Questions tagged [pronunciation]

for questions about the sound, stress, or intonation of spoken words.

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2
votes
1answer
78 views

/æo/ sound in American Accent Training

In American Accent Training, it shows that the "down" is pronounced as /dæon/, where /æo/ is a combination of /æ/ and /o/. However, according to KK or DJ, this sound is a combination of /ɑ/ and /ʊ/. ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

Why is pianist usually stressed on the /pi/?

"Pianist" is usually pronounced /ˈpiənɪst/, with /piˈænɪst/ as an acceptable variant only in the US and Canada, according to Wiktionary. I'm not sure why the pronunciation /ˈpiənɪst/ would be more ...
4
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2answers
130 views

Can you link the [ʃ] sound and [s] sound?

How do you pronounce "English Speakers"? Do you treat sh and s as similar consonants?
2
votes
1answer
63 views

schwa before /r/

Right now, Wikipedia gives the pronunciation of Sirius as /ˈsɪriəs/, but in the past I've seen editors insist on /ˈsɪəriəs/. I take this to mean that it should sound like seer, which I at least ...
40
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4answers
77k views

Pronunciation of “Azure” in “Microsoft Azure”

This is not a techie query. I am just unclear on how to pronounce the word "Azure" which is the brand name for Microsoft's cloud computing service.
1
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0answers
97 views

Pronunciation of antifa?

I'm hearing all kinds of pronunciations for antifa : ən'ti:fə æn'ti:fə 'æntɪfɑ: æntɪ'fɑ: The word has recently become more prominent. Do fascists and antifascists say it in the same way? Any ...
2
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0answers
90 views

Is [ʌ] a back vowel or a central vowel in GA English?

The IPA symbol /ʌ/ name is "open-mid back unrounded vowel" and the IPA vowel trapezoid shows it as the unrounded version of /ɔ/, but its sound in English sounds very different from [ɔ] to me. It ...
1
vote
1answer
78 views

Is /ɑ/ a back or central vowel in GA English?

/ɑ/ is called open back unrounded vowel, however it appears in the center bottom of the vowel trapezoid of General American English at https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_American#Phonology . Why?...
2
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1answer
65 views

Is the letter “d” sometimes pronounced like a glottal stop?

Is the letter "d" sometimes pronounced like a glottal stop? For example is the letter "d" in the word "wouldn't" pronounced like a glottal stop?
0
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1answer
13k views

Mischievous pronounced [mis-CHEEV-ee-us] (mischievious) [closed]

I've heard some people pronounce "mischievous" as "mischievious" [mis-CHEEV-ee-us] with an I between the V and the O. The word has three syllables: [MIS-chiv-us]. Why do some people pronounce this ...
0
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1answer
2k views

Is an acronym always pronounced as a single word? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Difference between an acronym and abbreviation? Can a word that sounds the same as the way it is spelt be an initialism and an acronym? With reference to this question ...
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2answers
2k views

How do I pronounce my surname?

I am not a native English Speaker, but I work with English speakers on a daily basis and they have always troubles pronouncing my surname, so they will often ask me to tell them how they can pronounce ...
10
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4answers
3k views

Spicket or spigot?

I recently was making a list and for the first time using a digital device, typed in what I grew up referring to an outdoor faucet 'spicket' as into my iPad. My mother grew up in Utah and my father ...
5
votes
5answers
17k views

Pronunciation of foreign words in American vs. British English?

One of the differences between modern US English (hereafter referred to as "American English") and British English is the way in which we pronounce foreign words, particularly those of French origin ...
2
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0answers
52 views

Pronunciation of Los Angeles with /g/ and not /dʒ/, /lɒs'æŋgələs/ as opposed to /lɒs'ændʒələs/

I remember reading in an early Michael Connelly novel from the late nineties a remark about how one of the characters pronounced Los Angeles with a /g/ sound, making it /lɒs'æŋgələs/. So far as I ...
0
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0answers
31 views

Pronunciation of the word antisemitic [duplicate]

There seems to be two ways to pronounce antisemitic. I have always pronounced the syllable "sem" to rhyme with "them". I notice that many Americans make it rhyme with "him" and the following syllable "...
2
votes
1answer
80 views

On the velar nasal /ŋ/ sound followed by /k/

I'm a non-native speaker and I have always pronounced all words with syllables ending in 'n' followed by a /k/ sound with the velar nasal /ŋ/. For example: think / increase (v+n) / income / ...
0
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0answers
26 views

'Direction' Pronunciation [duplicate]

There are two ways to pronounce the word 'direction'. dɪˈrɛkʃ(ə)n and dʌɪˈrɛkʃ(ə)n Is one American and one British? If yes, please confirm which is which. If not, what's the difference in usage?
8
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2answers
570 views

Why is Indian English usually rhotic?

