Questions tagged [pronunciation]

for questions about the sound, stress, or intonation of spoken words.

120 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
4
votes
1answer
569 views

Are differing pronunciations of “second” a regional difference?

According to Wiktionary the word "second" can be pronounced one of two ways in the US: /ˈsɛk.(ə)nd/ and /ˈsɛk.(ə)nt/ I've googled to try to find anything about the difference between these ...
3
votes
0answers
100 views

The origins of the North American glottalised stop in place of certain consonant groups

In some North American speech (not sure about Canada;), I have long noted the pronunciation of certain consonant combinations that seem to have drifted to what sounds like some form of glottalised ...
3
votes
0answers
347 views

The pronunciation of the definite article by American speakers

I was reading an article the other day and I came across an interesting passage: Notice that the weak form of the is typically [ði] before a vowel-initial word (the apple) but [ðə] before a ...
3
votes
2answers
134 views

What is the history behind how date is read?

I was trying to find out if there were reading guidelines for dates, e.g., for broadcasting or competitive recitation. There seem to be a few different accepted ways of reading out dates, e.g., 1, or ...
3
votes
2answers
530 views

Why do some Americans pronounce K and B after vowels sounds like G and P

For example, ‘speaker’ sounds like ‘speager’ and ‘Stop it’ sounds like ‘stob it’.
3
votes
2answers
253 views

Van Gogh goes or Van Gogh coughs? Is there a commonly accepted British English pronunciation?

The question changed during the formulation from What is the correct 'British English' pronunciation of Van Gogh? to Is there such a thing as a 'correct' English pronunciation of a Dutch ...
2
votes
3answers
91 views

Dilemma of pronunciation

As a non-native speaker of English, I am often confused about pronouncing words. Is there any standard of pronunciation in the English language? As in, if I give a completely new word to some random ...
2
votes
0answers
38 views

rhotic sound in received pronunciation?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcaWkR4ydeY Hi, This is a British pronunciation according to the title. I can hear a rhotic /ɝ/ in the second syllable, however. In the pronunciation of this word, ...
2
votes
0answers
117 views

Why do some speakers pronounce the aɪ sound as ɔɪ?

Essentially, I'm referring to how some British English speakers pronounce words like "time", "right". That first vowel changes and ends up sounding like "toyme" or "royght". Americans seem to have ...
2
votes
0answers
410 views

Daniel Craig's accent in Knives Out trailer (Southern, RP, different?)

What is his accent in this trailer? https://youtu.be/sL-9Khv7wa4?t=71 https://youtu.be/sL-9Khv7wa4?t=86 Would you call it Southern? I'd say it's a mix of RP and Southern at best. He seems to have ...
2
votes
0answers
170 views

Is [ʌ] a back vowel or a central vowel in GA English?

The IPA symbol /ʌ/ name is "open-mid back unrounded vowel" and the IPA vowel trapezoid shows it as the unrounded version of /ɔ/, but its sound in English sounds very different from [ɔ] to me. It ...
2
votes
0answers
72 views

Vowel shift in Michigan accent?

I’ve spent a fair amount of time in Michigan because my grandparents live there. By today’s standards, they have very heavy accents, with full Canadian raising and the northern cities vowel shift. ...
2
votes
0answers
529 views

“solder” and “salve” phonetics between AmE and BrE

Many will know that there are differences in AmE and BrE pronunciation of the words "solder" and "salve". On the topic of "solder", there are already two questions here asking about the correct ...
2
votes
0answers
258 views

caught-cot merger: can “lawyer” sound like “lier”?

"law" is pronounced as /lɑ/ if you speak with the caught-cot merger, so, logic suggests "lawyer" should sound like /lɑjɚ/, as "lawyer" is basically "law" + "yer" For me, the difference between /lɑjɚ/ ...
2
votes
0answers
505 views

The AIR and EAR Sounds

The one thing that confuses me the most are the AIR and EAR sounds as in AmERica and ExpERiment. What exactly is the AIR/EAR sound? The AIR sound is basically a short E or a long A sound controlled ...
2
votes
0answers
102 views

Where can I find OED articles on various phonemes' pronunciation?

Dear ladies and gentlemen. I found myself in need of a detailed source of information regarding variants of pronouncing English sounds, and chanced upon this answer presented by tchrist several years ...
2
votes
0answers
1k views

How to calculate number of syllables in a word using only the IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet) spelling?

I want to write an algorithm to calculate the number of syllables in a word. This process is an automated one that will be run on an entire dictionary so manually counting the number of breaths, chin ...
2
votes
0answers
436 views

How widespread is the pronunciation of “Parmesan” as /ˈpɑɹ.məˌʒɑn/ instead of /ˈpɑɹ.məˌzɑn/?

