Skip to main content

Questions tagged [rhymes]

For questions about rhyme, or words that have the same sound as one another. ('pique' and 'leek', 'steep' and 'leap', etc.)

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
1 vote
0 answers
56 views

Is the rhyme scheme about the ending sound or two sounds? [closed]

I'm an English language arts teacher, and I teach poetry. Used to tell my students that the rhyme scheme is about the ending sound of each line; like AABB, ABAB, etc. And when you find multiple lines ...
Ibrahim Fathy's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
116 views

Do any words rhyme with ‘doll’ in American English? [closed]

Since doll–dole merged in British English but not in American English, what are other examples of words that rhyme with doll in American English? https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Rhymes:English/%C9%92l ...
iopq's user avatar
  • 131
12 votes
1 answer
1k views

Syndrome: older pronunciation?

Recently, I was reading The Kenneth Williams Diaries, and in one entry he records correcting some pronouncing syndrome (rhyming with aerodrome) to rhyming with epitome. I cannot find this ...
William Crawford's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
78 views

Is there a term for sets of words that alliterate and rhyme with each other?

Can English have words that are both alliterations and also rhyme? is looking for the sets of words that I want to put a specific term to. Sets of words such as: divide, deride, decide alliance, ...
Malady's user avatar
  • 807
0 votes
0 answers
63 views

Phrase Request: Lyric Subversion [duplicate]

I've noticed this quite often from Disney sound tracks. Lyrics are in a certain rhyming scheme - one line happens and the next line approaches the end of the line, but the last word subverts the rhyme....
goodguy5's user avatar
  • 239
3 votes
2 answers
123 views

Eighteenth-century pronounciation of "wax"

In "Against Idleness and Mischief"(1715) ("How doth the little busy bee"), Isaac Watts rhymes "wax" and "makes". Were these two words pronounced the same at the ...
Tevildo's user avatar
  • 1,293
0 votes
0 answers
51 views

Are there any words that perfectly rhyme with the past tense of -ɪdəl words, that aren't conjugations of other words?

-ɪdəl words. I'm looking for perfect rhymes with "riddled" that aren't just other forms of other words. Do any exist?
Malady's user avatar
  • 807
10 votes
2 answers
7k views

Do "map" and "cat" rhyme?

Do the words map and cat rhyme? I'm of the opinion that they do because—even though they end with different sounds—the vowel sound is the same. Please help settle a debate between my children and me.
jlconlin's user avatar
  • 305
18 votes
5 answers
4k views

Do 'ration' and 'station' rhyme in any English accents?

In Kipling's Bridge Guard in the Karoo, there is a verse We stumble on refuse of rations, The beef and the biscuit-tins; We take our appointed stations, And the endless night begins. 'Ration' and '...
joelw's user avatar
  • 299
10 votes
3 answers
4k views

Did “find” rhyme with “joined” in the 18th century?

I notice that in Alexander Pope's poem, An Essay on Criticism (1711), lines 669-70, there is the following couplet: In grave Quintilian’s copious works we find The justest rules and clearest method ...
Emma Dash's user avatar
  • 1,972
19 votes
5 answers
4k views

Did the words "come" and "home" historically rhyme?

The third stanza of the hymn Amazing Grace is Thro' many dangers, toils, and snares,     I have already come; 'Tis grace hath brought me safe thus far,     And grace will lead me home. In this hymn ...
yannis's user avatar
  • 433
0 votes
2 answers
80 views

What are multiword homonyms called? [closed]

For an example like “Francis Bacon” vs “France is Bacon”, what is this called, and how can I find more common examples of them? It comes up a lot in speech recognition machine learning, or simply ...
SwimBikeRun's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
104 views

Rhyming answers with implicit irritation to the words like "where", "who", "well", etc

‎Are there any rhyming words with which one answers to or comments the words like "where", "who", "how" or "so" and "well" or "like" (which ...
Marie Mit's user avatar
  • 301
0 votes
1 answer
43 views

Do precious and pretentious rhyme? [closed]

Do the words precious and pretentious rhyme? What are the relevant rhyme rules? Both words end in « ious » , and they are both pronounced consistently. However, when saying them out loud, they don’t ...
bob's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
74 views

Reading of Swift's On Poetry correctly

Jonathan Swift wrote once that So, naturalists observe, a flea Hath smaller fleas that on him prey; And these have smaller still to bite 'em; And so proceed ad infinitum. You can see that to bite '...
user58697's user avatar
  • 133
6 votes
2 answers
947 views

What does this bit of Cockney mean?

In the 2nd episode of the 3rd season of Would I Lie To You?, a fragment is shown from a 1985 episode of London Weekend Television's The Six O'Clock Show, with someone purporting to be a former Teddy ...
SQB's user avatar
  • 421
2 votes
3 answers
756 views

Looking for two synonyms for success/failure which rhyme [closed]

I’m looking for two words with the following conditions: Word A is a synonym of “success” (or is the word “success”). Word B is a synonym of “failure” (or is the word “failure”). Words A and B rhyme. ...
Senseful's user avatar
  • 2,249
0 votes
1 answer
70 views

Does broidered rhyme with whirred?