It seems that speakers of Indian English generally speak with a rhotic accent, pronouncing an [r] in all cases where spelled, whereas a speaker of British English would leave it off in postvocalic ...
-2
votes
2answers
66 views

What is it saying? [closed]

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1kUhRiycleuqZOHp2kxiY4AU22fZKS_t1/view?usp=sharing After "bunch of people", what does it sound like? What's the way for me to fully understand what it's said? I can ...
5
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1answer
337 views

How do you pronounce the letter “t” before “h”?

How do you pronounce the letter "t" before "h"? For example how do you pronounce "What happened?"? Is it like "whadappened?"
0
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0answers
47 views

How do you pronounce the word “married”? [duplicate]

How do you pronounce the word "married"? Why do most people pronounce it like "mɛrid" or "mɛərid" even though IPA for it is "mærid"?
1
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3answers
215 views

Are the 'esk' sound in grotesque and burlesque pronounced the same?

I'm watching episode 4, season 4 of Friends titled 'The One With The Embryos'. In this scene, Ross is testing Chandler and Joey against Monica and Rachel to see which team knows each other better. At ...
2
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0answers
105 views

“Sixty tray, all day” — what does that mean?

I've stumbled upon a very peculiar phrase in a comic I'm currently reading; here's the screenshot. As can be seen, just before exiting the train some gangsta guy quips "Sixty tray, all day" to a ...
2
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2answers
860 views

Does everyone in the U.S. (and beyond?) pronounce “Buick” with the Spanish B/V, or is this a regional thing?

There's a long and dry story to this, so I'll just get to the point and ask the question: Does everyone in the U.S. (and beyond?) pronounce the beginnng of the word "Buick" with the "Spanish" ...
0
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2answers
138 views

Why is there a word for 'H'? [duplicate]

Why is there a word for the letter H, but not for the other letters? In Lexico–formerly Oxford Dictionaries–for example, H = aitch, as in ‘drop one's aitches’
10
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1answer
2k views

Why do American speakers pronounce “the” as “/ðə/” before vowels?

I learned that we have to pronounce /ðə/ before consonants & /ði/ before vowels. For example, the /ðə/ car, but the /ði/ earth. But it seems that a lot of American people pronounce the /ðə/ ...
6
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2answers
32k views

What's the rule for pronouncing “’s” as /z/ or /s/?

Is there a hard rule for what sound the 's makes? In words like John's, Dave's, man's, lord's, etc. it makes a /z/ sound, but in words like that's, it's, ship's, poet's, etc., it makes an /s/ sound.
1
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2answers
78 views

Transcription and pronunciation of the 'un-' prefix in General American English

What's the correct transcription and pronunciation of the 'un-' prefix in General American English? Cambridge Online dictionary provides the following transcription: /ʌn/ It's the same in words with ...
0
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4answers
3k views

“Stephen” is now “Stefan” not “Steven”? [closed]

(Yes my name is Stephen) Over the last few years, I've noticed almost everyone pronounces "Stephen" not as "Steven", but as "Stefan". Before about 2012, I very rarely heard "Stephen" pronounced "...
4
votes
0answers
221 views

Trump's pronunciation of “origins” as “oringes”

President Trump pronounced the word origins [ˈɔ:rɪʤɪnz] as oringes [ˈɔ:rɪnʤəz] in a meeting with NATO secretary general Stoltenberg at the White House on 3 April 2019. See this clip on Youtube. ...
1
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1answer
84 views

This question is the BEST-uh!

Is there a name for the extra “uh” syllable that is sometimes added as emphasis on the end of words? From looking for examples this is an extra schwa syllable added to words. From further searching it ...
0
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1answer
76 views

Pronunciation of the phonetic symbol /ʌ/

The phonetics of the word consultant is /kənˈsʌltənt/. My ears heard the part /ʌl/ is exactly the same as the word so /soʊ/. So the question is that both /ʌl/ and /oʊ/ are the same pronunciation, isn'...
9
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2answers
2k views

What's the right way to pronounce “why”?

