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Questions tagged [pronunciation]

for questions about the sound, stress, or intonation of spoken words.

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Is differing pronunciation of “second” a regional difference? (US English)

According to Wiktionary the word "second" can be pronounced one of two ways in the US: /ˈsɛk.(ə)nd/ and /ˈsɛk.(ə)nt/ I've googled to try to find anything about the difference between these ...
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116 views

Trump's pronunciation of “origins” as “oringes”

President Trump pronounced the word origins [ˈɔ:rɪʤɪnz] as oringes [ˈɔ:rɪnʤəz] in a meeting with NATO secretary general Stoltenberg at the White House on 3 April 2019. See this clip on Youtube. ...
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Pronunciation of “scald” and “old” (or “ol' ”) in West Ireland

Martin McDonagh's play, The Beauty Queen of Leenane, is obviously set in Leenane/Leenaun, Connemara, County Galway in the west of Ireland. In the script, the two words "scald" and "ol'" (short for "...
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64 views

How do people actually pronounce “Orange”?

There are questions on ELU about the phonemic transcriptions of orange in both British and American English in dictionaries. However, this being a site for linguists and all that, I thought I would ...
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267 views

“solder” and “salve” phonetics between AmE and BrE

Many will know that there are differences in AmE and BrE pronunciation of the words "solder" and "salve". On the topic of "solder", there are already two questions here asking about the correct ...
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957 views

How to pronounce “ReLU” (Rectified Linear Unit)?

A Rectified Linear Unit is a common activation function in deep neural networks and is often abbreviated as "ReLU". I usually pronounce it as /rel-you/ (with the "e" as in "relative" or "rectified"), ...
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183 views

caught-cot merger: can “lawyer” sound like “lier”?

"law" is pronounced as /lɑ/ if you speak with the caught-cot merger, so, logic suggests "lawyer" should sound like /lɑjɚ/, as "lawyer" is basically "law" + "yer" For me, the difference between /lɑjɚ/ ...
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238 views

The AIR and EAR Sounds

The one thing that confuses me the most are the AIR and EAR sounds as in AmERica and ExpERiment. What exactly is the AIR/EAR sound? The AIR sound is basically a short E or a long A sound controlled ...
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88 views

Where can I find OED articles on various phonemes' pronunciation?

Dear ladies and gentlemen. I found myself in need of a detailed source of information regarding variants of pronouncing English sounds, and chanced upon this answer presented by tchrist several years ...
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680 views

How to calculate number of syllables in a word using only the IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet) spelling?

I want to write an algorithm to calculate the number of syllables in a word. This process is an automated one that will be run on an entire dictionary so manually counting the number of breaths, chin ...
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757 views

Pronunciation Rule for “nt” in the Middle of Words

Is there a "rule" or pattern for the pronunciation of "nt" in the middle of words, followed by a vowel (or "er" sound)? Here's what I have so far: 1) "t" is often omitted in words like "wanted," "...
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347 views

How widespread is the pronunciation of “Parmesan” as /ˈpɑɹ.məˌʒɑn/ instead of /ˈpɑɹ.məˌzɑn/?

The letter s in the word Parmesan (meaning the cheese, named after the Parma region of Italy) is pronounced quite widely (Br & Aus AFAIK) as a /z/, per Wiktionary: UK, also found in the US: /ˈpɑɹ....
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689 views

In which vowel do the diphthongs [aʊ] and [aɪ] start?

Surfing the web, I found the following explanations on how to produce the diphthongs [aʊ] and [aɪ]: "/aʊ/ as in all the words of "How now brown cow!". The starting position is the vowel sound /æ/ as ...
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529 views

Sentence stress and word linking with the problematic Y?

the question: Can I use your bathroom? phonetically looks like: [kə_naɪ ˈyuz yər ˈbæθˌrum] I think the stress should be on the verb USE and the noun BATHROOM. Am I right? Some dictionaries show the ...
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41 views

Pronunciation of the /s/ letter in English language

I have a question about pronunciation Of /s/ sound after ‘th’ sound like these situations With /S/eventy-five Or With /S/ilver to make things simple since I’m not a native speaker Provide a word ...
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47 views

Does 'd' actually flap?

