Questions tagged [rhymes]

Questions about words that have the same sound as one another. E.g. 'pique' and 'leek'

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47 views

Shakespeare's dubious rhymes [duplicate]

Background I'm reading A Midsummer Night's Dream, and a lot of the dialogues and monologues are rhymes. But some times, these rhymes aren't rhymes at all. For instance So should the murder'd look, ...
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What term would describe the following poetry elements like rhyme, alliteration, assonance, etc. that relate to the way the word is sounded?

I'm looking for a word that categorizes rhyme, alliteration, assonance, etc. that relate to the way the word is sounded into one group/word. I hear that it could be called "sound devices" ...
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Rules for Near Rhymes

I seem to be confused about the rules for near rhymes. Specifically are 'slate' and 'pursuit' near rhymes? They seem to me to be so (the vowel sound is different) yet all the references I've checked ...
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If a poem is written in iambic tetrameter without using any rhyme scheme, will it be considered to be a formal verse?

I'm a non-native speaker, interested in understanding metrical patterns in English poetry. I know that formal verse refers to a poem written with a strict metre and rhyme scheme. I am also aware ...
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Can one write poems that follows a rhyme scheme but no metre?

As a non-English speaker, I wonder if one can write English poems that follow a rhyme scheme but no metre? If so, what is this form called? And can you kindly point out notable poets that practised ...
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Do words like phase and space rhyme?

Or is there another way to compare them how they sound similar?
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137 views

Why doesn't “bounce” rhyme with “counts”?

I was surprised to learn, recently, that various online rhyming dictionaries do not consider "bounce" and "counts" to be perfect rhymes. See, for example, here and here. At the same time, when I say ...
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Is there a word for a word (ex of ‘word’:near rhyme) that has a rhyme with the middle of a word?

For example, I reaLIzed that you are a LIE The caps are the rhyming part
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Spelling or Saying Words Differently to Create a Rhyme

What is the name for wordplay in which a word is spoken or spelled differently to make a rhyme? For example: I'm running this shit you should try tacklin', Lil Wayne in one word immaculin [...
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3answers
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she sells seashells type of rhyming style

You know how the pairing of words she sells & the word seashells sound similar in rhyme , is there a specific type of technique that has more than one word rhyme with one word?
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Have “choir” and “deer” ever rhymed?

It’s that time of year when the dodgy rhymes of Christmas carols abound, but I find the chorus of "The Holly and the Ivy" particularly intriguing. The rising of the sun And the running of ...
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147 views

Why does orange have a rhyme?

As a child most of us are taught that nothing rhymes with orange. But now grown up I discover that there are rhymes, for example, on RhymeZone, they show that sporange and gorringe are rhymes. (I'm ...
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1answer
130 views

Is there a name for words rhyming from two different stanzas?

Im analyzing this poem, and I noticed that none of the words rhyme with each other in a stanza, but words rhyme with another word from tge next stanza. I understand rhyme scheme is supposed to be ...
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1answer
97 views

Are “wuzzy” and “was he” homophones?

Can you have multiple-word homophones? If not, what would such pairs of same-sounding multiple words be called? There is the funny/children's rhyming poem Fuzzy Wuzzy: Fuzzy Wuzzy was a bear. ...
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284 views

Is there a specific term for ending a rhyming line with something unexpected?

Please note that I've tried googling variations on this, but usually just end up with "words that rhyme with unexpected" which is obviously not what I'm going for. There's a technique I've seen used ...
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1answer
311 views

Is stress-timed rhythm true?

It is said that English has stress-timed rhythm. Is it true? because it sounds that syllables with stress doesn't necessarily get a beat and make isochrony. If it is true, I would like to hear how you ...
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What is the name of this rhyme scheme: ABABCCDDC?

What is the name of this rhyme scheme: A B A B C C D D C A list of (other) rhyme schemes can be found here. An example can be found on this page. Sweet Destiny by Jan Turner (stanza 1) Oh ...
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1answer
986 views

Rules of metrics rhythm and rhyme in poetry, do they exist in English?

