Questions tagged [pronunciation]

for questions about the sound, stress, or intonation of spoken words.

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86 views

The origins of the North American glottalised stop in place of certain consonant groups

In some North American speech (not sure about Canada;), I have long noted the pronunciation of certain consonant combinations that seem to have drifted to what sounds like some form of glottalised ...
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74 views

Is there always a difference between /ə(ɹ)z/ and /ɪz/?

Is there always a difference between the following two sounds: /ɪz/ as in the end of 'hedges' /ə(ɹ)z/ as in the end of 'ledgers' They seem super close. Is there any accent in which they sound the ...
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152 views

The perception of /ɑ/ and /a/

The Cambridge Dictionary transcription for the word barn is /bɑːrn/ If someone says this word as /baːrn/ (open front vowel), will this sound foreign to you? Will you notice at all? What will your ...
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189 views

Do native English speakers always stress content words rather than the final important word of a sentence?

I’ve watched lots of videos and read lots of articles that talk about this subject. However, I couldn’t understand because almost every article says something either new or different. So, I’d love to ...
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157 views

How do we get pronunciation Yoost to?

In this thread How does the phrase "used to" work, grammatically? the construct "used to" is discussed but there is no mention of its pronunciation. Here (Canada) the "used" in this phrase ...
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504 views

The word “royal”

I noticed this because of the Youtube videos about the to-be-released Pokemon game. There is a new battling style called "Battle Royal" and in those videos they pronounce royal as "roi-aww," putting ...
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281 views

Pronunciation difference between “Mayonnaise” & “Vase”

I've seen quite many people pronounce "Mayonnaise" with "-s" at the end, although its phonetic alphabet is written as '/meɪəneɪz/'. So at first I thought /eɪ/ + s could be versatile as /eɪs/ or /eɪz/, ...
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287 views

Is day-ta more common in the South or the North of the US?

So I've read that dah-ta is more common in the US than in other places, but is day-ta or dah-ta more common to hear in the South? I haven't been able to find that out for sure.
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280 views

vowel sound in “stair” pronounced similarly as the “eɪ” diphthong in “fake”?

Sometimes in words which have the ɛ sound followed by an "r" as in "stair", "their" "bear", "where" I hear them pronounced like "steɪəɹ", ðeɪəɹ etc. with the "eɪ" as in "fake", "lake","make" and not ...
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227 views

“hundred” and “pretty” pronounced respectively as [ˈhən-dərd] and [ˈpər-tē]

Merriam-Webster's A Pronouncing Dictionary of American English gives [ˈhən-dərd], [ˈpər-tē], [ˈtem-pə(r)-ˌchu̇r], [ˈse-kə(r)-ˌterē], etc., as alternate ways to pronounce "hundred," "pretty," "...
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96 views

Can the “t” letter be uttered as a flap t before the letter “h”?

I know the flap-t is usually used when the "t" is between vowels or between an "r" and a vowel, but I think I can also hear it betwenn vowels and the "h". And I noticed the same with the "g" I think. ...
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2k views

Could you Clarify the Front - Back & Close - Open position & other positions in between in IPA vowel chart?

See the IPA vowel chart A front vowel is any in a class of vowel sound used in some spoken languages. The defining characteristic of a front vowel is that the tongue is positioned as far in ...
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212 views

Words that are spoken one way but written another

I was recently involved in answering this question: Renumeration vs Remuneration (reimbursed financially), which is correct? Which asks whether "renumeration" or "remuneration" is correct in terms ...
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178 views

Is Lana's “Yup!” a triphthong?

At some point in the Archer series, Lana starts saying very emphatic Yup!s. I was recently wondering about triphthongs and whether they occur in English, and found the Wikipedia entry had only a few ...
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302 views

The pronunciation of the definite article by American speakers

I was reading an article the other day and I came across an interesting passage: Notice that the weak form of the is typically [ði] before a vowel-initial word (the apple) but [ðə] before a ...
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1k views

Is effect pronounced as /ɪˈfekt/ or as /əˈfekt/?

