Questions tagged [pronunciation]

for questions about the sound, stress, or intonation of spoken words.

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1answer
57 views

Texans speaking with a slurring “s”?

Some Texans speak with slurring "s" sounds, sometimes making a soft rasp or even a "sh" sound? example "Shtudent" instead of "student". Is this traditional or a new affectation?
2
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1answer
92 views

What's the first vowel of Boston, MA?

The Wikipedia article on Boston states that the first vowel in the name of the city is that of "caught," not "cot," citing Longman Pronunciation Dictionary. This seems consistent with my own ...
16
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2answers
4k views

Is this the correct pronunciation of “heinous” in any English-speaking country?

I've never heard "heinous" pronounced "HI-ness" before; I always thought the only valid pronunciation was "HAY-ness." Is "HI-ness" a valid pronunciation of "heinous" in any English-speaking country? ...
0
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1answer
41 views

The usage of article 'an' in the following case [duplicate]

It is common to use 1a an historical event 2a an hotel rather than 1b a historical event 2b a hotel Why 'an' is used in such case?
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1answer
65 views

Pronunciation of “the” in “the US” [duplicate]

How come I often hear native speakers say "the (/ðiː/) US" as if "US" started with a vowel? It starts with a consonant /j/, right? Or are they using a strong form of "the"? Thank you.
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0answers
48 views

Do people pronounce “coming” with an [ɔː] sound in South West England?

In the "Skins" series, which are set in Bristol, I've heard the word "coming" pronounced with something close to an [ɔː] sound. Is this a common usage in South West England? Wikipedia says "a terminal ...
0
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1answer
69 views

Number of syllables. Nuclear vs Linear. Is there a difference

I just looked up the syllable description of the words linear and nuclear. On that website, it says linear has 3 syllables and nuclear 2. This is despite the 'ear' of both words being pronounced the ...
17
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2answers
2k views

Is there such a thing as Intrusive-L (as opposed to Intrusive-R)?

Most of us have heard plenty of examples of the so-called Intrusive-R. It is a feature of non-rhotic dialects, including British RP and some New England dialects. It occurs between two vowels that are ...
-4
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0answers
51 views

Why do we pronounce -e in Japanese names?

I have always notice through watching anime and broadcasts in this field that people always pronounce the -e at the end of the Japanese names'. Is there a rule or something? Thanks,
1
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1answer
66 views

Dialectical differences in pronunciation of the 't' sound in “it”, “its”, and “it's”?

There are many cases where different words are pronounced differently in some English dialects, but not others. A commonly cited example is -- Mary, marry, and merry. In English, the letter 't' may ...
0
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1answer
87 views

Keeping the spelling 'Kristtorn' while sounding like 'Kriston' - possible with diacritics?

I want to change my name to Kristtorn, which, when pronounced in English, sounds like 'orn' as in horn (/ɔːn/), but I want to make it sound like 'kriston' (/krɪstɒn/). However what I am wondering is ...
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1answer
34 views

Is the repetition of a pronoun instead of stressing it possible?

In English it is usual to stress a personal pronoun or a noun so as to introduce a departure from the preceding spell of conversation in which is mentioned another agent in relation to the same ...
0
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0answers
48 views

“in the” reduced pronunciation

In some american TV shows, it seems that "in the" is sometimes reduced in informal speech. For example, "in the paper", I don't hear the [θ] sound, it seems more like [ɪn ʔə]. Is it the case ? If not, ...
2
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1answer
78 views

Lateral Release

I am a EFL learner who focuses on RP. I have a question about lateral release of plosives t and d. I know that the release of t and d can be done by lowering the side of the tongue when t and d are ...
-1
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1answer
111 views

American vs British pronunciation in a word: “run”, how should that be pronounced?

As far as I know, words like run or under (letter: "u") are pronounced as: British: /rʌn/ American: /rən/ with the schwa sound The above is according to the page: A Key To English Pronunciations — ...
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0answers
70 views

In my pronouns god me defend

The motto of the UK monarch is apparently not the same in all parts of the kingdom: In Scotland, it is: In My Defens God Me Defend Ok, but - how do I pronounce this? Is "defens" pronounced like ...
1
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0answers
62 views

My pronunciation of “ul” in pull, culture, multiple - a mid back rounded vowel?

