Skip to main content

Questions tagged [religion]

For questions about English terminology that relates to religious thought in general or to a specific religion.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
13 votes
5 answers
2k views

Can the word "christen" be used in an entirely non-religious context to describe the naming of something like a building?

Is it appropriate (and culturally sensitive) to use the term christen in a sentence such as: The building was christened the Stone Center in memory of Dr. Stone, whose research made it possible. ...
vy32's user avatar
  • 428
0 votes
4 answers
96 views

What is a word meaning a formal denouncement from the Pope?

As above, I'm looking for a word meaning something similar a formal denouncement from the Pope (or Church)?
guest's user avatar
  • 71
-1 votes
2 answers
969 views

What is an appropriate and meaningful substitute to "Thank God" (from an agnostic perspective)? [duplicate]

Raised as a "Mormon" I was taught that saying "Thank God" is blasphemy and sacrilegious. As an agnostic adult, I struggle to replace the phrase w/ something that honestly ...
Kristie Brown's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
493 views

Does "saying grace" necessarily have Christian connotations? Or can colloquial usage include different meanings?

Initially, I thought that the phrase "saying grace" was only used in English to mean when Christians say a prayer before eating. Some research has made me question whether "saying grace&...
Shaymin Gratitude's user avatar
25 votes
1 answer
2k views

Can "né" or "née" be used to refer to a religious's secular name?

Is "né" (masculine) or "née" (feminine) ever used to refer to the secular name of a religious (i.e., monk or nun)? For example: Sr. Mary Dominic (née Jill Smith) or Br. Raphael ...
Geremia's user avatar
  • 722
0 votes
1 answer
383 views

Should "God" be capitalized in this instance? [duplicate]

I notice quite a few writers (mainly Christian writers), always capitalizing the word God, even in sentences where, to me, it doesn't make grammatical sense. For example: "God is a good God";...
QueenieLou's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
809 views

Has the word "believer" always had the meaning of someone who believes in God or has it picked up that meaning somewhere along the line?

Has the word believer always had the meaning of believing in God or has it picked up that meaning somewhere along the line ? When I say "I am a believer", without further context, does it ...
Qiulang 邱朗's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
197 views

Are ‘Haggers Commagers’ and ‘Jessica Christ’ camp High Church Anglican slang/cant?

In an episode of QI (series G, episode ‘Girls and Boys’), Stephen Fry says that there is a camp High Church (Anglican) cant/language game (like Pig Latin), where Holy Communion becomes ‘Haggers ...
curiousqiwatcher's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
380 views

A good term for "Dead" God [closed]

I am doing some world building for my game, but it's not really a world building question. I wouldn't have the problem with this term in my native language, it's strictly about the limits of my ...
gruszczy's user avatar
  • 299
0 votes
2 answers
452 views

Collective Noun for Religious Implements

Is there a general term to describe the instruments used in Christian rituals like the mass? I am referring to cruets to hold the bread and wine, the paten, ciborium, chalice and the like.
user26732's user avatar
  • 404
3 votes
3 answers
128 views

Is there a word for the human tendency to be religious?

I am looking for a word that captures the Voltaire quote “If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent him.” There is the id, ego, and superego from Freud to describe the three tendencies in ...
OrigamiEye's user avatar
3 votes
4 answers
230 views

What is a word for adapting a god into a demi-god or saint?

There are words that describe elevating a person into the divine: apotheosis, divinization, and deification as nouns, and deify as a verb. In some religions, it is possible for a human to undergo ...
TaliesinMerlin's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
90 views

Is the book title "God versus gods" grammatically incorrect?

I wrote a book entitled God versus Gods which depicts the struggle between the One God of Jewish Monotheism and the multiplicity of gods in the pagan/polytheistic ancient world. The prevailing rule in ...
Reb Chaim HaQoton's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

Qur'anic Studies: Meaning of the word "tooth" [closed]

In the meantime, Luxenberg has made two proposals that relate to the question of how the text was first written. First, he argues that the “Ur-Qur’an” sometimes used a single “tooth” as mater ...
Ahmed Al-Sherb's user avatar
9 votes
3 answers
3k views

What does "hell's bells" refer to?

The expression "hell's bells" conveys anger, irritation, or surprise, according to CED, MW etc, but they do not explain the origin. Were there bells in hell? What is this in reference to?
spraff's user avatar
  • 583
2 votes
2 answers
2k views

What is the meaning of the "narrow" road/path metaphor?

All my life, I've regularly heard phrases such as: Walk on the narrow road, never steering off into Hell! Don't listen to the Devil trying to lure you into his dark path! This, to me, metaphorically ...
Priscilla Bess's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
88 views

Does this essay question have a grammar error?