The letter s in the word Parmesan (meaning the cheese, named after the Parma region of Italy) is pronounced quite widely (Br & Aus AFAIK) as a /z/, per Wiktionary: UK, also found in the US: /ˈpɑɹ....
2
votes
0answers
2k views

Is it more common for the noun “research” to be stressed on the first or second syllable among educated native speakers of American English?

Which of the two common pronunciations of the noun research is more common among educated native American English speakers? /rɪ ˈsɝt͡ʃ/ with the stress on the second syllable /ˈriː sɚt͡ʃ/ with the ...
2
votes
0answers
83 views

Is there always a difference between /ə(ɹ)z/ and /ɪz/?

Is there always a difference between the following two sounds: /ɪz/ as in the end of 'hedges' /ə(ɹ)z/ as in the end of 'ledgers' They seem super close. Is there any accent in which they sound the ...
2
votes
0answers
174 views

The perception of /ɑ/ and /a/

The Cambridge Dictionary transcription for the word barn is /bɑːrn/ If someone says this word as /baːrn/ (open front vowel), will this sound foreign to you? Will you notice at all? What will your ...
2
votes
0answers
585 views

The word “royal”

I noticed this because of the Youtube videos about the to-be-released Pokemon game. There is a new battling style called "Battle Royal" and in those videos they pronounce royal as "roi-aww," putting ...
2
votes
0answers
374 views

Is day-ta more common in the South or the North of the US?

So I've read that dah-ta is more common in the US than in other places, but is day-ta or dah-ta more common to hear in the South? I haven't been able to find that out for sure.
2
votes
0answers
373 views

vowel sound in “stair” pronounced similarly as the “eɪ” diphthong in “fake”?

Sometimes in words which have the ɛ sound followed by an "r" as in "stair", "their" "bear", "where" I hear them pronounced like "steɪəɹ", ðeɪəɹ etc. with the "eɪ" as in "fake", "lake","make" and not ...
2
votes
0answers
249 views

“hundred” and “pretty” pronounced respectively as [ˈhən-dərd] and [ˈpər-tē]

Merriam-Webster's A Pronouncing Dictionary of American English gives [ˈhən-dərd], [ˈpər-tē], [ˈtem-pə(r)-ˌchu̇r], [ˈse-kə(r)-ˌterē], etc., as alternate ways to pronounce "hundred," "pretty," "...
2
votes
0answers
104 views

Can the “t” letter be uttered as a flap t before the letter “h”?

I know the flap-t is usually used when the "t" is between vowels or between an "r" and a vowel, but I think I can also hear it betwenn vowels and the "h". And I noticed the same with the "g" I think. ...
2
votes
0answers
230 views

Is Lana's “Yup!” a triphthong?

At some point in the Archer series, Lana starts saying very emphatic Yup!s. I was recently wondering about triphthongs and whether they occur in English, and found the Wikipedia entry had only a few ...
2
votes
0answers
864 views

In which vowel do the diphthongs [aʊ] and [aɪ] start?

Surfing the web, I found the following explanations on how to produce the diphthongs [aʊ] and [aɪ]: "/aʊ/ as in all the words of "How now brown cow!". The starting position is the vowel sound /æ/ as ...
2
votes
0answers
2k views

Is effect pronounced as /ɪˈfekt/ or as /əˈfekt/?

This page ( https://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/american_english/effect ) lists it as /əˈfekt/ for American English, but when you click on the pronounce button it is pronounced as /ɪˈfekt/. ...
2
votes
0answers
585 views

Sentence stress and word linking with the problematic Y?

the question: Can I use your bathroom? phonetically looks like: [kə_naɪ ˈyuz yər ˈbæθˌrum] I think the stress should be on the verb USE and the noun BATHROOM. Am I right? Some dictionaries show the ...
2
votes
1answer
106 views

Lateral Release

I am a EFL learner who focuses on RP. I have a question about lateral release of plosives t and d. I know that the release of t and d can be done by lowering the side of the tongue when t and d are ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Why is J often used to represent a “Y” sound in Romanizations of other writing systems?

I am not referring to IPA. I am referring to examples in textbooks. For example, my Ukrainian textbook says that the letter Я is pronounced as "ja". Most native English speakers would pronounced this ...
1
vote
0answers
45 views

Middle English /t/ and /d/ pronunciation

Were "t"s and "d"s in Middle English realized as apical alveolar stops (tip of the tongue against the alveolar ridge, like in German) or as laminal alveolars/denti-alveolars (blade ...
1
vote
0answers
36 views

Is there any well-known British accent which aʊ is pronounced like əʊ in?

