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Questions tagged [proper-nouns]

A proper noun or proper name is a noun representing a unique entity as opposed to a common noun, which represents a class of entities or non-unique instances of that class. Proper nouns are usually, but not invariably, capitalized in English.

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The Southern US, or the southern US? [duplicate]

To my understanding, specific geographic regions are always capitalized. For example, Southern US is proper because it is a specific region. However, a co-author argues that southern should not be ...
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Use “the” before a scientific method name? [closed]

I'm writing a paper about an algorithm that I have developed. Just for illustration, I will say that the method name is "quicksort". My question is about the usage of the in the following context: ...
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1answer
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In film reviews/essays about a book or film, does the title of the movie/book always have to be highlighted/put in italics? [closed]

In film reviews/essays about a book or film, does the title of the movie/book always have to be highlighted/put in italics? I know that at the start you have to put the title in italics, e.g.: ...
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Capitalisation in texts where the title is also a concept that is referred to within the text?

I'm going to use Karpman's drama triangle as an example for my question because I can't seem to find any consistency around its capitalisation (although I'll admit I don't own the book). Say you have ...
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2answers
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East Coast, East coast, or east coast? [duplicate]

Is it East Coast, East coast, or east coast when used in a sentence such as, "The airline flies to both the East Coast and the West Coast?" I've seen it all ways. I can't find a definitive answer as ...
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1answer
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Plurals, Possesives, and Proper Nouns ending with 'S' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the correct possessive for nouns ending in s? I just took a grammar quiz in 10th grade English Honors, and one of the questions was very interesting to me. In this ...
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Is “a” mandatory in “I'm a whole new (Name)”?

Let's say, your name is Kate and you say "I'm a whole new Kate!" Now, can you drop "a" and say "I'm whole new Kate!"? Or is it mandatory to keep it?
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Is there a rule of thumb when to use “the” in front of universities? [duplicate]

I am writing biographies for some of my doctors. I have asked several people and have received several different answers. Here are a couple examples: Lee is a 2005 graduate of the University of ...
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Subject/verb agreement when a title ends in a plural

1) "The book 'The Three Musketeers' is a wonderful example of..." Here we have a proper noun, a title that happens to end in a plural, and I have no sense that the verb should be plural. "Musketeers"/...
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How to handle non-standard capitalization in formal letters

I am writing a letter to apply for entry into a graduate-level university program through my company. I am struggling on how to write the name of the company in the letter. The company's trademark is ...
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1answer
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Possessive and plural suffixes for proper nouns ending in -s [closed]

With a name that ends in -s, such as Travis or Lewis, where and when should you use -es, -'s, -s or just leave it alone to both pluralise, and to infer belonging to? E.g., if the ball belongs to ...
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Capitalization of the word “the” in “the Lord” / “The Lord”

Should I capitalize the word "the" when speaking of God as "the/The Lord"? I praise the Lord. or... I praise The Lord.
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Do I need “the” before the name of my university in the header? [duplicate]

Do I need "the" before the name of my university in the header? Header: Politechnika Wroclawska - name of university in my language (the Wroclaw University of Technology) - translated name of ...
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“Are” vs. “is” for proper nouns which sound plural (such as band names)

I was trying to explain to a friend that someone is no longer available on Spotify earlier today so I said the sentence: The Avalanches are no longer available on Spotify. Immediately after saying ...
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Is “Thank god”, as opposed to “Thank God”, acceptable?

People are quite stingy lately about anything with religious connotations, so I'm worried that the phrase "thank God" might tick some people off. Is "thank god" acceptable? Would that offend people ...
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Why we capitalize all race names but our own

This question about alien species and planets brought up something I've been thinking about on and off for years. We capitalize names of alien races like Vulcan, Timelord, Cylon (well, maybe not ...
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How do you spell Muammar Qaddafi?

This name, which is spelled القذافي in Arabic, is spelled in so many different ways in the Latin alphabet: Gadafi, Gadaffi, Gaddafi, Gaddaffi, Gadhafi, Gadhaffi, Ghadafi, Ghadaffi, Ghaddafi, ...
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What is the difference between 'Muslim" and 'Islamic'?

I have seen 'Muslim' and 'Islamic' both used as adjectives to describe things relating to Islam. Is there a nuanced difference between the two words? I know that 'Muslim' can also be used as a noun, ...
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Why does Germany's English name differ from its German name?

Germany in German is Deutschland and the language is Deutsch. I'm used to words being anglicized, but why is there a complete replacement in this case?
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When did we stop translating proper names?

It used to be that one would just translate a proper name that was in another language into English when referring to that entity. For example, William the Conqueror, Christopher Columbus, King ...
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What is the first recorded appearance of the mistranslation “Red Square”?

Does anybody know when the mistranslation "Red Square" made its first recorded appearance? Have there been any noteworthy attempts at establishing the correct translation "Beautiful Square" at some ...
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Capitalization: when does a phrase become a proper noun?

This is a question on capitalization. Proper nouns are capitalized. But how can I tell which parts of a term constitute a proper noun? Take, for example, the nickname for traveler's diarrhea (sorry, ...
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Words based on the names of gods [closed]

While the word christen means "to baptise" or "to make Christian", in another sense, it has shed its religious connotations to simply mean "to name" or even "use for the first time". Is there any ...
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plural of 'Davidovici'

I know someone named Davidovici, pronounced /dəˈvɪɾəvɪtʃ/ (i.e., rhyming with witch. It's from Romanian). How is it pluralized (as, to refer to the family): Davidovicis or Davidovicies?
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Is it grammatical to say “the batmen”?