This page ( https://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/american_english/effect ) lists it as /əˈfekt/ for American English, but when you click on the pronounce button it is pronounced as /ɪˈfekt/. ...
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368 views

Exaggerating the pronunciation of a vowel or consonant

Is there a word for exaggerating the pronunciation of a vowel or consonant by holding it longer than normal? When conveying this in writing, does it fall in the same category as an accent or dialect (...
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251 views

Pronunciation of Who is it?

I heard the question "Who is it?" in a movie. [Person A] knocked on a door. [Person B] came to open the door, but before that he asks "Who is it?" This three syllables question can be pronounced ...
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1answer
637 views

The aspiration on “wh” words

Is it correct to pronounce all "wh" words with the aspiration? I am referring to the words like "what", "when", "where", which are normally not aspirated when said. And if so, is it more prestigious ...
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1answer
210 views

Pronunciation of the word “helmet”

Which pronunciation is correct? If both, which one is used more commonly? /ˈhelmɪt/ or /ˈhelmət/
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2answers
55 views

Apostrophe instead of the first sound. Where do I read about it?

What sources are there about rules for such contractions in American English when the first sound of the word isn’t pronounced. There’s an apostrophe or something like this instead. F/e, the ...
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34 views

Derivative form that simplifies or localizes pronunciation

Americans sometimes say boozhy, which I am guessing was coined to simplify the pronunciation of its original, foreign form: bourgeois. There are probably other examples of the same derivative ...
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22 views

When the word “our” is unstressed, is it pronounced like /ʌɹ/ or /əɹ/?

When the word "our" is unstressed, is it pronounced like /ʌɹ/ or /əɹ/? For example: https://vocaroo.com/i/s0uXE3Gaahqm
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22 views

When the word “while” is unstressed is it pronounced like “wəl”, “wʌl” or “wɑl”?

When the word "while" is unstressed is it pronounced like "wəl", "wʌl" or "wɑl"? https://vocaroo.com/i/s0ksGbGNUfyW
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26 views

When the word “want” is unstressed, is it pronounced like /wənt/ or /wʌnt/?

When the word "want" is unstressed, is it pronounced like /wənt/ or /wʌnt/? https://vocaroo.com/i/s1nUhAfWsc9k
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44 views

Variations in pronouncing “beloved” and other words ending in “-ed”

I have usually pronounced beloved with three syllables as "BE-lu-ved", but I have also heard it pronounced "be-loved" with only two syllables. I grew up on west coast, but now live in the south, where ...
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56 views

Is there a rule? The pronunciation of a word changes if the following word is a vowel sound or a constant sound?

I use "eye-ther" before words beginning with a consonant sound and "ee-ther" before words beginning with a vowel sound. The same applies when I use neither. E.g. "eye-ther this or that", "eye-ther him ...
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48 views

Areas where the residents pronounce their locations differently than non-residents

When listening to residents of Baltimore Maryland say the name of their city, they drop the "t" altogether and the name of their city is pronounced with 2 syllables. It sounds more like: "Bal-mer". ...
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50 views

Are “one” and “won” homophones in Australian English?

My friend and I are both native speakers of Australian English. He thinks "one" and "won" sound different and feels "a one-liner" sounds wrong and should be "an one-liner". He does think the two ...
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1answer
53 views

British / American poetry appreciation

Do native poetry enthusiast pay attention to British vs. American pronunciation when enjoying poetry? As I understand, there could be differences in rhythm and rhyme depending on the given accent, ...
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1answer
513 views

What's the difference between the AA (ɑ) and AO (ɔ) sound?

I'm working with the CMU pronunciation dictionary and I can't comfortably say I can understand what difference in sound they're trying to indicate by splitting AA and AO into different phonemes. ...
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2answers
85 views

Determining the stressed word in a sentence when using possessive

In the following sentence, which word should receive the stress: This is the dog’s collar. I fully understand that in different contexts, different words will be stressed. But I’m asking about the ...
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61 views

Was upon ever pronounced like up-on?

Apparently, the word upon has its origin in the words up and on. Since I recently heard a non-native speaker pronounce upon as ['ʌpɒn], I would like to know if there is any record regarding the ...
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62 views

What kind of English that the narration of the starting part of A.I. movie?