I think I've heard the word "about" pronounced with əʊ (as in "Poland"). Is it just me or there's indeed such an accent in Great Britain or, more specifically, in England?
1
vote
0answers
50 views

Enforce NOT to pronounce sh in a word

I have a word in the Arabic language that is transliterated into Mushib in English. It means Verbose. I need to enforce the pronunciation of this word to be Mus-Hib (Without pronouncing the sh sound) ...
1
vote
0answers
70 views

Is there a word that has the same -er sound pronunciation in all both British and American accents

Most words with -er ending, sound different in British and American accent. In British it’s “a”, in American it’s “e”(don’t know how to correctly write transcription ). But is there word, that has ...
1
vote
0answers
48 views

Is there a way to say capital letters?

Say when I'm reciting a password to someone I say something like: capital a b capital c d capital e Is there any way to pronounce upper case letters without having to say capital in front of the ...
1
vote
0answers
76 views

In my pronouns god me defend

The motto of the UK monarch is apparently not the same in all parts of the kingdom: In Scotland, it is: In My Defens God Me Defend Ok, but - how do I pronounce this? Is "defens" pronounced like ...
1
vote
0answers
72 views

My pronunciation of “ul” in pull, culture, multiple - a mid back rounded vowel?

I've puzzled over my pronunciation of "ul" in words like pull, culture, adult and multiple. The dictionary says it should be /ʌ/. I heard a Canadian teacher pronounce "culture" /'kol tʃɘr/. My ...
1
vote
0answers
83 views

The pronunciation of two consecutive O's

I came across such a sentence (‘Cakes and ale: or the skeleton in the cupboard’): She looked no older than when last I saw her six years before. And I stumbled over this ‘no older’ reading it ...
1
vote
0answers
107 views

Is there normally a lexicalized loss of phonemic /d/ in the coda of “depends”?

According to a blog article by Steven Norman under the title “My 100 most mispronounced words in English”, the word depends should be /dɪˈpenz/ when “correctly” pronounced. Notice he provides for no ...
1
vote
0answers
64 views

/dʒ/ sound in engineer and job

Why /dʒ/ sound in engineer and job is so different. The example for engineer, its sound likely /ʒ/ than /dʒ/ https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/engineer The example for job https:...
1
vote
0answers
59 views

Do American natives pronounce t of at in “at any …” as FLAP T?

According to the American Accent rules, any T is pronounced as FLAP T when it comes in between two vowels that may be in a word or in between two words like "at any".... So, Do American natives ...
1
vote
0answers
84 views

Pronunciation of /b/ before /t/ as in 'obtain'

According to dictionaries, there is a sound /b/ before /t/ in the word 'obtain': /əbˈteɪn/. To me it seems impossible to pronounce /b/ in this position. To my ear obtain sounds as /əpˈteɪn/ where /p/ ...
1
vote
0answers
251 views

A learned scholar and the pronunciation of learned

Source: Cambridge Dictionary learned adjective fml US ​ /ˈlɜr·nɪd/ having or showing much knowledge: a learned scholar I was checking the word learned and the example sentence made me wonder if ...
1
vote
0answers
125 views

How to pronounce the '/100 km'?

Hi, there! When we describe the fuel consumption, how should we pronounce the '/100km'? e.g: This car has a fuel consumption of 100 gal/100km. Is it pronounced as 'per one hundred kilometers' or '...
1
vote
0answers
179 views

Pronunciation of antifa?

I'm hearing all kinds of pronunciations for antifa : ən'ti:fə æn'ti:fə 'æntɪfɑ: æntɪ'fɑ: The word has recently become more prominent. Do fascists and antifascists say it in the same way? Any ...
1
vote
0answers
33 views

Resource for complex pronunciation queries

I haven't seen any questions about resources so I'm not sure if it's accepted but let's try anyway. I recently learned that the word quay is pronounced /ˈkiː/. I was wondering if there are other ...
1
vote
0answers
63 views

Elision of “it” and “what” at the beginning of sentences

I am reading American Accent Training. I find sometimes either 'it' or 'what' at the beginning is omitted. e.g. It's in the bag. [tsinə bag] What's in it. (Though labeled [w'ts ..] I only hear [tsini]...
1
vote
0answers
104 views

How should you pronounce the word “wolf ”?

If the dictionary’s IPA for the word wolf is /wʊlf/, then why do I sometimes hear people pronounce it /wolf/ instead of /wʊlf/? Aren’t /ʊ/ and /o/ different phonemes?