Does broidered rhyme with whirred? https://www.rhymezone.com/r/rhyme.cgi?Word=whirred&typeofrhyme=perfect&org1=syl&org2=l&org3=y Rhymezone says it doesn't rhyme, but another dictionary ...
Sayaman's user avatar
  • 121
6 votes
2 answers
349 views

What is the name of the poetic device where the author creates neologisms/malaprops to complete the rhyme?

I just learned about slant rhyming where you use a distorted not quite rhyme. Emily Dickinson is noted or these. (I personally don't like these, as they distract. Much like trying to make a pun on ...
Sherwood Botsford's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
169 views

Wordsmith, singer, Leonard Cohen was perplexed as what word rhymes with orange? [duplicate]

My first question was basically, "What word, or words, rhyme with orange? The word "tinge" was not included in any of the answers, or words presented to me. Thank you for your patience ...
Campaigner8's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
560 views

How were 'eyes' and '-ies' pronounced in Shakespeare's times? [duplicate]

Reading through 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' I've noticed that Shakespeare repeatedly rhymed 'eyes' with some of the words ending with '-ies' (e.g. 'companies', 'qualities'). Obviously that means that ...
xyzyx's user avatar
  • 31
0 votes
0 answers
101 views

Shakespeare's dubious rhymes [duplicate]

Background I'm reading A Midsummer Night's Dream, and a lot of the dialogues and monologues are rhymes. But some times, these rhymes aren't rhymes at all. For instance So should the murder'd look, ...
Alec's user avatar
  • 159
1 vote
4 answers
120 views

What term would describe the following poetry elements like rhyme, alliteration, assonance, etc. that relate to the way the word is sounded?

I'm looking for a word that categorizes rhyme, alliteration, assonance, etc. that relate to the way the word is sounded into one group/word. I hear that it could be called "sound devices" ...
CreativiTimothy's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
133 views

Rules for Near Rhymes

I seem to be confused about the rules for near rhymes. Specifically are 'slate' and 'pursuit' near rhymes? They seem to me to be so (the vowel sound is different) yet all the references I've checked ...
Walser's user avatar
  • 101
2 votes
2 answers
3k views

Can one write poems that follows a rhyme scheme but no metre?

As a non-English speaker, I wonder if one can write English poems that follow a rhyme scheme but no metre? If so, what is this form called? And can you kindly point out notable poets that practised ...
Waqas Younas's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
51 views

Do words like phase and space rhyme?

Or is there another way to compare them how they sound similar?
ben's user avatar
  • 47
6 votes
4 answers
625 views

Why doesn't "bounce" rhyme with "counts"?

I was surprised to learn, recently, that various online rhyming dictionaries do not consider "bounce" and "counts" to be perfect rhymes. See, for example, here and here. At the same time, when I say ...
Doubt's user avatar
  • 419
0 votes
1 answer
78 views

Is there a word for a word (ex of ‘word’:near rhyme) that has a rhyme with the middle of a word?

For example, I reaLIzed that you are a LIE The caps are the rhyming part
anonymous-u will never know's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
93 views

Spelling or Saying Words Differently to Create a Rhyme

What is the name for wordplay in which a word is spoken or spelled differently to make a rhyme? For example: I'm running this shit you should try tacklin', Lil Wayne in one word immaculin [...
Choylton B. Higginbottom's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
363 views

she sells seashells type of rhyming style

You know how the pairing of words she sells & the word seashells sound similar in rhyme , is there a specific type of technique that has more than one word rhyme with one word?
Dan Hicks's user avatar
50 votes
5 answers
7k views

Have "choir" and "deer" ever rhymed?

It’s that time of year when the dodgy rhymes of Christmas carols abound, but I find the chorus of "The Holly and the Ivy" particularly intriguing. The rising of the sun And the running of ...
Pam's user avatar
  • 7,260
0 votes
1 answer
290 views

Why does orange have a rhyme?

As a child most of us are taught that nothing rhymes with orange. But now grown up I discover that there are rhymes, for example, on RhymeZone, they show that sporange and gorringe are rhymes. (I'm ...
Sweet_Cherry's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
423 views

Is there a name for words rhyming from two different stanzas?

Im analyzing this poem, and I noticed that none of the words rhyme with each other in a stanza, but words rhyme with another word from tge next stanza. I understand rhyme scheme is supposed to be ...
S.Chant's user avatar
  • 21
0 votes
1 answer
152 views

Are "wuzzy" and "was he" homophones?

