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Questions tagged [redundancy]

Questions about redundant constructions, pleonasms, etc.

60
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8answers
23k views

“My personal opinion is…” Is it always pointless to use the words “personal” and “personally”?

Is this kind of redundancy acceptable in both speech and writing, formal and informal ? Would the following sentences have their meaning changed if we omitted "personal" or "personally" ? Would they ...
43
votes
11answers
17k views

Is the usage of 'personally' in 'I personally don't like something' redundant?

What is the difference between the following? I personally don't like wax museums. I don't like wax museums. The adverb personally does not seem to emphasize anything here. Is it redundant?...
31
votes
7answers
8k views

Is “Needless to say” ever worth saying? [closed]

I get a weird twinge in my stomach whenever I have the urge to write "Needless to say." If it's needless to say, it would seem stupid to say it. Am I right? Am I wrong?
19
votes
4answers
11k views

Why do street parking signs say “no stopping or standing”?

I see redundancy here. If one stands a car on the street, isn't it necessary to stop first? It would seem the most logical and efficient use of language for the sign would be "no stopping." Or do ...
17
votes
2answers
3k views

Isn't the word “shotgun” a self-redundancy? [closed]

I was googling the reason for why it's called "shotgun" to ride beside the driver when it suddenly hit me - why on Earth is the firearm called "shotgun"?! Is there any other kind of a gun than one ...
15
votes
3answers
11k views

Is “very crucial” redundant?

This came up as a multiple-choice question in an exam. Is using "very crucial" redundant?. . . or tautology?
15
votes
2answers
97k views

Do you need the “why” in “That's the reason why”? [duplicate]

I often hear people say things like “That's the reason why I....” As far as I know, “That's the reason I...” would still be grammatically correct, but I can't find anything stating one way or the ...
14
votes
6answers
33k views

The use of “exact same”

My English teacher feels very strongly that exact same is redundant and therefore incorrect. I disagree with her. She feels that exact should be used in place of exact same, but I have rarely heard ...
13
votes
2answers
2k views

Can a hyphen be used without anything on the right side?

From this page: [...] in early parts of this century when it was the most user- and hardware-friendly Linux operating system available [...] Is the user- fragment valid (outside this technical/...
12
votes
2answers
6k views

“PIN Number” — why do we say it?

We often say "PIN Number", this is part of everyday conversation. But why? PIN stands for Personal Identification Number, so what we're actually saying is Personal Identification Number Number. Is ...
12
votes
3answers
1k views

Is “alienesque” a redundant form of “alien” as a adjective?

I googled and tried to search words like gigantesque, alienesque, and animalesque so that I could know whether they are informal or redundant forms of giant, alien, and animal, respectively. But not ...
12
votes
3answers
1k views

Is “time period” a redundant expression?

It seems to me that "time period" is frequently used in speech and writing. But isn't it redundant? These books were written during different time periods These books were written at different times ...
11
votes
5answers
125k views

Is the phrase “please kindly” redundant?

The colleagues in my office often send email starting with "Please kindly". Are the two phrases a bit redundant?
11
votes
2answers
110k views

Is “discuss about” grammatically incorrect? [closed]

Someone told me that I shouldn't use the phrase discuss about, but should say, instead, discuss (the topic). He said discuss means talk about and using discuss about is like saying talk about about, ...
10
votes
6answers
22k views

What does “cyber-” actually mean?

I'm heading into the postgraduate phase of my Computer Science-oriented studies, and I can't put my finger on what this root means. According to Etymology Online it comes from Cybernetics, which in ...
9
votes
7answers
17k views

Is there any difference in meaning between “faith” and “blind faith”?

To use the term blind faith, is to use an adjective needlessly. I had heard the above quote from a positivist friend some time ago. Also, the dictionaries define "faith" as a "belief that is not ...
9
votes
6answers
15k views

Is it correct to say “cold temperature”?

Is it correct to say "cold temperature"?
7
votes
2answers
2k views

Is the term “Dead bodies” incorrect? [closed]

Recently, a guest faculty at our college delivered a lecture on the most commonly made errors in English. He pointed out the following sentence: There were 5 dead bodies. He said that the above ...
6
votes
2answers
6k views

Is “per each” redundant?

I have come accross "per each" several times when editing scientific papers, but it sounds unnatural and even redundant. Doesn't "per" mean "for each" already, thus making "per each" redundant or ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Is the phrase “refuse to accept” redundant?

The word "refuse" is an antonym of the word "accept"; does this make the phrase "refuse to accept" redundant and/or linguistically incorrect?
5
votes
2answers
6k views

Is “naturally flavored with other natural flavors” redundant? [closed]

I see this on many fruity soda cans, like Fanta, Sunkist, and Minute Maid, where it will read "Orange Soda - Naturally Flavored with Other Natural Flavors" If they're all natural flavors, isn't it ...
5
votes
4answers
934 views

Do I need another 'which' in this sentence?

I'm trying to make the sentence below sound better: As a first year undergraduate, I am keen to explore possible careers which, I think, would challenge me and (which) would allow me to create ...
5
votes
6answers
15k views

Is “may or may not” redundant?

(Note: I'm not talking about the same kind of redundancy as in this question). Is "may or may not" correct, or is it a redundant version of "may or not"? I've seen both, and I don't know which one(s) ...
5
votes
3answers
12k views

Is saying “candor and honesty” grammatically correct?

I recently read the sentence Thank you for your candor and honesty. Is that grammatically correct? To me it seems redundant as candor is a synonym for honesty. Does candor have other meanings ...
5
votes
8answers
13k views

Is the phrase “consistently inconsistent” redundant and does it have a single word?