Flapping or tapping, also known as alveolar flapping, intervocalic flapping, or t-voicing, is a phonological process found in many dialects of English, especially North American English, Australian ...
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37 views

Is the letter “d” sometimes pronounced like a glottal stop?

Is the letter "d" sometimes pronounced like a glottal stop? For example is the letter "d" in the word "wouldn't" pronounced like a glottal stop?
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How does one pronounce “plebeian”?

The dictionary is unequivocal on this: pli-BEE-uhn. (dictionary.com pli-BEE-uhn However, many people say "PLEE-biuhn," and this does sound more natural. Or does it?
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42 views

Transcription and pronunciation of the 'un-' prefix in General American English

What's the correct transcription and pronunciation of the 'un-' prefix in General American English? Cambridge Online dictionary provides the following transcription: /ʌn/ It's the same in words with ...
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55 views

Pronunciation of the r and th sound together in American English

I can almost always pronounce the "r" or "th" sound alone, but when they are right next to each other, for example earth, throw, for the... I naturally make a short schwa sound in between and ...
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46 views

how do you pronounce a rolling “o” as in “so” or “no”?

I noticed that in New Zealand most people pronounce "o" at the end of "no" or "so" in a rather rolled manner - something closer to [our] instead of simple [ou]. For example, lady in this video does ...
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106 views

Connected speech resources

I am very interested in British pronunciation, so I am looking for resources about connected speech and IPA in general. The ideal would be a book with the transcription of dialogues or just ...
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95 views

Pronunciation of “inquiry” with first syllable stress?

I am an American and I always pronounce “inquiry” with second syllable stress. After hearing more and more Americans say it with first syllable stres, along with British people saying it the way I do,...
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41 views

Pronunciation of 's after word ending in “is”, “es”

Alexis's sister. Is it pronounced Alec sis sister or Alec sis sis sister?
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67 views

Is the T in “Can't” pronounced before words starting with vowels in the American pronunciation?

I know that (AE)"can't" is pronounced /kaen?/ with a glottal stop. What about it appearing before the words starting with vowels, for example, "I can't afford that car." Is it "canafford" or "...
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52 views

Vowel shift in Michigan accent?

I’ve spent a fair amount of time in Michigan because my grandparents live there. By today’s standards, they have very heavy accents, with full Canadian raising and the northern cities vowel shift. ...
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71 views

Different pronunciations of “-ead”/“-ed”/“-aid” words

I find that American/British English dialects tend to pronounce words like "bed", "red", "dead", "bred", "said", etc. with the exact same vowel sound: the IPA ɛ vowel (- and so this question may seem ...
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85 views

Different pronunciation

I have recently encountered a peculiar thing. While I was watching a Youtuber from England I heard him pronounce words like "everybody", "God" etc the American way with an /ɑ/ instead of an /ɒ/. This ...
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41 views

Is there a strong correlation between speech rate and beat rate in English

Can speech rate in English be reliably measured through the beat rate? Beat rate analysis is now pretty standard, and a plethora of algorithms can reliably measure beat rate — typically in beats per ...
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165 views

The proper pronunciation for “Message”

I am confused about the pronunciation of "message", if we look it up in a dictionary, the written phonetic is "ˈmes.ɪdʒ" (Cambridge Dictionary), but it is pronounced as if it was like "a" in hat ("hæt"...
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93 views

Is final -l becoming a vowel?

Oftentimes one can hear final l after a vowel get a vowel quality; whether this is an /u/ or /w/, I am not certain of. I have the feeling it is becoming more common today, but you can hear examples of ...
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78 views

How is the “e” in “clerk” pronounced differently from “terse”, “term” and “jerk”?

clerk, terse, term, jerk: every one of these words contains an "e" and it is pronounced as "e". However, I have seen "clerk" being treated differently from the other three words: the "e" was ...
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305 views

What is the phonetic transcription for my pronunciation of /l/?

Please listen to my pronunciation. http://vocaroo.com/i/s0DWEjzb1GpG When I say "seagull", when making the L sound, my tongue makes contact with the area behind my front teeth. It's an /l/. But ...
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Are /ɪnˈfɪə/ or /ɪnˈfirəns/ actually used?

