Questions tagged [rhoticity]

Questions related to rhotic and non-rhotic accents.

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Why isn't the vowel in the words "warm" and "war" (in American English) pronounced like the one in the word "talk" (American English)?

Right. What is the actual reason?
Niklas's user avatar
  • 21
5 votes
4 answers
1k views

Pronunciation of word-initial syllabic R in American English

E.g., what is the right pronunciation of the word earn -- [ɹ̩n] (syllabic R) or [ʔəɹn] (glottal stop + schwa + R)? EDIT: Is the word-initial (or more precisely "utterance-initial") syllabic ...
Jiri Vaclavik's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
20 views

Anyone else with this place of articulation of their rhotic sound? [duplicate]

As my question implies, I have an unusual manner of articulation for my rhotic sound, and I wonder if anyone else shares it: my rhotic sound is formed by bringing my bottom lip up so that my top teeth ...
Kyle Colbourne's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
215 views

Flapped r after th in English?

I have heard a few English speakers — native — say the word “three” with what sounds like a flapped r. This might include other words that begin with “thr”, but I can’t remember. It’s just been ...
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0 votes
2 answers
145 views

Is the /jʊɹ/ phoneme being streamlined to /jɚ/ in General American?

The following words have the UR and URE graphemes representing the /jʊɹ/ phoneme. uranium security curious Europe fury mural cure/pure/demure failure tenure figure But for many of the above words, ...
kanamekun's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
800 views

Pronunciation of “tour”

Is the following pronunciation of the word “tour” attested in any common dialect of British English? [tɔ˞] This is approximately how I, a native British English speaker, pronounce it. However, it’s ...
TheProseMix's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
102 views

Is linking R to a vowel in British English an intentional effort or a natural occurrence?

If I am not wrong, the linkage between words happens naturally when you try to pronounce the words quickly. Unlike American English, where the ending R is always clearly pronounced, British ...
FindingNemo's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
66 views

Monosyllabic triphthongs with R are distinguished from sequences with disyllabic realizations

In British Received Pronunciation, and most other non-rhotic (r-dropping) varieties of English, monosyllabic triphthongs with R are optionally distinguished from sequences with disyllabic realizations:...
GJC's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
406 views

Why are "er”, "ar” and "or" often listed as R-colored vowels but "air”, "ear" and "oor/ure" are not? Are they vowels or vowel+consonant?

NOTE: I speak a rhotic variety of English. I am struggling with how to explain r-coloured vowels/vocalic R to teachers during a presentation on the phonemes of English. Many grapheme-phoneme lists ...
Colleen's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
203 views

Do non-rhotic (British) English speakers often insert a silent "r" when respelling certain words?

This question on SF&F Stack Exchange asked how a particular name ("Chasch", made up by the author) from a novel would be pronounced. An answer to the question referenced an audiobook of ...
Spencer's user avatar
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2 votes
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General American: very as / ˈvɛɹi / or / ˈveɹi /, more as / ˈmɔɹ / or / ˈmoɹ /, and chair as / t͡ʃɛəɹ / or / t͡ʃeəɹ / [duplicate]

I read this comment on Youtube. is it possible that the sound / ɹ / tends to close the vowels that precede it? For example, at least to me, [very] / ˈvɛɹi / sounds more like / ˈveɹi /, [more] / ˈmɔɹ /...
MagTun's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
326 views

I pronounce initial R's with my upper teeth on the very bottom of my inside lower lip. Not rhotic. What's the IPA for this?

The Wikipedia page "Pronunciation of English /r/" doesn't mention an option for pronouncing R where the upper teeth are really, really at the bottom of the inside lower lip, practically ...
peisander's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
235 views

What did post-vocalic r sound like in the UK before it died out?

As far as I understand it most UK dialects became non-rhotic at some point in the 19th century - but was the r sound previously heard in words like park similar to today's American pronunciation, or ...
rchivers's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
139 views

How do you pronounce, "pleurisy"?

According to Wiktionary, pleurisy is pronounced one of two ways: a) /ˈplʊəɹɪsi/ b) /ˈpljʊəɹɪsi/ I don't hear the /j/ sound when I say the word (in General American) - I hear it like this: https://www....
kanamekun's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
246 views

Does the word "pirate" use the /aɪɚ/ phoneme, or the /aɪɹ/ phoneme?

I'm making a list of all of the graphemes can be used to make the phoneme /aɪɚ/ in General American. -ire as in fire, wire, desire, sapphire, etc. -yre as in lyre, pyre, tyre, etc. I have questions ...
kanamekun's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
137 views

What type of accent does this person have?

