoming almost unbearable. Russian Мои уши в трубочку сворачиваются? English literal translation My ...
79
votes
28answers
92k views

Idiom or word for a very crowded place

There is a popular idiom in Russian for describing a really crowded place: "(there's) no room for an apple to fall" ("яблоку негде упасть"). I struggle to think of anything similar in English, and ...
13
votes
6answers
27k views

Russian speakers and “I feel myself to be …”

I was told that it is a typical mistake for Russian speakers to say I feel myself badly instead of I feel ill. I wonder to what extent such constructs sound wrong to native speakers? I feel ...
29
votes
8answers
4k views

Are there shibboleths specific to native Russian speakers?

I am doing these days a lot of collaborative writing with a colleague born and raised in Russia, and now working in the US. He has a very good English and yet, as we circulated various texts, I ...