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Questions tagged [prescriptive-grammar]

The tag has no usage guidance.

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1answer
29 views

HAVE (negation, contraction)

Why is (1) considered correct, but not (2) ? (1) This would have been such had it not been for... (2) This would have been such hadn't it been for... P.S.: Besides, should there be commas as ...
0
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2answers
43 views

Use of the third-person personal pronoun subject 'he' or 'she' for an animal

Is it possible to use the personal pronoun subject he or she for an animal? One of my friends said that there is a possibility of using it for animals. My concern is that my friend did not give me the ...
0
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1answer
25 views

Past Progressive vs Past Perfect Progressive in the sentence below [duplicate]

Do both sentences (below) have the same meaning? He was doing landscape work before he was hired by the taxi company. He had been doing landscape work before he was hired by the taxi company.
0
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1answer
49 views

In search of a Grammar text, of any vintage, that covers such as the below

I've searched websites, written to Mr. Barth and William Safire, scanned bookstore shelves, and buttonholed likely prospects in search of a grammar text that would address matters in the manner of the ...
1
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1answer
51 views

Is “there is no longer enough resources” correct?

Is "there is no longer enough natural resources to support economic growth" correct? Should it be There are no longer enough natural resources as verb should agree with noun "resources" which is ...
0
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1answer
94 views

Why isn't {-able} considered a free morpheme?

So the question is that if the morpheme, {-able}, is considered a bound morpheme, however, I am not sure why it cannot be used by itself and be considered a free morpheme, i.e. I am able to do this. ...
6
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4answers
4k views

Is the correct pronunciation of “Have you seen Mary's book” “Mary book”?

So there is this question about the pronunciation of the noun possessive inflection. A certain text states that a zero allomorph is used by certain American English speakers for the noun possessive ...
23
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6answers
800 views

Verbs after 'as well as'—is this Merriam-Webster example wrong?

Before branding this question a duplicate, please note that I have already noticed some questions here pertaining to the use of 'as well as'. I have also noticed that none of the answers to them are ...
1
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1answer
22 views

Defining and Non defining Relative clauses

Is the following sentence a define or not defining relative clause. Since, when we remove the part enclosed in commas, the remaining part doesn't make sense, I think it is a defining relative clause ...
1
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1answer
203 views

Multi-colorful or multi-colored? [closed]

Is multi-colorful a word? Or is the correct word multi-colored?
1
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1answer
98 views

Syncretism of plain primary and plain secondary in Huddleston’s verb paradigm

Rodney Huddleston argued that grammars should only allow for “inflectional distinction” between two forms of a verb when “there is at least one lexeme with a stable contrast in ...
0
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1answer
216 views

Using a comma after a question mark inside quotation marks? [duplicate]

Can I use a comma following a question mark (as part of a title), inside quotation marks? It sounds like quite a complicated question, but all I want to do is correctly write the sentence: "...
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0answers
75 views

Historical resistance to inanimate 'will'

English, it is said, has no future tense. To indicate future we do not inflect our verbs but instead use the modal verb will. In his answer to Why do we say “was supposed to” for “should have”? ...
0
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1answer
289 views

When do we not use definite article, “the”? [duplicate]

I have a question. Could you please explain why “the” is not used in the parts that I have indicated in bold? Why is "the" missing? Little is known about the lives of early human beings. What we do ...
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1answer
361 views

Error check regarding grammar [closed]

According to my teacher all of the following sentences are wrong. The test was given regarding modals and prepositions.Look: 1:I walked on the road. (She says across is correct instead of "on") 2:The ...
5
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4answers
432 views

What stylistic or grammatical reasons prevent users and grammarians from reaching a consensus in the debate over the comma splice?

This is not a duplicate of earlier questions asking whether or why the comma splice is an error, because I am asking about the debate itself: unlike many another grammar rule that is widely accepted ...
2
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1answer
481 views

Is it undesirable to have two consecutive words end in “s”?