I had a debate with a non-native speaker who pronounced infer as /ɪnˈfɪə/; rhymes with career inference as /ɪnˈfirəns/; rhymes with clearance; stress on the second syllable and claimed that this ...
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213 views

Pronunciation of FEIN as acronym in US

According to Wikipedia, FEIN is an abbreviation for Federal Employer Identification Number in the US. Cursory googling shows me that as a name, it could be pronounced fine or like faint, and in german,...
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Is it more common for the noun “research” to be stressed on the first or second syllable among educated native speakers of American English?

Which of the two common pronunciations of the noun research is more common among educated native American English speakers? /rɪ ˈsɝt͡ʃ/ with the stress on the second syllable /ˈriː sɚt͡ʃ/ with the ...
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770 views

Silent Letters In Words Containing Double Letters

I'm doing an exercise, which says find the silent letters in some words. one of them is "OFFICE" Does this word have 1 or 2 silent letters? The final 'E'     Or     final 'E' + one of 'F's Are double ...
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81 views

The origins of the North American glottalised stop in place of certain consonant groups

In some North American speech (not sure about Canada;), I have long noted the pronunciation of certain consonant combinations that seem to have drifted to what sounds like some form of glottalised ...
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71 views

Is there always a difference between /ə(ɹ)z/ and /ɪz/?

Is there always a difference between the following two sounds: /ɪz/ as in the end of 'hedges' /ə(ɹ)z/ as in the end of 'ledgers' They seem super close. Is there any accent in which they sound the ...
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149 views

The perception of /ɑ/ and /a/

The Cambridge Dictionary transcription for the word barn is /bɑːrn/ If someone says this word as /baːrn/ (open front vowel), will this sound foreign to you? Will you notice at all? What will your ...
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160 views

Do native English speakers always stress content words rather than the final important word of a sentence?

I’ve watched lots of videos and read lots of articles that talk about this subject. However, I couldn’t understand because almost every article says something either new or different. So, I’d love to ...
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143 views

How do we get pronunciation Yoost to?

In this thread How does the phrase "used to" work, grammatically? the construct "used to" is discussed but there is no mention of its pronunciation. Here (Canada) the "used" in this phrase ...
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447 views

The word “royal”

I noticed this because of the Youtube videos about the to-be-released Pokemon game. There is a new battling style called "Battle Royal" and in those videos they pronounce royal as "roi-aww," putting ...
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266 views

Pronunciation difference between “Mayonnaise” & “Vase”

I've seen quite many people pronounce "Mayonnaise" with "-s" at the end, although its phonetic alphabet is written as '/meɪəneɪz/'. So at first I thought /eɪ/ + s could be versatile as /eɪs/ or /eɪz/, ...
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240 views

Is day-ta more common in the South or the North of the US?

So I've read that dah-ta is more common in the US than in other places, but is day-ta or dah-ta more common to hear in the South? I haven't been able to find that out for sure.
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252 views

vowel sound in “stair” pronounced similarly as the “eɪ” diphthong in “fake”?

Sometimes in words which have the ɛ sound followed by an "r" as in "stair", "their" "bear", "where" I hear them pronounced like "steɪəɹ", ðeɪəɹ etc. with the "eɪ" as in "fake", "lake","make" and not ...
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219 views

“hundred” and “pretty” pronounced respectively as [ˈhən-dərd] and [ˈpər-tē]

Merriam-Webster's A Pronouncing Dictionary of American English gives [ˈhən-dərd], [ˈpər-tē], [ˈtem-pə(r)-ˌchu̇r], [ˈse-kə(r)-ˌterē], etc., as alternate ways to pronounce "hundred," "pretty," "...
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91 views

Can the “t” letter be uttered as a flap t before the letter “h”?

I know the flap-t is usually used when the "t" is between vowels or between an "r" and a vowel, but I think I can also hear it betwenn vowels and the "h". And I noticed the same with the "g" I think. ...
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1k views

Could you Clarify the Front - Back & Close - Open position & other positions in between in IPA vowel chart?

See the IPA vowel chart A front vowel is any in a class of vowel sound used in some spoken languages. The defining characteristic of a front vowel is that the tongue is positioned as far in ...
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Words that are spoken one way but written another

I was recently involved in answering this question: Renumeration vs Remuneration (reimbursed financially), which is correct? Which asks whether "renumeration" or "remuneration" is correct in terms ...