Can you have multiple-word homophones? If not, what would such pairs of same-sounding multiple words be called? There is the funny/children's rhyming poem Fuzzy Wuzzy: Fuzzy Wuzzy was a bear. ...
StayOnTarget's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
385 views

Is there a specific term for ending a rhyming line with something unexpected?

Please note that I've tried googling variations on this, but usually just end up with "words that rhyme with unexpected" which is obviously not what I'm going for. There's a technique I've seen used ...
John Clifford's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
374 views

Is stress-timed rhythm true?

It is said that English has stress-timed rhythm. Is it true? because it sounds that syllables with stress doesn't necessarily get a beat and make isochrony. If it is true, I would like to hear how you ...
Motoki's user avatar
  • 441
3 votes
1 answer
1k views

What is the name of this rhyme scheme: ABABCCDDC?

What is the name of this rhyme scheme: A B A B C C D D C A list of (other) rhyme schemes can be found here. An example can be found on this page. Sweet Destiny by Jan Turner (stanza 1) Oh ...
Karlo's user avatar
  • 245
2 votes
1 answer
1k views

Rules of metrics rhythm and rhyme in poetry, do they exist in English?

I know there are a lot of rules and guidelines in english, for writing a good essay (especially around S.A.T. season!) No such thing in spanish, though! However, for writing poems Spanish does have a ...
hlecuanda's user avatar
  • 790
7 votes
3 answers
2k views

A pronunciation question of slough

So I see there is another question asked here before about the different pronunciations of -ough but my concern is not quite the same. So I am preparing for my presentation tomorrow on interesting ...
Frankibutter's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
289 views

Did "sublime" and "cherubim" rhyme in the past?

In my choir we are currently practicing some carols, including See amid the the winter's snow, which was written by Edward Caswall (1814–1878). Its six verses and refrain each have two pairs of very ...
Jonatan's user avatar
  • 162
1 vote
3 answers
488 views

An English word rhyming with perfection, meaning happiness, success, enjoyment, etc

The reason why I might have a very low self-esteem has to be the fact that I tried all my life to go for perfection, so I never saw my strengths, I just looked for faults and issues to correct. Other ...
Mehdi Haghgoo's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
363 views

Did noted 17th century poet Katherine Philips make a grammatical error?

Does the last line of the first stanza of Katherine Philips's poem, To Mrs. M. A. at parting have a grammatical error? It's surprising that a renowned poet and translator at that time would use the ...
Ener. Nash's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
226 views

What are the names (/terms) for an anticipated-but-missing rhyme?

Sometimes in songs or poetry we are set-up to expect a rhyming word but instead another word is supplied. An example is the Killers song Mr Brightside: Now they're going to bed. And my stomach is ...
Glen_b's user avatar
  • 522
4 votes
3 answers
11k views

What is it called when poems rhyme the second-last word in two lines?

There's one thing I've seen occasionally in poetry (the only examples that currently spring to mind are from Edgar Allan Poe, but I know I've also seen it elsewhere) where instead of using two ...
aphyer's user avatar
  • 43
1 vote
1 answer
209 views

Is there a term for this kind of wordplay (rhyming slang)? [duplicate]

Swapping the phonemes of often used phrases while keeping them the same size and structure, for example: Washing the Dishes -> Wishing the Dashes / Dashing the Wishes (or even Flushing the Fishes) ...
Ingmar Hupp's user avatar
3 votes
4 answers
1k views

English equivalent of Polish saying "Uncle replaced hatchet with stick"

Consider another nice Polish saying "Zamienił stryjek siekierkę na kijek" that literally means "Uncle replaced hatchet with stick" but I managed to form it into a little rhyme just like in Polish (I ...
Colonder's user avatar
  • 1,093
3 votes
2 answers
2k views

How is it called, when you rhyme two words, one of which is transformed?

Comedian Hannibal Buress once rhymed “Morpheus” with “seashells by the seashorfeus” (see also full text). The latter phrase references a tongue-twister that goes “she sells seashells by the seashore”. ...
Mirzhan Irkegulov's user avatar
-3 votes
1 answer
326 views

Concerning Assonance

Assonance, also known as "slant rhyme," is a repetition of vowel sounds that creates an illusion of rhyming. Wikipedia notes that it's "used in (mainly modern) English poetry." Which leads me to ...
Ricky's user avatar
  • 20.4k
-1 votes
1 answer
170 views

A Vowel Shift Question

Two lines from Byron's Don Juan: 'T is said that Donna Julia's grandmamma Produced her Don more heirs at love than law. This is the coda to an octave, the finalizing couplet, and it's supposed to ...
Ricky's user avatar
  • 20.4k
3 votes
1 answer
215 views

Is there a name for a rhyme scheme where the rhyming words have conflicting/twisted meaning?

I'm trying to analyse the Ballad of Serenity Valley which is the theme song for the tv series Firefly: take my love take my land take me where I cannot stand I don't care I'm still free ...
AncientSwordRage's user avatar