I stumbled on this phrase today, but have seen it in news articles and blogs, as well. Here's an example from this site: To put it mildly, the result of exercise was and remains consistently ...
5
votes
2answers
4k views

When did “crew” become a sport? When did “crew team” come into use?

When I was a child, there was a sport called rowing; if four or more people rowed together in the same boat, they would be known as a crew. At some point, either before or during my childhood, the ...
5
votes
3answers
58k views

Is the phrase “a stark contrast” redundant?

Merriam-Webster defines stark as "sharply delineated." The same dictionary defines a contrast as a "juxtaposition of dissimilar elements." Doesn't it follow then that "a stark contrast" essentially ...
5
votes
4answers
444 views

“Currently online now”

About 12,600,000 results in Google for this exact phrasing: "Currently online now". Is it a kind of online jargon? It sounds redundant to me; shouldn't it be either "currently" or "now"? Examples ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Is it redundant to use “or not” at the end of a sentence weighing two options? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Whether or not” vs. “whether” For example: "I was unsure whether to pity him." "I was unsure whether to pity him or not."
5
votes
3answers
1k views

At least two or more: Not always redundant?

At least two or more Is the “or more” bit above ever not redundant? Seems absolutely redundant to me, but it gets about 170 million Google hits, and many from government sites and university sites.
4
votes
4answers
1k views

Is the phrase “spherical ball” redundant?

In a computer science course, our professor was explaining the idea of object oriented programming using the analogy of soccer. While reading the Wikipedia article on Association Football, it said ...
4
votes
7answers
7k views

Is it redundant to say that something is “clearly evident”?

Here's a sentence: "The volume of resources invested is clearly evident." Is this redundant?
4
votes
3answers
403 views

Is saying “an obsolete remnant” redundant?

Is saying "an obsolete remnant" or "an old remnant" redundant (or tautologous), or can the adjective be necessary to convey what I'm trying to say? (I imagined "remnant" already carries the ...
4
votes
2answers
897 views

Is “recorded history” redundant?

I've heard many times phrases like "this particular thing has been a fact of life throughout recorded history". In fact there is this definition: Recorded history or written history is a ...
4
votes
3answers
11k views

Is “over-saturated” redundant?

For me, "saturated" implies there couldn't exist more of given quantity, like concentration of substance in a solution. So "over-saturated" (as in "over-saturated market") seems redundant.
4
votes
2answers
943 views

Is 'external' in 'external appearance' redundant when talking about a person's looks?

Recently, I came across an essay titled "should we judge people by their external appearance?" The title made me think whether or not 'external' is redundant in this sentence. Oxford Collocations ...
4
votes
2answers
11k views

Additionally … also

[disclosure: I'm not a native speaker of English] I work as a university professor. When writing up lecture notes as well as research papers, I have a tendency to write things like the following. ...
4
votes
4answers
3k views

“Schedule in advance” vs “schedule”. Is “in advance” unnecessary?

I'm not sure if it is correct to say "schedule in advance" or just "schedule". Is it correct to say "schedule in advance" or should it just be "schedule" and "in advance" is unnecessary? What's the ...
4
votes
4answers
1k views

Is “crucially important” redundant?

I've come across the phrase crucially important many times. More than 100,000 hits on Google Scholar, and it even appears in some of the answers on this site. However, crucial already means "...
3
votes
8answers
3k views

Examples of “ATM Machine” silly repeats? [closed]

Swedes often say CD Skiva as in Compact disk disk. In English you sometimes say ATM machine as in Automated teller machine machine. What are other examples of such redundant endings?
3
votes
5answers
498 views

Is it IQ or IQ score?

What's the correct way to use the term intelligence quotient in a sentence? Jim's IQ is 130. –or– Jim's IQ score is 130.
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Is it wrong to say “Music Concert”?

Concerts, by definition, feature music. Isn't specifying a concert to be a music concert needlessly redundant?
3
votes
4answers
4k views

Is the “will” in “can and will” necessary?

Anyone who's ever seen much American film or television has heard some variation of the following sentences countless times: You have the right to remain silent. If you choose to give up that ...
3
votes
3answers
92 views

Is “barista bar” redundant?

I am editing something that mentions a "barista bar." Is this redundant? Is it like saying a "bartender bar"? If I'm not mistaken, a barista is the Italian word for a male or female bartender, and ...
3
votes
4answers
2k views

Is 'co-conspirator' redundant?

I've noticed in the news that multiple individuals involved in a crime are referred to as co-conspirators. Etymonline gives the origin of conspire: conspire (v.): late 14c., from Old French ...
3
votes
4answers
3k views

“May or May Not” Redundancy

I may or may not contact you later. Isn't this redundant? Unless I'm missing something, the meaning can be expressed equally well with: I may contact you later. Or even: I might contact you ...
3
votes
2answers
886 views

How to avoid repeating a word already contained in “RAID”?

I was recently answering a question on Super User about RAID. In this context RAID means "redundant array of independent (or inexpensive) disks". I wanted to point out to fellow user that he should ...
3
votes
2answers
7k views

Is “quintessential example” correct usage?

Since quintessential means "representing the perfect example of a class" is it correct to use "the quintessential example" as in this sentence: "Electrons are the quintessential example of (...
3
votes
1answer
877 views

Is “these are also hidden features as well” a redundant sentence?

These are also hidden features as well. Is this redundant? I do this a lot, where I say "also" followed by "as well".
3
votes
1answer
85 views

What is the error called when a letter of an abbreviation is spelled out afterwards?

HIV Virus DNS System IRC Chat LCD Display RAID Array These are some examples for this and people do this quite often.