Questions tagged [relative-clauses]

Relative clauses are clauses starting with the relative pronouns who*, that, which, whose, where, when. They are most often used to define or identify the noun that precedes them.

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Using 'place that' instead of 'place where'

Practical English Usage, Fourth Edition (Fully Revised International Edition), by Michael Swan has this sentence under subsection 237 relatives: advanced points: We need a place (that) we can stay ...
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Relative clause - situational instances [duplicate]

I was taught “which” can be used to refer to a situation or event in the preceding clause, as well as referring directly to the person or thing immediately in front of “which”. But how do you tell the ...
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Is this natural? "There's somebody wants to see you." [duplicate]

I have learned the following sentence is grammatically correct because it is possible to omit the nominative relative pronoun in a sentence like "there is ...". I'm not sure if it is natural ...
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Nonstandard agreement in relative clauses (usage)

Kimball and Aissen (1971) describe a dialect of English in which the matrix verb may agree with the embedded subject when it is relativized. That is, this dialect admits both (1a), with thinks ...
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Do reduced relative clauses stack? [closed]

I was wondering if you can always get (3-4) from (1-2) or if there is some kind of restriction on this sort of stacking (1) The door closed by the janitor (2) The door expected to be opened by the ...
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Which relative pronoun should I use to describe objects which use the pronoun them? [closed]

There are many active political parties here. Many of them hold great influence. If I were to join both sentences with a preposition and a relative pronoun, would 'which' or 'whom' to describe '...
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Why is "Audiences may contain many 'free riders', not making contributions." incorrect?

[From an SAT practice test] The correct answer is "Audiences may contain many 'free riders', who did not make contributions." I can hear how the second sounds better but can't articulate ...
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Omit relative pronoun while connecting two relative clauses

The value of function f(x)=ax+b is positive when x is positive where a is non-negative real number and where b is positive integer. Is there any difference as I omit the second "where" as ...
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A Question About Extra Information Relative Clauses

I was creating Instagram posts, and I noticed that there might have been something wrong with the text. Here it is: ‘Heaven’ is an uncountable noun that refers to a place where good people go after ...
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"of which" with a number – is this grammatically correct? [duplicate]

Consider this sentence; I found 6 coins, 5 of which were rare Is this grammatically correct? I've been using it for years but I recently realised it may not be "correct". I put the term ...
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Can a relative clause introduced by a noun phrase marked by the indefinite article be both non-restrictive and restrictive?

[Example 1] The quirky scientist is shot and killed by a group of Libyan terrorists from whom he stole the plutonium that powers his new design. In the above example, I have used a restrictive ...
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Is this a complex sentence with a relative clause?

I have a sentence here: “I don’t understand why you like birds.” Upon analyzing the sentence structure, there is what appears to be a relative clause: “why you like birds” Is this then a complex ...
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Separating that/which clauses from their referents with prepositional phrases [duplicate]

How acceptable is it to separate a that-clause from its referent with a prepositional phrase? It's a problem I keep running into, and I'm not sure if it's too jarring. How would you rate the ...
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2 answers
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What syntatic role does the noun 'desire' occupy in this infinitive clause?

I know that infinitive clauses can be used as modifiers. Most of the time, I can easily identify their place. See this example: [1] He found a place to sleep. Although it isn't explicitly stated, my ...
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What to do when a relative pronoun seems to be both object and subject? [duplicate]

Consider the following: I congratulate him. He won the race. I congratulate him who won the race. I think these are straight-forward. The object of the main clause becomes the subject of the ...
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What is the term for repeating non-restrictive clauses?

I came across the following quote: Scientists would soon find themselves adrift in a bewildering realm of particles and antiparticles, where things pop in and out of existence in spans of time that ...
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Use of Relative Clauses Without Any Corresponding Noun Clause/Phrase [closed]

Is it correct to use relative clauses that do not modify any noun clauses/phrases? Take this next sentence as an example I will let you retake the test, which is more than reasonable. The relative ...
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Non restrictive relative clase with prepositional noun phrase [duplicate]

In the sentence The partner of an old woman who is residing in the USA will help us it is clear that the person who will help us is the partner. But, I'm not clear whether the person who is residing ...
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Adjective use after nouns: with and without that-clause [closed]

Let us take a look at these adjectives: able, similar, capable, ready, etc. We are free to stick them to the back of any noun thus avoiding using that/who-clause, like in these examples: Presumably, ...
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Is there a name for a 'noun + of which/whom' relative clause? [duplicate]

After the battle, he encountered the soldiers, many of whom had sustained severe injuries. The doctor treated the soldiers' injuries, the worst of which was a missing leg. While writing, I frequently ...
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Is "the hole where the tooth had been" acceptable [closed]

The hole where the tooth had been was now filled with cotton ( a dentist had just extracted the tooth.) I wrote the sentence, but I hesitated using the relative clause, because I suddenly realized it ...
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Can relative adverb "when" also be used to indicate condition?

As far as I know, I can't use the word "If" to make a relation between noun and clause such as *The threshold if X occurs is 40 products at a time. The right form of it would be If X ...
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Is the useage of "that" in this clause correct?

I miss the days that I was trouble-free. I know it would be correct if "that" is replaced by "when," but can "that" also be correct? Also, I have this faint feeling that ...
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Can a relative clause be a compound sentence?

