Questions tagged [prepositions]

Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition. Questions need to include enough information for the intended meaning to be deduced.

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13
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5answers
4k views

Is there a difference in meaning between “fill {something} in” and “fill {something} out” in American English?

Is there a subtle or significant difference in meaning between the following? fill something in fill something out In my humble opinion, the two expressions are interchangeable and both ...
13
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2answers
2k views

Is the second “on” necessary in this sentence?

“It still makes economic sense” to put on as much weight on as efficiently as you can, to minimize losses” feedlot owner Tom Fanning told Bloomberg. https://www.voanews.com/a/mht-good-news-for-burger-...
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4answers
47k views

Usage of the verb “provide”

Does the verb "provide" always have to be used with "with"? For example, Can you provide me with some good examples? Can you provide me some good examples? Can you provide some good ...
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5answers
248k views

“On mind” vs “in mind”

Are these interchangeable? Do you have anything in your mind? Do you have anything on your mind? The first form seems to be the most commonly used one. But the second form is also used in ...
13
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3answers
209k views

“I will do it by Monday”. Does it mean before the beginning or before the end of Monday? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Does “notified by [date]” include the end date? When someone says "I will do it by Monday", does it mean that they will get it done before the beginning of Monday ...
13
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3answers
144k views

“Apply for” vs. “apply to”

Here I want to say that this function just should be applied to the following classes: A, B and C. This function just applies for/to A, B and C. But once again I am not sure which preposition ...
13
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5answers
217k views

What is the difference between “heading to” and “heading for”?

What is the difference between to and for in the following statements? I am headed to the airport. I am headed for the airport.
13
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2answers
300k views

“To work for” vs. “to work in” vs. “to work at” [closed]

Is the preposition in universal in conjunction with the verb ‘to work’ and can it be used with any organizations and businesses? For example: He works as a cook in a local hotel near here. He ...
13
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2answers
85k views

Is it “expert in” or “expert on”?

When would you use "expert in" and when would you use "expert on"? A quick google search yields about the same for both, but I have a feeling "expert in" can occur in sentences somehow with a ...
13
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7answers
77k views

Which is correct: “bored of”, “bored by”, “bored with”?

I have been asked by a young friend, "Which is correct: bored by, bored of, or bored with?" My instinct is to say that "bored of" and "bored by" are fine, but "bored with" sounds like she is being ...
13
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3answers
63k views

When to use “click” and “click on”

In the context of computers or websites, when should one use click or click on? Click (on) the right mouse button Click (on) the word 'Download' Click (on) the Start button Click (on) here for more ...
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6answers
26k views

What preposition should one use with “redundant”?

I realize it's usually better to just say "A and B are redundant". But, I've also seen A is redundant with B ... to B ... of B all with basically the same intended meaning. Are any of these more (...
13
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1answer
29k views

“In contrast with” or “In contrast to” (or something else)?

In my writing I often like to make a comparison between two things. However, I'm not sure how I should start my sentence and if it's even a good idea to start it this way. Example: React has a ...
13
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4answers
152k views

“In the hope of” vs. “with the hope of”

While solving a question I encountered a situation when there was a subtle difference between the two: After meeting together near Mediolanurn in 313, Roman Emperors Constantine Augustus and ...
13
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3answers
15k views

Can you say “in there”?

I was reading Harry Potter and I had a question. After lunch they went to the reptile house. It was cool and dark in there, with lit windows along the walls. I'm confused because I learned that ...
13
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1answer
800 views

U-English of the 1950s: what was used instead of “ON holiday”?

I am reading U and non-U by Alan S.C. Ross, written in 1956. He wrote that the preposition on was non-U in the following sentence: She's on holiday This made me wonder what the correct U ...
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4answers
2k views

Can a preposition have the form of superlative?

