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Questions tagged [roots]

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9
votes
3answers
15k views

What are words called that share the same root?

What do you call words that share the same root (e.g., "network", "networks", "networking"). Also, does the shortest one of them have a specific name (e.g., "network")?
11
votes
4answers
18k views

Pterodactyl and Archeopteryx: Silent P vs Voiced P

These words share the Greek root πτέρυξ (pteryx), meaning feather/wing, but the P in pterodactyl is silent (in the initial position), while the P in archeopteryx (in the middle of the word) is voiced. ...
7
votes
3answers
10k views

Why A is pronounced differently in “opacity” and “opaque”

When I look at pronunciation guides for opacity and opaque I see the following: opaque: oh-peyk (a hard A) opacity: oh-pas-i-tee (a soft A) Since their root seems to be the Latin opācus, why ...
17
votes
10answers
10k views

What is the opposite of an epiphany?

I think of an epiphany as a "eureka moment" as in a goldminer crying out, "Eureka!" upon discovering a vein of gold (I'm a native Californian (and former resident of Eureka), so that example comes ...
2
votes
4answers
5k views

Podiatrist vs. pedometer vs. pedophile?

I was just discussing oddities of English with a friend, and I realized something that neither of us could explain. A podiatrist is a foot doctor. A podium is something you stand behind when giving ...
0
votes
3answers
9k views

“Thou” or “You”? This is the problem!

In some eastern Indo-European languages like Persian specially in its northern accent Gilaki, the words "thou", "thee", "thy",... have a same meaning and pronunciation as English. But there is a ...
5
votes
1answer
8k views

“No less than” idiom root

I know that "No less than somebody/something" means that this somebody/something is important. What I don't understand is why this idiom means so!! What I literally understand is that "No less than" ...
69
votes
2answers
4k views

Etymology of “fairy”

All the standard dictionaries--with the notable exception of the OED--seem to trace the etymology of fairy through Old French fae to Latin fata, meaning "the fates" or "the goddess of fate". As a ...
8
votes
3answers
1k views

What do I call a word with roots from multiple languages?

As best as I can tell, a good example is sociopath: sociopath — from socio- on model of psychopath socio- — combining form of [Latin] socius pathos — from [Greek] pathos ...
-2
votes
1answer
1k views

Root word homo in homosexual? Is there a word like misandry specifically for gay men? [closed]

I'm confused why homosexual is used to refer to gay people. From my understanding homo means human? As in homosapien. Also is there a term like misandry specifically for gay men?