I've puzzled over my pronunciation of "ul" in words like pull, culture, adult and multiple. The dictionary says it should be /ʌ/. I heard a Canadian teacher pronounce "culture" /'kol tʃɘr/. My ...
0
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1answer
72 views

Should it be 'an' or 'a' in front of an abbreviation? [duplicate]

I am using abbreviations for well-known phrases: e.g., "Nash equilibrium" becomes NE and "neural networks" becomes NN. Should I use "an NN" or "a NN"? Does it matter whether a reader "unfolds" the ...
2
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2answers
97 views

What is the history behind how date is read?

I was trying to find out if there were reading guidelines for dates, e.g., for broadcasting or competitive recitation. There seem to be a few different accepted ways of reading out dates, e.g., 1, or ...
0
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0answers
45 views

What are the constraints on people adding 's or -es when pronouncing brand names

People sometimes add an 's (I can't be bothered with the IPA, but you know what I mean) when pronouncing brand names. Let's be even more specific and narrow it down to names of shops. Example: ...
0
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2answers
92 views

Point vs dot: when to use what?

I would like to know how the punctuation in the following would be spoken when dictating letter by letter. Although there are already some partial answers to the question when to say “point” and when ...
-1
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1answer
75 views

Should the first instance of an author-made word in a work use an accent mark? [closed]

If an author makes up proper nouns for their text, for example, Bilgebauth, should the very first instance in the text be typeset with an accent: Bilgebáuth to inform the reader of the proper stress ...
2
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1answer
120 views

Pronunciation of “rather”

In this YouTube video around 7:02 the author says: [...] rather is one of those words which can have a different meaning [...] depending on how you pronounce it. This got me interested and I ...
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0answers
73 views

The pronunciation of two consecutive O's

I came across such a sentence (‘Cakes and ale: or the skeleton in the cupboard’): She looked no older than when last I saw her six years before. And I stumbled over this ‘no older’ reading it ...
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1answer
60 views

“News that matter” or “News that matters”? [closed]

I would like to ask which one is correct. This is for a slogan. I just cannot seem to understand which is the right one to use and why. Both sound fine to me, albeit the first one sounds better.
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2answers
222 views

Do /ɪə/, /eə/, /ʊə/ diphthongs actually exist in General American as phonemes?

The Handbook of English Pronunciation. (Marnie Reed, John Levis referring to J.C. Wells) Аs the pronunciation of most speakers is rhotic, there are no centring diphthongs, because the vowels /ɪə,...
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3answers
2k views

Making the sound of 'th' in 'with'

What is the sound of TH in the word WITH? Is it made with the upper teeth in the bottom lips, or with the tongue between them? Is there any source of why there are such differences with this pair ...
4
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2answers
161 views

Why do Americans pronounce “Noo York” the way they do? [duplicate]

I'm wondering if there is a historical explanation as to why the New in "New York" is pronounced /nu/ (as in "Noodles") rather than /nju/ (as in RP "New Year"). Has this always been the case? Or did ...
0
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1answer
72 views

pronunciation of climbing

I just heard on the following SNL skits, entitled "Mid-Day News" from the October 5, 2019 episode hosted by Phoebe Waller-Bridge: https://youtu.be/NGqtZmShIkw?t=254 and https://youtu.be/NGqtZmShIkw?...
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1answer
44 views

Will you grab - we'you grab [closed]

I was watching a film with subtitles, and the phrase: "Will you grab her blanket?" sounded like "We'you graber blanket". I'm Ok with "graber", but can we drop "l"-sound in "will you"?
4
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1answer
174 views

How do you pronounce a D at the end of a word followed by a word starting with D?

Read these sentences? "The red door." "The blind date." "The mad dog." I would pronounce these as "The reddoor." and the "blinddate". Sort of pausing in the middle of the d with tongue pressed ...
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0answers
49 views

Is it common to pause in the center of a word? why do people do that?

It sounds the man saying what you're about to see is the story of a young man whose name is Ben Underwood. when he was born at an early age he had cancer in both eyes and they had to be ...
0
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0answers
66 views

What is the correct pronunciation for “forever”?