Thank you for taking the time to answer this question. "Discuss the concept of religious belief social scientific perspectives addressing issues of societal change." Does this sentence make ...
Why's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
4 answers
150 views

Theism has words for I don't know, believe, or care. What about I have NO NEED for theism/gods? [closed]

Along the lines of Apatheist (I don't care), Atheist (I don't believe), Agnostic (I don't know)... Is there a neat little word expressing "I have no need for a god"?
misterjohn john's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
853 views

Sodomy, but no "Gomorry"? [closed]

Sodom and Gomorrah are two cities in the Abrahamic religions that were destroyed by brimstone and fire for their sins. Even though English speakers use both cities historically as metaphors for sin ...
Chris Duncan's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
101 views

Should I use [sic] when quoting the KJV 1611?

I am currently working on a project for my Grade 12 religion class, and it requires (surprise, surprise) Biblical quotations. I have decided to use the 1611 KJV Bible and quote verses with very ...
Micah Windsor's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
52 views

Meaning of 'staging' in 'the Qur'an's staging, penetrating and eclipsing of Biblical tradition'

What's the meaning of the word staging in the following context? "The Qurʾān’s Staging, Penetrating and Eclipsing of Biblical Tradition" It's the address of a study conducted by Angelika Neuwirth.
Ahmed Al-Sherb's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
48 views

What does “occasion of sin” mean?

I am watching Grace and Frankie, S2:E9 in which Robert and John are talking to each other at a park. John asks him the reason for coming out the closet so late, to which Robert replies that he fell in ...
Noeshel 's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
2k views

Spongy green glass found on graves

In my childhood, there was a spongy (ie full of bubbles) glass of a pale-green shade which was placed covering the stone-bounded graves in more than one of the church grounds near me, is there a name ...
Jiminy Cricket.'s user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
943 views

A word for non-Christian equivalent of "chapel"? [closed]

Specifically, the part of a temple in which the equivalent of an altar is situated, also where the religious services are performed. I need this word for a fantasy novel I'm writing in which no real-...
user289661's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
211 views

Religious names in index. How do you order and present? [closed]

I have a book that discusses Catholicism. I would like to know if there are any established resources that advise on listing religious names in indexes, where the norm is reversal of surnames and ...
sketchyTech's user avatar
9 votes
5 answers
936 views

Word for the religious equivalent of 'demonym'

A demonym is a noun used to denote the natives or inhabitants of a particular country, state, city, etc. For example, Europeans are from Europe; the word "Europeans" is the demonym of "Europe". ...
Mike S's user avatar
  • 331
0 votes
2 answers
5k views

When is it appropriate to send Seasons Greetings? [closed]

During what time of the year is it appropriate to close semi-formal written conversation with "Season's Greetings"? Obviously sometime around December 25th, but how much in advance and how much past ...
hielsnoppe's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
84 views

3 in 1 is a Trinity. What is 2 in 1, 4 in 1, 5 in 1, N in 1? [duplicate]

Background The use of the word "Trinity" occurs frequently in Catholicism when referring to God's nature, 3 persons in 1 God. What words would describe a being that is 2 persons, 4 persons, 5 ...
isakbob's user avatar
  • 113
3 votes
2 answers
2k views

What is the most appropriate word to describe the phenomenon of many church bells ringing concurrently?

Usually in celebration of a wedding or Christmas morning? Although I know I've read a word that describes this event exactly, I can't recall where or when. I've polled some pals and gotten "jubilee ...
CDC's user avatar
  • 33
0 votes
1 answer
3k views

What does it mean if someone says they are "blessed"? [closed]

If Person X says that they're "blessed", does this have to imply that they believe they've received a blessing from some higher power? Or could it just mean they feel "fortunate" or even just happy ...
user avatar
28 votes
6 answers
16k views

Why is it "came back from the dead" and not "came back from the death"?

Many times now, I've heard native English speakers (from the USA and Canada) say "he came back from the dead" instead of "from the death" when they mean resurrection. Dead is not a noun, so I don't ...
None's user avatar
  • 425
2 votes
2 answers
78 views

Is it acceptable to call teachings such as "How to behave as a Muslim" a science? If not, what should we call them in English?

In the Muslim world, it is very popular to call the teachings of the religion a science. As we all know, the God and resurrection cannot be proven or rejected in a lab or through scientific methods. ...
محسن رحمانی's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
154 views

What are the etymological origins of the names Muhammad, Jesus and Buddha? [closed]

Muhammad, Jesus and Buddha are names today strongly connected with the religions these guys founded. So obviously they were not derived from their respective religions. So what did these names signify ...
LocalFluff's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
4k views

Which is correct: "eucharistic" or "Eucharistic"? Or is there no hard rule? [closed]

Recently I have been writing a question at https://christianity.stackexchange.com. I have noticed that browser underlines word "eucharistic". As I am neither English nor catholic, I do not know any ...
abukaj's user avatar
  • 121
3 votes
3 answers
1k views

The belief that a god is human-like

What is the word that means someone who believes a deity has a recognizable human form and personality? Usually, these personality traits are virtuous but they can also mimic man's weaknesses and ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 91.9k
0 votes
0 answers
92 views

How do I write (not cite) Bible verses in MLA format?