I know there are a lot of rules and guidelines in english, for writing a good essay (especially around S.A.T. season!) No such thing in spanish, though! However, for writing poems Spanish does have a ...
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A pronunciation question of slough

So I see there is another question asked here before about the different pronunciations of -ough but my concern is not quite the same. So I am preparing for my presentation tomorrow on interesting ...
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Did “sublime” and “cherubim” rhyme in the past?

In my choir we are currently practicing some carols, including See amid the the winter's snow, which was written by Edward Caswall (1814–1878). Its six verses and refrain each have two pairs of very ...
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456 views

An English word rhyming with perfection, meaning happiness, success, enjoyment, etc

The reason why I might have a very low self-esteem has to be the fact that I tried all my life to go for perfection, so I never saw my strengths, I just looked for faults and issues to correct. Other ...
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336 views

Did noted 17th century poet Katherine Philips make a grammatical error?

Does the last line of the first stanza of Katherine Philips's poem, To Mrs. M. A. at parting have a grammatical error? It's surprising that a renowned poet and translator at that time would use the ...
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What is it called when poems rhyme the second-last word in two lines?

There's one thing I've seen occasionally in poetry (the only examples that currently spring to mind are from Edgar Allan Poe, but I know I've also seen it elsewhere) where instead of using two ...
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1answer
176 views

Is there a term for this kind of wordplay (rhyming slang)? [duplicate]

Swapping the phonemes of often used phrases while keeping them the same size and structure, for example: Washing the Dishes -> Wishing the Dashes / Dashing the Wishes (or even Flushing the Fishes) ...
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372 views

English equivalent of Polish saying “Uncle replaced hatchet with stick”

Consider another nice Polish saying "Zamienił stryjek siekierkę na kijek" that literally means "Uncle replaced hatchet with stick" but I managed to form it into a little rhyme just like in Polish (I ...
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How is it called, when you rhyme two words, one of which is transformed?

Comedian Hannibal Buress once rhymed “Morpheus” with “seashells by the seashorfeus” (see also full text). The latter phrase references a tongue-twister that goes “she sells seashells by the seashore”. ...
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Concerning Assonance

Assonance, also known as "slant rhyme," is a repetition of vowel sounds that creates an illusion of rhyming. Wikipedia notes that it's "used in (mainly modern) English poetry." Which leads me to ...
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A Vowel Shift Question

Two lines from Byron's Don Juan: 'T is said that Donna Julia's grandmamma Produced her Don more heirs at love than law. This is the coda to an octave, the finalizing couplet, and it's supposed to ...
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Is there a name for a rhyme scheme where the rhyming words have conflicting/twisted meaning?

I'm trying to analyse the Ballad of Serenity Valley which is the theme song for the tv series Firefly: take my love take my land take me where I cannot stand I don't care I'm still free ...
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970 views

Is there an English translation of Dante's “Divine Comedy” that mirrors the original's meter?

I know it would be extremely difficult to write anything in English using the Terza Rima and following the same rhyme pattern as feminine rhymes (the ones in which the penultimate syllable is stressed)...
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Childhood, English(England) rhymes are so disappointing,why? [closed]

When I was a kid, I was taught these poems: Georgie porgie Humpty Dumpty I know Humpty Dumpty was actually a canon, but still it was taught as Egg twins. So only take it on context of rhyme. Piggy ...
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Why don't “monkey” and “donkey” rhyme?

How come the words monkey /ˈmʌŋki/ and donkey /ˈdɒŋki, ˈdɔŋki/ don't rhyme? What is their derivation? Or perhaps they do rhyme, depending on where one is from.
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377 views

Term for when a rhyming word is unspoken? [duplicate]

I was watching a cartoon and part way through a song came on, and it had these two stanzas: Why do you have to look up to her Aside from in a literal sense? Don't you know that a power that big ...
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What is “irregular rhyme?”