I'm watching the A.I. Artificial Intelligence. And I just realized that the pronunciation and intonation is special. The pronunciation is very strict. Hear the part .. economic link the c ends with k ...
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79 views

Is the 'au' phoneme on the decline?

I live in the midwest, grew up in Chicago. Here, altho there is usually a clear distinction between au like in 'auditorium' and o like in 'on', the 2 are often used interchangeably in ordinary ...
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297 views

Are both “How did you” and “Howdja” used?

How did you get here? [ 'haʊ dɪdʒʊ 'gɛt hɪər? ] I took the bus. How did you get here? [ 'haʊdʒə 'gɛt hɪər? ] I took the train. My question: are both "haʊ dɪdʒʊ" and "haʊdʒə" used in American English?...
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133 views

Stress in the question: How about you?

If I transcribe this question "How about you?" to IPA it looks like: [ haʊ əˈbaʊt yu]. The dictionary shows the word "about" with primary stress on its second syllable but I think in my question it ...
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1answer
72 views

What is it called when some pronounces their “t” sharply

What is it called when people pronounce their "t" sounds so sharply that it sounds like the sound "eh" comes after the "t" sound? So the "t" sound sounds like "teh" with a big emphasis on the "eh" ...
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1answer
2k views

Pronunciation of Weather vs Whether

It seems to me that it's common to think that words "Whether" and "Weather" share the same pronunciation, simple google search produces the articles like http://www.elearnenglishlanguage.com/blog/...
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1answer
273 views

Pronunciation of “ikebana” by non-Japanophones

Apart from "very rarely", how is "ikebana" (Japanese flower arrangement) typically pronounced in real life by non-Japanophones? Is it the same as how it's pronounced in Japanese, or has it changed ...
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1answer
101 views

Does articulation (can't you) as [kæntʃ u: siː] a bit of conversational, not official style?

I'm hearing it in songs sometimes, but I can't remember such pronunciation on English class. Is it some kind of american english or more local dialect? First 'lyrics can't you see' result from youtube:...
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1answer
181 views

“25th De­cem­ber” vs “25 De­cem­ber”: Should I use or­di­nals or car­di­nals for the day of the month?

In one of the IELTS lis­ten­ing tests, there is a fill-out-the-blank ques­tion read­ing: The mu­seum is not open on ___. My an­swer was “25th De­cem­ber”. How­ever, the of­fi­cial an­swer is “25 ...
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58 views

How are the words “you” and “have” pronounced in this voice recording?

How are the words "you" and "have" pronounced in this voice recording? Yə, yʊ, yu, hæv or həv? https://vocaroo.com/i/s1Uc4Kdnekd2
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1answer
128 views

Why is the pronunciation of the word “definitely” often omits the syllable “nite”?

I was listening to the broadcasting of esport games(league of legends). As a non-native speaker, I found out that most of the time both the play-by-play caster and colored caster tend to ignore the ...
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1answer
511 views

How to pronounce the letter /r/

I've always had difficulty pronouncing the letter /r/. Whenever i try to say /r/ it comes out as a gha, a sound similar to the arabic letter غ. Any idea how i can fix this?
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1answer
48 views

Might use help transcribing a sentence

Could someone please help me with the following: What are man's words from 1:13 time mark to 1:16 in this video: How Were the Pyramids Built? I'm making subtitles for that video, so I'd really like ...
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1answer
750 views

Position of stress in English words derived from New Latin

In another thread on this site a question was asked about the pronunciation of the word Caribbean; that discussion focused on the position of the accent. Cognate forms of the word Caribbean have ...
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1answer
1k views

any rules for pronouncing “V” sound?

For example, "Is there any cars available?" When the speed of speech is getting faster, it isn't really going easy to make sure of making a lip formation about V where the bottom lip must be behind ...
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1answer
388 views

How to pronounce the word “height”?

I always pronounce it like hat, but today I google its phonetic symbol in google translation, which printed as hīt, which I thought will sound like hit, but google prounounced it just like hat. ...
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2answers
176 views

Word phonetics suggestion

Could any English speaker recommend me the best spelling for an 'invented' word that would be pronounced something like /ˈlɛvɪ/. As I'm no expert in phonetic symbols, those phonetic symbols are just ...