For in-text MLA citations of the Bible, everything I've seen says to write the following: Saint John tells us that "God so loved the world that he sent his only-begotten Son" (Revised Standard ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
75 views

Word order in the Hail Mary prayer

Part of the Hail Mary reads Blessed art thou among women, And blessed is the fruit of thy womb, etc. I have some intuitive sense that putting the adjective first accomplishes something subtle but ...
aparente001's user avatar
  • 21.6k
3 votes
1 answer
256 views

Word that refers to efforts by people of all religions to develop closer relationships and better understandings

I am looking for a word like ecumenical: Ecumenism refers to efforts by Christians of different Church traditions to develop closer relationships and better understandings. Wikipedia What I want ...
Truth Reigns's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
67 views

Specific adjective to qualify a religion

I am looking for a word to describe a religion which is flexible or liberal enough to accept a variety of folk beliefs, magical practices, other demons etc. The author (translator) of the text which ...
Marek's user avatar
  • 11
2 votes
1 answer
258 views

Why and how did "Shinto shrine" largely replace "Shinto temple"?

According to ngrams, "Shinto shrine" and "Shinto temple" were roughly equal in popularity until the 1930s, but nowadays, "Shinto shrine" is roughly 9 or 10 times more common than "Shinto temple", ...
Golden Cuy's user avatar
  • 18.2k
11 votes
7 answers
1k views

Better alternative for Mythology

On Hinduism Stackexchange, we have mythology a most popular tag. Since the word can have two different meanings i.e somewhat ambiguous nature, users often raise discussion on meta to rename or remove ...
Pandya's user avatar
  • 211
1 vote
2 answers
628 views

"Polishing Saint-in-the-Box"?

I'm reading St. Lucy's School for Girls Raised by Wolves by Karen Russell. I haven't been able to figure out exactly what "Saint-in-the-Box" means (I googled it) in the following: 'Does Mirabella ...
aparente001's user avatar
  • 21.6k
0 votes
1 answer
392 views

Query about C.E./A.D. and B.C./B.C.E

I know the difference between A.D./B.C. and C.E./B.C.E. in terms of the religious accuracy i.e. that Christ was probably born in 4 B.C., what I don't understand is how this affects the C.E./B.C.E. ...
Haz's user avatar
  • 3
2 votes
2 answers
8k views

What does 'lift up' mean in a religious context?

I came across this tweet from Sen Rob Portman from Ohio, referring to the death of Otto Warmbier, His passing today is a loss for Ohio and for all of us. Jane and I are lifting up the Warmbier ...
Shun's user avatar
  • 765
1 vote
3 answers
248 views

Equivalent Metonymy of "The Crown" for the Pope and Papacy

I'm writing about the English Reformation-era split allegiance to the king and pope, and I want to write a sentence comparing allegiance to "The Crown" to the equivalent metonym for the papacy. I ...
jaxreiff's user avatar
  • 121
12 votes
7 answers
2k views

Can you use the word atheistic to describe a lack of belief towards one specific religion?

I don't believe in any deities. Therefore I am an atheist. But if I were to just express that I don't believe in say Zeus, would it be correct to say "I am atheistic towards Zeus"? Take a person who ...
Kantura's user avatar
  • 621
1 vote
3 answers
86 views

Word for applying heavenly arguments to terrestrial issues

Is there a word for the process of applying heavenly-derived arguments to terrestrial issues? For example, "John Doe argues against abortion because his Catholic faith says it's wrong. John's ...
techSultan's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
636 views

What does "cease to be never" means?

The line is from a translation of Bhagavad Gita by Sir Edwin Arnold: Never the spirit was born; the spirit shall cease to be never; Never was time it was not; End and Beginnings are dreams! .......
Wei Shan Ng's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
201 views

Word for the perception that the majority of people thinks about something the same way they do

So for example, supposing that I believed in God then because of my own belief I would assume that most people everywhere necessarily also believe in God. Kind of bias in the thought because of one’s ...
liwevire's user avatar
  • 163
1 vote
1 answer
399 views

Generic word for religious establishment

I need a word to describe any community that is religious. For example, a Church Group or Temple Youth Group. Would Religous Institution be correct? Edit: As single word would probably be impossible, ...
Nate D's user avatar
  • 111