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Questions tagged [proper-nouns]

A proper noun or proper name is a capitalized noun representing a unique entity as opposed to a common noun, which represents a class of entities or nonunique instances of that class.

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Possessive and plural suffixes for proper nouns ending in -s [closed]

With a name that ends in -s, such as Travis or Lewis, where and when should you use -es, -'s, -s or just leave it alone to both pluralise, and to infer belonging to? E.g., if the ball belongs to ...
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Why is it “Paris’s cafés” but “Massachusetts’ capital”?

I’ve been studying the apostrophe and found this in Merriam-Webster’s Guide to Punctuation and Style: The possessives of proper names are generally formed in the same way as those of common nouns. ...
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Should I capitalize the word 'Web' in this sentence?

A dedicated web server may be required, depending on XXX, YYY, ZZZ, and the total number of concurrent Web users
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Is there a way to refer to the biblical state of Israel in another name?

The biblical and modern day states of Israel have the same name, even though they are not the same entities. Is there a name for the biblical state of Israel which is diffrent from Israel? Like the ...
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Should “Applied Cryptography” be capitalized? Is it a proper noun?

I'm trying to write a cover letter for a fairly prestigious job, and I'm aiming for (arguably too much) perfection in my cover letter. I don't want to be turned away only because the hiring people ...
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Which expression is older: “London Royal Parks” or “London's Royal Parks” ? And why is it Hyde Park and not Hyde's Park?

London Royal Parks and London's Royal Parks Both phrases are used, and I understand that "London" in the first example is acting as an adjective. Whereas in the second, "London", is used as a ...
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What are the associations of the word “Heights” in a city name? [closed]

There are lots of cities and other designations with the word "Heights" in the name. Does this refer to something specific? Is it a marketing tactic perhaps? Examples: Hacienda Heights Sterling ...
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Does a name go before or after the noun it modifies?

The sentence The user “john_smith” has been registered; go to the “User Profile” tab to view the user’s details. reads more naturally to me than The “john_smith” user has been registered; go to ...
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Article before newspaper name

Suppose the name of a newspaper is Pirate Times, without an article. Which of the following is then correct, and why? During the recent General Assembly, Pirate Times met… During the recent ...
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Who verbally uses the title “Miss” with a female's first name (regardless of the female's correct title) and why? [duplicate]

Who verbally uses the title "Miss" with a female's first name (regardless of the female's correct title) and why? Example: Meet with Miss Debbie in the conference room at 2 o'clock.
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In film reviews/essays about a book or film, does the title of the movie/book always have to be highlighted/put in italics? [closed]

In film reviews/essays about a book or film, does the title of the movie/book always have to be highlighted/put in italics? I know that at the start you have to put the title in italics, e.g.: ...
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Can I use the “ll” contraction with proper names?

Can I contract "will" as "ll" when preceded by a proper name? For example: John will visit you tomorrow John'll visit you tomorrow I am inclined to think this is not acceptable in standard ...
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Pronunciation of “Oceania” in British English

How is Oceania properly pronounced in British English? Is it /ˌəʊʃɪˈɑːnɪə/, or /ˌəʊʃɪˈɑːnə/? I know a lot of people who use the latter, but I have always been taught the former.
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Is it customary to call the former President George W. Bush “W.”, and Mrs. Bush “Bar”, in public?

Maureen Dowd deals with the comments of the former first lady, Barbara Bush in NBC’s the Today Show in her article titled ‘Silver Fox’s pink slip’ in New York Times (April 27): “Asked on the “Today”...
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In what contexts would I capitalize “city” and “county”?

In the following context, it is obvious that County is a proper noun and deserves capitalization. Currently, Albemarle County has four main reservoirs. However, in these other contexts below, I ...
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Capitalization of “School” as an adjective

I am working on a research poster, and the teacher supervising wrote the following language. It doesn't seem to me like "School" is a proper noun, but he tells me it is when referring to a specific ...
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Use “the” before a scientific method name? [closed]

I'm writing a paper about an algorithm that I have developed. Just for illustration, I will say that the method name is "quicksort". My question is about the usage of the in the following context: ...
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How should one pronounce “Brichester”?

I know that there is this issue where Worcestershire and Leicester are pronounced as "Wustersher" and "Lester", so I wonder how Brichester is pronounced. Also, is there any special rule which could ...
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Indefinite article and people's names

Sometimes, on the internet, particularly in online games, I see people using the indefinite article before someone's name: "I see a Joey" or "I hug a Polly". I know some of these people and I'm ...
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Origin of street names ending in “-hurst”

There is a large number of streets in the UK whose names end in -hurst, for example Ravenhurst, Gathurst, Oakhurst, Amhurst, Bonehurst, Eaglehurst, etc. Is there a common meaning for this -hurst ...
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Using “the” with name of research center

The name of our research center is Southeastern Transportation Center, STC is the acronym, of course. In writing, I use STC, not 'the STC' but our director says 'the' is needed so that it reads well. ...
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Using articles before titles beginning with articles

What are the rules for the use of articles before titles beginning with articles? Which of the following sentences is correct? I went to the The New York Times office this morning. I went to The New ...
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Why did Obama use “a” in “… to hear a King proclaim that …”

From Obama's second inaugural speech: We, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths – that all of us are created equal – is the star that guides us still; just as it guided our ...
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Why is “a” necessary before “Mr. X” and “Mrs. Y”?