What is the correct pronunciation for the word "forever"? In this video I found it sounds like /fəˈevər/ but in dictionaries it is /fəˈrevər/. I believe there are many other examples like this word, ...
0
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1answer
83 views

Pronunciation of “Makemake” versus “make”

"Makemake" is the name of a celestial object, a dwarf planet. The "i" in name "Makemake" is pronounced different than in the English word "make" meaning create*. It is pronounced as in "maki", the ...
0
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1answer
65 views

When reading an English sentence containing a word with foreign origin, should one try to read it with pronounciation from the original language? [duplicate]

Say I am reading the following sentence: Tokyo has served as the Japanese capital since 1869. For the word Tokyo, if I happen to know how to pronounce it in Japanese (the pronunciation is similar ...
0
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2answers
83 views

“margin” - pronunciation [closed]

I've just been corrected by one of my friends when I pronounced "margin" as /ˈmɑːɡɪn/. Indeed, I looked it up and dictionaries only give /ˈmɑːdʒɪn/. Does anybody really pronounce it the way I did it? ...
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0answers
85 views

Is there normally a lexicalized loss of phonemic /d/ in the coda of “depends”?

According to a blog article by Steven Norman under the title “My 100 most mispronounced words in English”, the word depends should be /dɪˈpenz/ when “correctly” pronounced. Notice he provides for no ...
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0answers
42 views

Is forte pronounced “fort” or “for-tay”? [duplicate]

How do you pronounce forte? Fort or for-tay?
0
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2answers
116 views

pronunciation of versus or vs [closed]

I'm not a native speaker of English and I'm always interested in issues of pronunciation. The Longman Pronunciation Dictionary, compiled by phonetician J. C. Wells, has only one possible ...
35
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2answers
10k views

Why would “an mule” be used instead of “a mule”? [closed]

As generally agreed and as extensively discussed in this question, "an" should be used in place of the more common "a" where the following word begins with a vowel sound. I have just encountered for ...
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0answers
27 views

Why do words that begin with the letters “DE” have different ways of pronouncing? [duplicate]

Why do words that begin with the letters "DE" have different ways of pronouncing? Example: decide(dɪˈsaɪd) and decoy(diː.kɔɪ) Does the english language has some sort of rule to help with this?
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1answer
57 views
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1answer
81 views

Which dialect of English do people pronounce advertisement as ad-VER-tis-ment

I recently listened to an audio book in which the narrator had pronounced advertisement as ad-VER-tis-ment, and thought this was a strange way of pronouncing it, so I'm curious to know in which part ...
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0answers
55 views

How do I pronounce intervals like “ x_1, x_2, x_3” written using subscripts?

I use eccentric notation. I have equations dealing with many sets of variables. I have 2 x's and 2 y's. x1 is a different base than x2, like when you have two separate functions with two sets of y/x ...
1
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1answer
140 views

“already” pronounced as [ˈɔʋɪ]

What is the pronunciation of already in the song Without Me by Halsey? What phonological processes take place resulting in such a pronunciation? (min 3:03) https://youtu.be/ZAfAud_M_mg?t=183
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0answers
62 views

/dʒ/ sound in engineer and job

Why /dʒ/ sound in engineer and job is so different. The example for engineer, its sound likely /ʒ/ than /dʒ/ https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/engineer The example for job https:...
1
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1answer
89 views

When you make a glottal stop in English, does the front of your tongue touch the roof of your mouth?

When you make a glottal stop (or a glottalized t/stop t) in English, does the front of your tongue touch the roof of your mouth? For example, the word "hit".
4
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1answer
706 views

Was 'help' pronounced starting with a vowel sound?

In The King James Bible, Genesis: 2:20 And Adam gave names to all cattle, and to the fowl of the air, and to every beast of the field; but for Adam there was not found an help meet for him. I have ...
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1answer
107 views

When pronunciation does not follow etymology [closed]

Autophagy is defined as: Biology: Consumption of the body’s own tissue as a metabolic process occurring in starvation and certain diseases. lexico.com It also provides a pronunciation: /...
3
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1answer
182 views

Van Gogh goes or Van Gogh coughs? Is there a commonly accepted British English pronunciation?

The question changed during the formulation from What is the correct 'British English' pronunciation of Van Gogh? to Is there such a thing as a 'correct' English pronunciation of a Dutch ...