My friend has lived in Kenya for the first 8 years of his life and the United States for 2 & 1/2 years. He's been in Ireland since 2009. He is auditioning for a voiceover job on the radio and they ...
Eric Hernandez's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
931 views

Is there any difference between a syllabic R /ɹ̩/ and r-colored vowel /ɚ/?

So I have seen that both of them can form a syllable on their own but I don't know the difference between them. /ɹ̩/ it is a syllabic R and can form a syllable on its own as in [ˈdɔːɾɹ̩] ("...
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3 votes
1 answer
98 views

rhotic sound in received pronunciation?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcaWkR4ydeY Hi, This is a British pronunciation according to the title. I can hear a rhotic /ɝ/ in the second syllable, however. In the pronunciation of this word, ...
zzzgoo's user avatar
  • 273
3 votes
3 answers
539 views

Where in Ireland, if anywhere, at the time of James Joyce, would "hoe" and "whore" sound similar enough to pun?

Where in Ireland, if anywhere, at the time of James Joyce (1882 – 1941), would "hoe" and "whore" sound similar enough to pun? This question pertains to Does Joyce, in Finnegans Wake or Ulysses, ...
fundagain's user avatar
  • 615
13 votes
2 answers
4k views

Why is Indian English usually rhotic?

It seems that speakers of Indian English generally speak with a rhotic accent, pronouncing an [r] in all cases where spelled, whereas a speaker of British English would leave it off in postvocalic ...
mic's user avatar
  • 576
5 votes
1 answer
797 views

Am I semi-rhotic?

I am back with another question about pronunciation. I noticed that I pronounce the "r" sound inconsistently when it follows a vowel. For example, in some words I do not sound it, but in others I do. ...
user69503's user avatar
  • 161
6 votes
2 answers
1k views

Can most native English speakers pronounce the alveolar trill? (The R in its most emphatic version)

Usually, in English, the R letter is pronounced either as alveolar approximant or retroflex approximant. The alveolar trill, while not incorrect is used only in a few dialects or, rarely, in emphatic ...
gaazkam's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
2k views

Is there a name for this articulate, hyper-enunciated, "upper class" American English accent?

In the television show Frasier, the protagonist's brother, Niles Crane, is a haughty, snobby, obsessive-compulsive psychiatrist who frequently obsesses about knowing the right people and climbing the ...
actinidia's user avatar
  • 200
1 vote
1 answer
508 views

I have a Linking r question

I know that in non-rhotic versions of English the /r/ sound is not pronounced - unless the next word begins with a a vowel. So my question is, If a British person says "How are you?" Would "are" ...
James's user avatar
  • 367
2 votes
1 answer
2k views

Why don't people understand me when I speak English with a non-rhotic accent?

My name is Arnau and I'm from Barcelona. Over the last few years, I've been exposed to the British culture a lot (I have British friends, I've been living in Brighton for a while, I watch British TV ...
Arnau's user avatar
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6 votes
3 answers
675 views

Received Pronunciation and ambiguity (users vs uses)

Let us consider the following two sentences: These users of our app allowed us to find a few new uses for it. and These uses of our app allowed us to find a few new users for it. Both of them ...
Alexander Rodin's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
651 views

Are R-colored diphthongs phonemes or not?

There are some sounds called the "R-colored diphthong" in English, such as [or] sound in "court" or the [ir] sound in "clear". My question is simple: are these R-colored diphthongs regarded as ...
Motoki's user avatar
  • 421
4 votes
1 answer
303 views

Pronunciation of words that end with two syllabic R's

There are a few words in English that end with two adjacent syllabic R's (in theory). For example, let's take the word deliverer. As a non-native speaker, I find it very hard to pronounce those two ...
Jiri Vaclavik's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
286 views

Pronunciation of word "considered"

I have learned in school that letter 'r' is not sounded in the word 'considered', here's an example. But I have been watching the 'How I met your mother' series, and Ted have pronounced that with ...
Vladimir's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
9k views

Did the modern British accent originate from a speech impediment? [closed]

I have heard a theory that the modern British pronunciation (as compared, for example, to American pronunciation) started when somebody in the monarchy had a speech impediment (perhaps rhotacism) and, ...
feetwet's user avatar
  • 1,420
8 votes
1 answer
4k views

Pronunciation of Korea and Career

Are the pronunciations of Korea and Career identical?
Thomas Yang's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
643 views

Should British r be spoken out in liaison?

For example, the r in "better" is not pronounced in British English. How about the "r" in "a better idea"?
George's user avatar
  • 145
3 votes
4 answers
6k views

How to pronounce "miracle"?

