Questions tagged [redundancy]

Questions about redundant constructions, pleonasms, etc.

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29 views

Isn't “authorized designee” redundant?

I write and revise policy at work, and I often see the phrase "authorized designee," as in "The Chief Executive Officer or the authorized designee is responsible for ensuring . . ."...
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26 views

Is “prune down” correct usage?

Prune meaning to cut down something or chop down. I am writing to a user that I am removing additional permissions from her profile which are irrelevant to her daily work. So would it be correct if I ...
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1answer
51 views

What does “Find focus on your customers.” mean?

I am editing a piece of marketing with the headline "Find focus on your customers." Is it redundant to use "find" with "focus"? I'm not sure I understand what "find ...
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0answers
19 views

Is the term “next consecutive” redundant in this sentence?

Is the term "next consecutive" redundant in the following sentence? : "This movie will be the next consecutive movie in the series." Referring to the most recent movie that will ...
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2answers
34 views

How do I maintain the comparison between two things in this sentence without it sounding redundant? [closed]

Consider this sentence: "Like drinking water, bleeding blood is normal." The phrase "bleeding blood" is clearly redundant, but were I to exclude "blood," I would ruin the ...
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0answers
25 views

Is “from” superflous following “stop” or “prevent”?

I seem to encounter this more from British speakers, but they'll often say something like Protect it from heat to prevent the contents expanding. instead of Protect it from heat to prevent the ...
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1answer
70 views

How does redundancy work in English? [closed]

In English, there are many tendencies towards what I understand to be redundant. Why do people say expressions like "sit down", "fall down", "jump up": if you were to sit,...
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25 views

“Also” and “as well” in the same sentence

Make sure that the keyboard shortcuts are accessible using US keyboard layout (since it guarantees that they will be also accessible using almost any other keyboard layout—e.g., German one—as well). ...
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1answer
83 views

etc. etc. usage [closed]

Is there any rule to use etc. twice like etc. etc.
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2answers
53 views

She stole her best friend’s boyfriend (from her)

She stole her best friend’s boyfriend (from her) What is the reason for adding the redundant phrase from her after mentioning that it's her best friend?
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22 views

Where vs. In places where

He built cathedrals in places where there were no cathedrals. The New Yorker Many Medicare patients live in places where only one H.M.O. The New York Times What is the trait you most deplore in others?...
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2answers
65 views

Is it redundant to say “global pandemic”? [duplicate]

It seems that the word pandemic is generally understood to refer to a large or global geographic area. Is it therefore redundant to say "global pandemic" in a sentence such as, "The ...
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71 views

Is using “rather” and “instead” in the same sentence tautology?

I was in the process of writing an email to my university project supervisor about several meetings we need to schedule for the upcoming weeks. I wanted to ask him if one meeting is sufficient, or if ...
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663 views

Is is correct to use ' we refer to your mail trailing below

Is it correct to use 'we refer to your mail trailing below' or is below redundant here or optional.
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29 views

Should I omit the article? Also, is the preposition “of” redundant?

In the sentence below, should I omit the article because "efficiencies" is plural and uncountable? Is the second "of" redundant? How can I make this sentence more concise? The factors that influence ...
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1answer
60 views

Difference between drawn and haggard [closed]

In the novel Rage of Angels by Sidney Sheldon, we read: She watched Adam now as he sat at his desk looking drawn and haggard. Dictionaries such as Oxford and Cambridge are showing the same or ...
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186 views

Is the expression “specifically tailored” redundant?

I guess the title pretty much covers it, but I'd like to complete the sentence just in case: "The literature seems to lack a treatment specifically tailored to such method"
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21 views

Using “test” after TOEIC and TOEFL [duplicate]

Recently, I've seen a few examples of people writing either "I took the TOEIC test" or "I took the TOEFL test". They tend to be ESL students, so I don't want to be a grammar Nazi about it, but for my ...
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1answer
63 views

Is this an unnecessary “that”?? I'm confused whether or not to add a “that” in specific sentences [duplicate]

"The universally recognized raw text format that any computer can understand." OR "The universally recognized raw text format any computer can understand. This is a definition for a computer ...
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1answer
37 views

Is it redundant to say “remove the presence of X” instead of “remove X”?

I sometimes come across "remove the presence of", e.g. "remove the presence of these compounds". You can try a Google search for the exact phrase "remove the presence of" (with quotes) and you can see ...
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2answers
449 views

Long-lasting durability

If a sentence contains 'long-lasting durability,' is it redundant? For example: Robust plastic construction ensures long-lasting durability. Long-lasting and durability, do they mean the same thing? ...
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1answer
103 views

Referring to a figure

I’m writing a paper that has a number of figures that compare two images, and I’m constantly debating whether it’s necessary to repeat the figure number when I compare those images in the text. For ...
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2answers
61 views

What is the meaning of “annihilated in detail”?

I ran across the phrase "annihilated in detail" while listening to Professor Garrett G. Fagan's instruction regarding the History of Ancient Rome. This comes from a lecture on Marius and Sulla with ...
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1answer
3k views

Is “pre-prepared” redundant?

I've noticed recently the "word" pre-prepared popping up in my daily life, and if my completely selection-biased anecdotes are any evidence, it seems to be catching on. Is there any reason why the '...
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2answers
60 views

Is “new changes” redundant?