There is the following sentence in the scene a reputed lawyer, Thomas Cohen gives advice to 16-year old client William Kane, the son of deceased bank owner on the issue of inheritance of his father’s ...
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“Al” as a reduction of “Alexander” [closed]

Can I use Al as a reduction of the name Alexander? Is this reduction clear to native English speakers?
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Words based on the names of gods [closed]

While the word christen means "to baptise" or "to make Christian", in another sense, it has shed its religious connotations to simply mean "to name" or even "use for the first time". Is there any ...
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Use of proper noun District Attorney's Office or D. A.'s Office vs district attorney's office

Is it correct to use the lowercase for district attorney's office when a particular office (e.g., Shelby County District Attorney's Office) is not included? Even if you're referring to a particular ...
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Upper or lowercase letter if name at the start of the sentence? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How do you capitalize a proper noun such as “iPhone”? Capitalization of names that begin lowercased, at the beginning of a sentence I have a product that is called xYZ. If I ...
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What is the plural form of trademarked product names, specifically of the term “WordPress”?

On the stackexchange site WordPress Answers, we recently discussed the plural form, or whether one exists at all, of the system we all use. WordPress is a free and open source blogging tool and a ...
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Is “a” mandatory in “I'm a whole new (Name)”?

Let's say, your name is Kate and you say "I'm a whole new Kate!" Now, can you drop "a" and say "I'm whole new Kate!"? Or is it mandatory to keep it?
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Do you capitalize the names of holidays?

I always thought the names of holidays were proper names, and should thus be capitalized "Christmas", "Thanksgiving", etc. However, I recently made a typo when talking about Christmas (Christmsa), and ...
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Why there is an “h” in proper names like Afghanistan, Baghdad and Lamborghini?

An "h" may be used to prevent the "g" from being soft, as in spaghetti, but there is no need for an "h" in the mentioned proper names.
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Pronunciation of “Nevada” [closed]

People in the state of Nevada insist that it should be pronounced /nəˈvædə/ (with the vowel of TRAP)—this "issue" always comes up during campaigns—while much of the country typically pronounces it /...
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Capitalising the definite article in names

When I was a youngster some mumble-mumble-mumble decades ago, I was taught that, in the instances of names of persons, places, and things which carried the definite article the, the article wasn’t ...
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significance of “The” before country name [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Using the definite article before a country/state name I am from India, and I do not say that I am from “the India”. But someone from USA would say “I am from the United ...
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Pluralization of proper nouns: regular or irregular? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Family name pluralization If a proper noun is a homograph of a common noun, is the proper noun subject to the same usage and form rules as the common noun, especially if the ...
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Is it grammatical to say “the batmen”?

As far as I know, the five actors to have played the role of Batman in films are Adam West, Michael Keaton, Val Kilmer, George Clooney, and Christian Bale. Is it grammatical to call them "the batmen"?
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Company names, use of “have” and “has” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are collective nouns always plural, or are certain ones singular? Should company names be followed by "has" or "have"? It depends on whether a company is treated as a singular ...
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Still More Syntactic Confusion [closed]

I sometimes encounter sentences like this Mussolini ordered the Italy invaded Albania. It seems incorrect to me but I want native speakers to prove. UPDATE. The sentence above is taken from ...
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The name of “Scientific American” — two adjectives without a substantive?

Does the name Scientific American consist of two adjectives? What is the substantive?
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Accurate British English term for an oblong deck from shore out into a lake where you tie your rowing boat

This is a typical image of the structure in question: There are also some variations, shown in this Google image search. But I'm after the often not very wide, some 20-30 feet long wood construction ...
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Does the abbreviation for Saint in a church name require a period?

In referring to a local church, does the name "St Giles" require a period after the "St"? I was told that to add a period confuses it with the abbreviation for street.
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Capitalization of software terms--design pattern [closed]

I'm editing a software blog, and the author is describing a design pattern called the "abstract factory pattern." He capitalizes the 'A' and the 'F' in some places and not in others. The Wikipedia ...
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Capitalizing “U” in “United States” [closed]

Is it true that until the Civil War we did not capitalize the U in United States?
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Pronunication of “Dijkstra”

I am a computer professional. I have heard the pronuciation of the word Dijkstra from various sources as di-kstra diji-kstra dik-stra Which is the correct way of pronouncing it?
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Can I say “Do you have a facebook”?

Can I say "Do you have a facebook" to ask if someone has "a Facebook account"? I know it is not grammatically correct. I just wanted to know if people say that or not.
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Why are nouns sometimes pejorative when used attributively?

Certain nouns can often be used as noun adjuncts in place of a corresponding adjective, with no change in literal meaning, where: The noun is not pejorative when used nominatively by itself. Nor is ...
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Is there any convention for pronouncing proper nouns?

Is there any convention as to how proper nouns with origins outside English should be pronounced? I have heard claims to the effect that "a proper noun can be pronounced however you wish"; is that ...
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When to put “River” before or after its name and why?

Unlike mountain names, where "Mount" always precedes its name, e.g. Mount Everest, I've noticed that some rivers have "River" before its name, e.g. the River Nile but others have it after, e.g. the ...
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Why is “Rosen Plevneliev” pronounced with a /z/?

As I have told you in my previous question, I have heard the CBS news about the Bulgarian president visiting the US here. I don't know why, but the way the reporter has pronounced his name makes me ...