They began to believe that their way of doing business was failing and that their incomes would therefore shortly begin to fall as well. In this sentence, can I remove the second "that" ...
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Can "that" stand after a comma? [duplicate]

Is the underlined "that" used accurately there? I suppose it is a relative clause, based on its meaning and function but this dialogue has been bugging me for a while since all I've learned ...
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Is using gerund with relative pronoun possible? [duplicate]

I have a question. As I remember I can't use the gerund/presentParticiple with the relative pronoun such as "when","who" and so on. But I met one sentence in the dictionary "...
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Right in front of relative clause, what prepositions are frequently used?

I recently learned relative clause with preposition. After some of my "English Deep learning process" so to speak, I got a mere sense that only few prepositions such as "in, on, at"...
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Is there a limit for the number of relative/dependent clauses in a sentence?

I need to correct the following sentence: The article is proving the thesis of shame as a feeling that functions as a bond between people, by presenting a historical analysis of this feeling in three ...
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Martha has two sons, who are still at school, and two, who are at university

Here's a quote from A Student's Introduction to English Grammar: [11]   i  Martha has [two sons who are still at school] and [two who are at university].   In [i] the relative clauses certainly are ...
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Proper formulation of "contribute to" in subordinate sentence

I am writing a text about our project (say Project A), and I want to say that something which I am talking about (the three dots below), was motivated by requirements of project X, which I didn't talk ...
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The use of What as a relative pronoun

I was doing a TOEFL exercise and I stumbled on this particular error-analysis question: In the Indus Valley, what is now Pakistan and western India, most dwellings had drains for waste disposal. The ...
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Can wh- pronouns function as objects in a wh- clause? [closed]

I've recently become interested in relative pronouns and wh- clauses. During my research, I found out about using relative pronouns as objects. For example ('that' is an object of 'my father'): 'This ...
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2 votes
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Shall I put that/when in this sentence? [closed]

For your safety, you will only be given access to lifts and runs that/when your instructor determines you are capable of skiing safely. I was wondering if we put "that", which is a relative ...
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-2 votes
2 answers
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"whose" vs "who/that + possessive" [closed]

A man that his kids want to call 'daddy.' Apparently this sequence is correct. Would it remain so adding on object pronoun, ...call him 'daddy'? However, substituting whose for that + possessive ...
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Present perfect vs simple past in main and relative clause [duplicate]

I would like to ask if the following sentences have different meanings. lately I've been overthinking about tenses which I've been using fluently my whole life. Specifically present perfect Context: ...
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1 answer
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Relative pronoun "whose"

Tait's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 3, page 637 reads If he start game on one man's lands, and pursue it to those of another, ...it is neither the property of the man on whose lands it started, nor of ...
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5 votes
3 answers
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The/My father who

Here's a quote from A Student's Introduction to English Grammar: On the basis of this kind of contrast, the two types of relative clause are traditionally called ‘restrictive’ (or sometimes ‘defining’...
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2 votes
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The definition of 'clause' in modern grammar: construction vs function

Most modern grammars recognize verbless clauses such as the boy on the roof in (1) and on the roof in (2): (1) With the boy on the roof, they feared he might jump off it. (2) When on the roof, he ...
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How does "that" work in this sentence by Ken Follett?

At the beginning of Ken Follett's book The Pillars of the Earth, he wrote: "It is in this rich tapestry, where kings and queens are corrupt, that the common man shows eternal promise -- and one ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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"Both of them" // "Both of whom"

I'm trying to understand and explain to my students why 'both of whom' is the correct answer in the following sentence: "Credit must also be given to Katheryn and Aiden, both of whom I am ...
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I can't tell the difference between the area of where and the area where [closed]

Conservation: a People Centred Approach By Francis Gilbert, Hilary Gilbert The impact of climate change on animals and plants interacts with habitat loss and fragmentation. This is because the main ...
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'Who' and 'That' are not always interchangeable

When using relative clauses, we encounter two types: defining and non-defining. We use commas with the former and not with the latter. We know a lot of people who live in London. John, who speaks ...
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A simple question about relative clauses

I just don't have a good reserve of names of parts of speech, so the question may be quite soft-ball. I mean to say, "I am the only idiot in this world." Now I want to convey the same ...
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9 votes
2 answers
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'the one you said you liked best' - Analysis of a relative clause using CGEL

I'm currently reading "A Student's Introduction to English Grammar" by Geoffrey K. Pullum and Rodney Huddleston. I'm bewildered by the following exercise, which asks us to identify the ...
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Is this a correct usage of "what is"?

A philologist I know constructed a sentence like this: The choice of language was determined by the need of integration of the module in the system, and by the fact that [language] has a large number ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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With "being" vs without "being"

Here are two sentences: The training examples get labels 1 or 0 based on the tactics being useful or not for the proof state. We take the inspiration from the paper and implement an online version ...
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Clause between comma [duplicate]

When the number of observations is even, say 2n, it is customary to define the median as the average of the nth and (n +1)st rank-ordered values. The clause 'say 2n' between two comma appears to be ...
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1 vote
3 answers
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Is "where" the only relative pronoun that cannot be omitted from an adjective clause?

When using adjective clauses, the relative pronoun can be omitted when it is not the subject of the sentence. For example: "She is the person I ran into." In the above example, being the ...
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Is this the correct way to form this sentence?

I'm not sure how to construct this sentence: "Imagine buying a house, information about which has been withheld." or "Imagine buying a house about which information has been been ...
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Struggling to look at grammatical modifiers

I have a passion for English, and I am trying to improve my fluency day by day. Today, I am quite confused when my teacher, a non-native speaker of English, tells me that a sentence in my essay is ...
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