"Exam comes with 3 new changes" Three big changes have been introduced in this year's Form Three examination under a new format.
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1answer
38 views

term for obvious “stuttering” in print

Is there a name for an obviously erroneous duplication of a word in a print medium? For example (with apologies to Mr. Lincoln)" "Four-score and seven seven years ago..." If someone is relatively ...
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4answers
208 views

Is “really redundant” redundant?

Have been having this argument for a while. Is saying "really redundant" or "very redundant" or something along those lines redundant in and of itself?
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2answers
304 views

Is it correct to use both “On the other hand” and “instead” in a single sentence?

I have this sentence "On the other hand, you can go to this page instead." but I am not sure if the presence of both On the other hand and instead makes the sentence redundant.
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1answer
181 views

Can I 'contrive a plan' ? Would it result in redundancy?

For example: 'He contrived a plan to thwart his promotion'. From what I could find , 'contrive' had the meaning 'to invent , devise'. So like we can say that 'He devised a plan'/'He invented a scheme' ...
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4answers
1k views

Is “alienesque” a redundant form of “alien” as a adjective?

I googled and tried to search words like gigantesque, alienesque, and animalesque so that I could know whether they are informal or redundant forms of giant, alien, and animal, respectively. But not ...
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1answer
93 views

treacly vs. syrupy in figurative use

I wonder how, if at all, treacly and syrupy in figurative use differ in meaning, register, connotation, or in some other way. The figurative senses are frequently defined synonymously in dictionaries. ...
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1answer
181 views

Redundant words — “little bit”

He sandwiches tastier by spreading a little bit of cranberry sauce on the bread. In the above sentence, is "little bit" redundant? Should it be either "little" or "bit"? I checked the pair of words ...
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3answers
208 views

Is “barista bar” redundant?

I am editing something that mentions a "barista bar." Is this redundant? Is it like saying a "bartender bar"? If I'm not mistaken, a barista is the Italian word for a male or female bartender, and ...
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1answer
143 views

“May I help the next customer on line.” [closed]

Leaving aside the regional dialect that might cause someone to say "on line" or "in line," isn't the line what establishes who the next customer is -- and so therefore redundant? Wouldn't a simple "...
13
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3answers
5k views

Is “time period” a redundant expression?

It seems to me that "time period" is frequently used in speech and writing. But isn't it redundant? These books were written during different time periods These books were written at different times ...
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1answer
348 views

Is “the general public” redundant?

Is "the general public" redundant? Or is it different from "the public"?
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1answer
103 views

Is the phrase “mutual trust” redundant?

The phrase is being used in the following sentence: "Always keep your promises and seek to strengthen mutual trust." I feel that the sentence would be better with just "trust", but the person who ...
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4answers
4k views

Is “moreover/further/furthermore/besides/additionally” used together with “also” a redundancy?

I read from The Free Thesaurus that "moreover", "further", "furthermore", "besides", "additionally", as well as "also" are synonyms. So is using one of those words along with an "also" in a style ...
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4answers
4k views

Is “crucially important” redundant?

I've come across the phrase crucially important many times. More than 100,000 hits on Google Scholar, and it even appears in some of the answers on this site. However, crucial already means "...
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1answer
1k views

“Leave nothing (left) behind”

In the lyrics for "What are you waiting for" from Disturbed, there is the line: Leave nothing left behind I'm debating whether "left" is superfluous and here only for rythm, or if the expression "...
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1answer
296 views

Term for describing what you like using particular adjectives

Suppose someone makes statements like these: I like tasty food. I like beautiful pictures. I like well-written dramas / novels / articles / et cetera. I like good music. As you see all those ...
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3answers
97 views

Is the phrase “parking garage” redundant?

Is there an instance in which the use of the word "garage" as opposed to "parking garage" would imply something other than a structure where vehicles are parked?
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6answers
476 views

Is “new update” redundant? [closed]

The sentence is: While different, the sites are becoming more and more alike with each new update. Is "new update" redundant?
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1answer
4k views

please *kindly* disregard [duplicate]

Not sure if my question is considered redundant to another one that was asked of if "please kindly" generally is a redundant expression. I am curious if "please disregard my message" is polite ...
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2answers
69 views

Redundant Phrasing

Is is redundant to say that something is "fully intact"? To me, it appears that it is, but I have found it in some reputable sources, such as newspapers.
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1answer
1k views

What is it called when we follow an acronym with a word already in the acronym? [duplicate]

Example: PIN Number (PIN=Personal Identification Number), no need to repeat number RSVP please (RSVP=Answer please in French), no need to say please again etc.
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3answers
303 views

Is it redundant to say “percentage of one hundred”?

I have seen the word "percentage" defined as "a number or rate that is expressed as a certain number of parts of something divided into 100 parts". It seems to follow that 50% means "50 parts of ...
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2answers
779 views

Is it common to end a sentence with “very”?

I've read Practical English Usage by M. Swan to get the notion of ellipsis and find out whether it is possible to make a sentence below but I got to nowhere. It ends with "very" and I'm not sure ...
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1answer
2k views

Is “may not necessarily be” reduandant or does it differ from “are not necessarily”?

I feel like both "may not" and "not necessarily" contain the idea of possibility. Therefore, I find "may not necessarily" somewhat redundant. I would like to know whether "may not" can always be ...
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1answer
346 views

Is it redundant to say a 'unique nuance'?

Is it redundant to include 'unique' in this expression if I'm discussing the irregularities of surfers' waves?