My native language is Portuguese (Brazil), and I've been noticing in the past few weeks that I may not know how to speak "why" correctly. I've always pronounced it as "uai", but suddenly in every TV ...
2
votes
2answers
156 views

Vowels in “physical” and “fizzy”

Recently in GermanLanguage.SE, somebody who tried to explain how to pronounce the German vowel "ü" claimed that some speakers of English may use a slightly rounded vowel in Greek loan words like "...
8
votes
5answers
12k views

Differing pronunciations of “divisive”

I've always pronounced it dɪˈvaɪsɪv (rhymes with incisive). Today at his press conference, President Obama pronounced it dɪˈvɪsɪv (rhymes with dismissive). I've heard the latter pronunciation off ...
2
votes
1answer
107 views

When did it become fashionable to drop t's in certain words?

I first noticed certain video bloggers pronouncing button as "BUH-ehn", with a distinct glottal stop between syllables, sounding like an overt attempt to avoid enunciating the "t". While button is the ...
2
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1answer
145 views

Why do some Americans pronounce K and B after vowels sounds like G and P

For example, ‘speaker’ sounds like ‘speager’ and ‘Stop it’ sounds like ‘stob it’.
1
vote
1answer
64 views

What is the rule that causes the -ti in rectilinear to be pronounced with a short i?

So, I have always pronounced rectilinear with a long i sound (recteelinear), until the other day when, much to my embarrassment, I heard it pronounced with a short i (rectuhlinear). How would I ...
1
vote
1answer
485 views

What is the /ū/ sound in English symbol?

In the American Accent Training, it shows /ū/ (a line over u) is a tense vowel, and takes "smooth" as an example. However, according to Merriam-Webster dictionary, it should be [ˈsmüt͟h], and there ...
16
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9answers
22k views

In what dialects does “often” rhyme with “soften”?

I believe in most English dialects soften is pronounced without a t sound. In some dialects, often is similar, but in others a t sound is quite evident in often. I'm interested not only in which ...
4
votes
1answer
81 views

Was it ever standard to pronounce “malinger” to rhyme with “ginger”?

In The Pronunciation of Standard English in America, by George Philip Krapp (1919), I found the following surprising statement: For malinger the standard pronunciation is [mə´lɪndʒə̉ɹ], though ...
0
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2answers
1k views

Does John Fogerty Talk Southern?

What is it that makes people think, erroneously, that Creedence Clearwater Revival are from the South? Is it something in the way the singer John Fogerty pronounces? In fact he's from California and ...
1
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0answers
27 views

Resource for complex pronunciation queries

I haven't seen any questions about resources so I'm not sure if it's accepted but let's try anyway. I recently learned that the word quay is pronounced /ˈkiː/. I was wondering if there are other ...
1
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0answers
24 views

(n-1)st/th: n minus oneth or first? [duplicate]

Should I write (n-1)th or (n-1)st Relatedly, is it "n minus oneth" or "n minus first". Thanks!
1
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0answers
60 views

Elision of “it” and “what” at the beginning of sentences

I am reading American Accent Training. I find sometimes either 'it' or 'what' at the beginning is omitted. e.g. It's in the bag. [tsinə bag] What's in it. (Though labeled [w'ts ..] I only ...
5
votes
4answers
2k views

How to pronounce “r” after a “g”?

I can pronounce the english "r" properly in most words but it sounds closer to a "w" when it follows a "g" and sometimes "k" sound. The words that are the most problematic for me are agree and agreed. ...
15
votes
3answers
29k views

Pronunciation of “Blessed”

Is there any difference in meaning or usage when pronouncing "blessed" with two syllables rather than one syllable? Two: bles-id [blɛsəd] One: blest [blɛst]
0
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1answer
36 views

unvoiced /th/ and /f/,Jennifer Rush Power Of Love

I know this is a question asked by many times.I also know unvoiced /th/ should never be pronounced as /f/. But in this video youtube/watch?v=G-gfBBOqBJM Jennifer Rush - The Power Of Love 1985 among ...
0
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1answer
505 views

What's the difference between the AA (ɑ) and AO (ɔ) sound?

I'm working with the CMU pronunciation dictionary and I can't comfortably say I can understand what difference in sound they're trying to indicate by splitting AA and AO into different phonemes. ...