In my search for the definition for the poetry term "doggerel," which I still do not understand, I came across the term "irregular rhyme." Can someone explain the definition of these terms, and how ...
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Does any word rhyme with 'wolf'?

I would like to know if there are rhyming words (perfect, identical or holorhymes) for the word wolf. Having searched online only for a short while, I believe there might be a word lurking about. Gulf ...
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1answer
794 views

Rhyme that matches the entire last syllable

I'm looking at a phenomenon in certain Hebrew poetry whereby the rhyming words have the entire final syllable (CVC) matching, instead of just the end of the final syllable (-VC). Using English ...
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Why is it called a 'feminine rhyme'?

While researching for the rhyme scheme used by hip-hop artists (Hail Eminem!), I found this wikipedia article: A feminine rhyme is a rhyme that matches two or more syllables, usually at the end of ...
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2answers
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In what parts of the world do “again” and “rain” rhyme?

I sometimes read rhyming poetry where "again" and "rain" are clearly meant to rhyme. However in my accent they don't rhyme at all. I am now wondering in which accents they do rhyme.
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Rhymes for purple, orange, and silver [closed]

Are there any rhymes for the words purple, orange and silver? One of the apps on my phone says that nothing in the English dictionary rhymes with these words, and I'd like to know if this is really ...
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What do you call “rhymes” which are spelt but not sounded the same way?

Here is an example from T. S. Eliot: And even the Abstract Entities Circumambulate her charm; But our lot crawls between dry ribs To keep our metaphysics warm. I expect most people ...
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In what sort of rhyme do matching consonants precede last stressed vowels?

Is there a term for the sort of rhyme or near-rhyme that subsists between such words as repose and propose? For these seem to me less truly to rhyme than, say, vision and decision. In the latter pair, ...
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sink and sing…not rhyming but what is it called for rhyming the end of two words

What is the definition of reverse rhyming of words where the last few letters of two words are different rather than the beginning letters of two rhyming words. For example: cow, cop, coy, cot, con. ...
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Was the pronunciation of “symmetry” different in the past?

First published in Songs of Experience in 1794, the first stanza of the poem “The Tyger” by William Blake is: Tyger! Tyger! burning bright In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye ...
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Is there a word that means “almost rhymes”?

Sometimes you'll see in poetry or song lyrics, that words don't exactly rhyme, but they almost rhyme. I thought I remembered a high school English teacher once telling our long ago English class that ...
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Word for “extinct”, “eradicated” that sounds like “reserved” [closed]

In the Czech language, there's a word play with copyright notice. We say "vyhrazena" for "reserved" (as of rights) and "vyhlazena" as for eradicated (eg. Indians). I used that pun on my mini site ...
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What kind of rhyme is “pan” and “screen”?

I know there're various types of rhyme in English, such as slant rhyme. There're also things called assonance and consonance. I plan to rhyme "pan" with "screen". Essentially two monosyllabic words ...
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“Made a rhyme without effort” in English from Spanish “Hice verso sin esfuerzo”

In Spanish we can say "Hice verso sin esfuerzo", which means something along the lines of "I made a rhyme without effort", whilst rhyming. What would be an English equivalent of this phrase? I've ...
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A way to describe/categorize music that would rhyme/alliterate with each day of the week [closed]

Good day, apologies for the rather confusing title. My friends and I came up with an idea and started a music appreciation day for each day of the week. The idea is that each day has an assigned genre ...
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3answers
11k views

Does “then before, now once more” mean anything?

Does the phrase then before, now once more have any meaning in English? Or does it exist just because it rhymes so nicely? Or does it exist at all? Likewise, what about that time then, once again?
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A one line rhyme? [closed]

The wiki defines a rhyme as: ...A rhyme is a repetition of similar sounds in two or more words, most often at the end of lines in poems and songs... But if I have just 2 words in a statement that ...