I read a related question on this topic, the title of which bears great similarity. But I was unable to find an answer in that question, and it seems the example given was dissimilar. Here is an ...
0
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0answers
2k views

“Despite me being” vs. “Despite my being” [duplicate]

Which of the these sentences is grammatically (prescriptivistly) correct and why? Sentence 1: "Despite me being busy, I will attend." Sentence 2: "Despite my being busy, I will attend."
0
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1answer
70 views

Is using progressive first person incorrect in a first person narrative? [closed]

Awhile ago I had to write a short first person piece in my English class- everyone did- and then we could volunteer to read them out loud. Since no one was doing anything, I decided to act and read ...
2
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1answer
128 views

Is end-weight a linguistic term or is there an other word for it?

"Cambridge Grammar in Use" ( p.902), in the glossary, points to the term "Endweight" but I find it nowhere else as a linguistics term. Is it because it is Cambridge Univ. Pr.'s own coinage? If not, ...
4
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3answers
250 views

Is there a word or phrase in linguistics describes the patterns of English in common use?

The crux of my question is how do we get from descriptive linguistic grammars for English to the often confusing contradictory and tedious grammar rules taught to native speakers and esl students? ...
0
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0answers
32 views

Singular? Plural? (I would like a “grammar answer”) [duplicate]

Here's a sentence from an ESL book: The status and rights of British nationals living in the EU and of EU nationals living in the UK is a primary concern. The sentence above has actually two ...
1
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1answer
120 views

“a” verus “an” for abbreviations starting with 'U'

My friend is implementing an app for Amazon Alexa which currently speaks the indefinite article "an" in noun phrase acronyms which start with the letter 'U', for example: (1.) *I found out he was an ...
0
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1answer
426 views

Traditional explanation for 'I don't remember whom is whom'

I'm looking for a traditional grammar explanation in regards to the sentence: 'I don't remember whom is whom.' Also I'll preface that I'm native speaker for whatever that's worth... Now I understand ...
1
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1answer
56 views

How does one use an apostrophe when introducing a person and their belonging? [duplicate]

Daniel runs into Nancy's, his sister's, bedroom. Daniel runs into Nancy's, his sister, bedroom. Daniel runs into Nancy, his sister's, bedroom. Out of the three statements above, which one is ...
8
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3answers
37k views

“Here is my two cents” vs “Here are my two cents”?

Which of the following two phrases is correct, in the context of giving an opinion on a subject? Here is my two cents on subject X Here are my two cents on subject X Most of what I found online was ...
2
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2answers
332 views

An expression about gerunds [duplicate]

Can we say: His mother forbade his going out at midnight. In some countries, women's wearing tiny skirts is totally forbidden! But I don't mind (my) smoking here. here can we add "my"? Somebody ...
0
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1answer
362 views

Three sentences about v-ing meaning [closed]

I'm confused about three sentences of v-ing verbs. I love my cooking fish(Here my is unnecessary?) Besides I love my feelings(Here is ok, because means something you have got but not an act) But ...
1
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0answers
64 views

Confused of three deverbal nouns in dictionary

I have learnt something about deverbal nouns before. a)These readings are quite interesting (Here it means books,refers to something) b)I did some reading of history books(Here it means the ...
0
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1answer
861 views

Order of “sometimes” relative to the subject of a sentence in the passive voice

I have a doubt that is the following one: I have two alternative sentence transformations of this sentence below and, I wonder if it is possible to write the adverb "sometimes" before the subject "...
1
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1answer
2k views

“I went to the cinema after eating my dinner” - is “after” a preposition or subordinating conjunction?

English schools are introducing some assessment tests for all children. Some people are unhappy with this. A politician was interviewed on the radio about it, and was asked one of the questions. (...
1
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1answer
853 views

A question on usage of could and was able to

As you know,we use could for general ability. But if we want to say that somebody did something in a specific situation,we have to use was/were able to or managed to **(not **could ). I know the below ...
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2answers
944 views

If they had continued… question

"He headed the truck to the school, part way his wife decided to convince him to turn back to their house because there was fire everywere on the way to the school and she thought that they were going ...
2
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4answers
24k views

Question about the phrase “interests me”

The teacher marked the words "interests me" in the following sentence to be gramatically wrong, why? I think the sentence is gramatically correct. "I never thought that I was going to be accepted ...
8
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3answers
2k views

“Being [he/him] is not easy.” Which is prescriptively “correct”?

"It is I" follows a well-known prescriptivist rule This question is about prescriptive grammar. It’s a fairly well-known prescriptivist rule that “me, him, her, them” (in other words, pronouns in the ...