I ask this because I recently had a debate with my family about how to pronounce this word, miracle. They said it was pronounced with the "mir" in miracle the same way "mir" is in mirror. (/ˈmɪɹəkəl/)....
tvanc's user avatar
  • 151
10 votes
1 answer
28k views

Difference between IPA ɚ, ɹ, and ɝ

Wanting to be more Californian and trying to correct my accent, I'm looking at the sound for mother, in the North America column. What is the difference between IPA symbols for ɚ, ɹ, and ɝ. (ɝ is not ...
huggie's user avatar
  • 221
12 votes
2 answers
90k views

Where does the intrusive R come from in “warsh”?

My grandmother, who grew up in western Pennsylvania, pronounced wash and Washington with an intrusive R: “warsh” and “Warshington.” Where does the intrusive R come from in that dialect? It doesn’t ...
Bradd Szonye's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
2k views

Pronouncing th after r in Standard American English: /ɹð/

I natively speak Flemish (Dutch). We trill the R. I just had a 7-lesson course (over video chat with an American lady) to improve my accent towards Standard American English. According to the test I ...
Sygmoral's user avatar
  • 192
20 votes
3 answers
4k views

Non-rhotic dialects and intrusive r

I am from New England (northeastern US) and it's my understanding that we have a non-rhotic dialect in this region, which is unusual compared to the rest of the US. It is common to drop the final r ...
Kit Z. Fox's user avatar
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5 votes
3 answers
4k views

Retroflex approximants in AE dialects

While looking up the best way to describe the aboriginal pronunciation of Uluru (/uluɻu/), I stumbled across retroflex approximants. The linked Wikipedia page states: The retroflex approximant ...
coleopterist's user avatar
  • 31.1k
6 votes
1 answer
623 views

Who says /ˈjumə/ for "humor"?

What dialect(s) pronounce humor voiced initially and non-rhotic finally (i.e., with both those features in the same dialect: the word would be pronounced something like /ˈjumə/)?
msh210's user avatar
  • 3,955
6 votes
1 answer
7k views

What is the origin of "uh", "um", "erm" and "er"?

This question may be a better fit on linguistics.SE, but it pertains specifically to English fillers. Also, the question may have a more straightforward answer than what I'm expecting. TL;DR: Are ...
Zairja's user avatar
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32 votes
6 answers
52k views

How many syllables are in the word 'hour'?

Does the word 'hour' have 1 or 2 syllables?
Matthew Vines's user avatar
2 votes
4 answers
2k views

How to pronounce "linearly"?

As the title states, how do I pronounce the word "Linearly"? I did some Google searching on this but I was not able to find any guidance.
void.pointer's user avatar
13 votes
8 answers
4k views

Looking for a minimal triple with /ɑ, ɒ, ɔ/

I am looking for a minimal triple for a particular set of phonemes. By minimal triple, I mean three actual English words that differ in one and only one phoneme between them. Examples therefore ...
tchrist's user avatar
  • 135k
10 votes
2 answers
1k views

“Non-rhotic” is to R-droppers as “non-?????” is to L-droppers

Certain speakers of English have a tendency to “drop” L’s that occur after a vowel but before another consonant, as in balm, calm, golf, gulf, palm, wolf, and many more. Often these aren’t ...
tchrist's user avatar
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10 votes
4 answers
7k views

Difference in [ə] pronunciation at the end of a word in British and American English

I grew up speaking American English (San Diego to be specific). When I hear someone who speaks British English say a word that ends in [ə], like banana, I hear a weak but distinct 'r' sound attached ...
just.another.programmer's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
26k views

Are there any rules as to why the letter 'r' is silent in some words?

How do I know when to keep r silent in pronunciation? Examples: Not silent cry free friend Silent German iron learn
Aravind00Kumar's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
3k views

Should pronunciation of the r in "heart" be the same as r in "rabbit", in UK English?

My 5 yr old daughter was given a task by her teacher to "find as many things as she can that have the sound r" with examples of rabbit, barrow, and ruler (all r's were underlined in the 3 words). ...
Highly Irregular's user avatar
6 votes
4 answers
3k views

Is there a word for "not pronouncing any r's"?

Some find it difficult to form an "r" sound, and some are able to, but just don't. I'm looking for a word which means "not pronouncing r's", without implying inability to pronounce them, though that ...
Daniel's user avatar
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25 votes
6 answers
15k views

“Tortoise” and “taught us”

I’m reading Alice in Wonderland, and found the following dialogue: “The master was an old Turtle — we used to call him Tortoise—” “Why did you call him Tortoise, if he wasn’t one?” Alice asked. “We ...
hazzik's user avatar
  • 744
16 votes
4 answers
18k views

Pronunciation of "er" in "farmer" vs. "earth"

I'm confused about the difference in pronouncing "er" in words such as "farmer" and "earth". I hear them the same, but they have different phonetic symbols. Is there any difference in pronouncing "er" ...
NL500's user avatar
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