As far as I know, the five actors to have played the role of Batman in films are Adam West, Michael Keaton, Val Kilmer, George Clooney, and Christian Bale. Is it grammatical to call them "the batmen"?
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Etymology of proper nouns

I had an argument with a friend regarding etymology of the word "Oz" in "The wizard of Oz". I believe that it doesn't have any etymology, and that generally most proper nouns don't have any origin. He ...
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In English, are words like 'English,' 'Monday,' and 'January' considered common nouns or proper nouns?

In English, are names of languages (English, French), days of the week (Monday, Sunday) and months of the year (November, January) considered common nouns or proper nouns? I know they're all ...
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Is “Monday” a proper noun or a common noun?

I can understand why Monday is an abstract noun (it isn't something we can perceive with any of our 5 senses), But is Monday considered a proper noun or a common noun?
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Possessive case for a certain proper noun - ss apostrophe [duplicate]

In the case of the proper noun Ross, which of the following would be correct? Ross's Ross'
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Do military titles get capitalized?

I'm pretty sure "Commander Shepard" is preferable to "commander Shepard," but I'm less sure about "the Commander" vs "the commander." On one hand, I'm pretty sure "commander" is a common noun in this ...
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1answer
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Why it is “the Grinch” but not just Grinch as it's his personal name

We don't use the definite article with personal names, however here....why is it so? Yeah, I know sometimes we can use "the". When it's a person everybody knows about or smth like that. But why it'...
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2answers
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Yoga (proper-case) or yoga (lowercase)?

I've seen it written in both ways. I'm tempted to use the proper case, because I was under the impression that it is also a form/name of religion. What do you think?
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Is it correct to have 'a' before a proper noun? [duplicate]

According to my knowledge, the indefinite article 'a' must never be used before a proper noun. But I recently heard the English sentence: "Every civilian should be a Mahatma Gandhi to his society". ...
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1answer
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Choice of relative pronouns: 'who' and/or 'that' for people?

Albert Einstein is a German-born theoretical physicist. He became world-famous for his general theory of relativity. If you turn these two sentences into one, a main clause + a relative clause, you ...
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Why does binomial nomenclature seem to break case rules?

According to the Wiki page for binomial nomenclature, we are supposed to capitalize the first word when naming species regardless of where it occurs in the sentence. To me, this seem very incongruous ...
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Is the game, “go,” a proper noun? What about “checkers” or “chess”?

The game of Go is... or The game of go is... Apparently the International Go Federation capitalizes it. Its dictionary entry doesn't appear to be (from what I have seen). It seems to fit the ...
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What does the most common usage of 'Korea' mean in modern-day English-speaking world?

On Meta.Travel.SE, we have a debate whether our 'Korea' tag should be mapped to 'South Korea'. One of the answers - from the moderator who made the synonym mapping - is that common usage of the word '...
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2answers
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How do I perform presidential proper noun declension?

I'm unfamiliar with how one approaches the declension of proper nouns, especially as it pertains to presidents, e.g., Jeffersonian. I suspect it's kind of a black art. I need to do this with Coolidge ...
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Why is it “Paris’s cafés” but “Massachusetts’ capital”?

I’ve been studying the apostrophe and found this in Merriam-Webster’s Guide to Punctuation and Style: The possessives of proper names are generally formed in the same way as those of common nouns. ...
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Why is “a” necessary before “Mr. X” and “Mrs. Y”?

There is the following sentence in the scene a reputed lawyer, Thomas Cohen gives advice to 16-year old client William Kane, the son of deceased bank owner on the issue of inheritance of his father’s ...
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3answers
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What does “Clyst” mean?

I live in the south west of England and there are many villages and roads that feature the word "Clyst". For example, Broadclyst, Clyst St Mary, Clyst Honiton and so on. What does clyst mean, and ...
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Accurate British English term for an oblong deck from shore out into a lake where you tie your rowing boat

This is a typical image of the structure in question: There are also some variations, shown in this Google image search. But I'm after the often not very wide, some 20-30 feet long wood construction ...
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8answers
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Should Philip have P. or Ph. as an initial?

In the context of scientific articles and technical white papers, references to other publications typically include the author’s surname with, depending on the format of the specific publication, ...
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Plural of “iPod Touch”

What is the plural of iPod Touch? Should it be iPods Touch or iPod Touches?
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Is there any convention for pronouncing proper nouns?

Is there any convention as to how proper nouns with origins outside English should be pronounced? I have heard claims to the effect that "a proper noun can be pronounced however you wish"; is that ...
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4answers
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Why is god, a common noun, capitalized? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should the word “God” be capitalized? I thought god is a common noun, but many people capitalize it when it is not the first letter of a sentence or a title.
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0answers
648 views

How to handle the possessive case of the name Franks [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the correct possessive for nouns ending in s? When did it become correct to add an 's' to a singular possessive already ending in 's'? Hey guys I was ...
2
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1answer
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Does the properness of 'Street' (in the name of a street) survive when discussing two particular streets together?

So do Smith St and Wesson St meet: "at the corner of Smith & Wesson Streets"; or "at the corner of Smith & Wesson streets"?
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1answer
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significance of “The” before country name [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Using the definite article before a country/state name I am from India, and I do not say that I am from “the India”. But someone from USA would say “I am from the United ...
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2answers
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indefinite article plus proper name in organizational (i.e. business or bureaucracy) contexts

The use of the indefinite article with a proper name occurs often in business or organizational speech-contexts: We're lucky to have a Bill Jones to get the job done. The article plus proper ...