They had almost reached the door when a voice spoke from the chair nearest them, "I can't believe you're going to do this.” I guess nearest is at the place of preposition. Can a preposition have ...
12
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2answers
16k views

Using “to” twice in a row

In the sentence "Who should I talk to to learn about that?" my grammar checker says I have a repeated word. I admit that it sounds a little awkward, but I'm not sure it's incorrect. I realize I could ...
12
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3answers
71k views

What general rules govern the usage of “by” versus “through”?

What general rules govern the usage of by versus through? For example, which is correct in each of these cases: My house is heated by/through gas. I'll send it to you by/through mail. I'll pay ...
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4answers
17k views

Meaning of 'up/down' after a verb [closed]

There are lots of instances of using 'up' or 'down' after verbs. Instances: eat up, drink up, meet up, finish up, start up, fill up, clean up, wipe up, tie up, etc. What do they add as meaning to a ...
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4answers
5k views

Using “apologize” without “for”

Is it grammatically correct to use "apologize" as a verb without the preposition "for"? apologize: to make a formal defense in speech or writing. "I apologize the event." Wouldn't this mean ...
12
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4answers
36k views

Does “apropos” take a preposition? How do you use this word, anyway?

Which is more correct: Apropos of your earlier comment, I decided to.... or Apropos your earlier comment, I decided to... Actually, apropos is so fancy a word, even I, a word maven if I do ...
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4answers
6k views

Is “her” a possessive or an objective pronoun in “A mother takes care of her children”?

I had a sort of debate with my teacher to whether the her in the sentence A mother takes care of her children. is a possessive or an objective pronoun. I told my teacher that it was a possessive ...
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1answer
80k views

“Answer to my question” or “answer on my question”?

What's the right usage: an answer to my question or on my question?
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3answers
6k views

The sentence with the most prepositions at its end — does it really work?

What did you bring that book that I don't want to be read to from out of about 'Down Under' up for? I was wondering whether this sentence is actually correct and if it is, whether someone could ...
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4answers
89k views

“publish in” vs. “publish on”

I've been looking thoroughly about each constructions, but I haven't been successful about when to use them. Some rules of thumb I've found: This forum post and this one suggest publish in ...
12
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6answers
42k views

“Solution to” vs. “solution of ”

What is the difference between saying solution to the problem and saying solution of the problem? Are they both equivalent, or is there some difference?
12
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2answers
99k views

“leave to” or “leave for”

Which of the following is correct? I am leaving for London. I am leaving to London. I have always thought the first one is correct till I came across the name of this painting.
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3answers
17k views

Prepositions at the end of sentence and whom

I believe it's okay to end a sentence with a preposition. That seems to be the consensus here as well. Now I think that when who is the object of a preposition, it should technically be whom, e.g. "...
12
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2answers
159k views

“helpful for you” or “helpful to you”

Which is more correct? "is helpful for you" or "is helpful to you" Context: Closing line of an email. eg. "I hope this information is helpful for you."
12
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7answers
51k views

Enamored of/with/by

It seems that "enamored" can be used with any of the prepositions "of", "with", and "by". What is the proper usage for each? This is the sentence I'm writing: The team, enamored with this new ...
12
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1answer
158k views

When are you “fascinated with” something, and when are you “fascinated by” it?

Am I fascinated with consumer technology or fascinated by it? What about a book, an object, or a philosophical idea?
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2answers
51k views

What does “wherein” mean exactly?

I have encountered wherein several times in many texts, and the general meaning of the texts was quite evident given the context. However, I do not know the exact meaning of wherein; a dictionary ...
12
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1answer
95k views

“Position in/at/for your company”

Which is correct? I am writing to apply for the position of ____ in your company. I am writinng to apply for the position of ____ at your company. I am writinng to apply for the position of ...
12
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7answers
20k views

What preposition should follow “jealousy”?

My favorite online dictionary tells me that jealousy is followed by the preposition of: jealousy (of so.|sth.) - die Eifersucht (auf jmdn.|etw.) (LEO) But when I checked just-the-word, I noticed ...
11
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4answers
143k views

Proper usage of “since” and “from” with regard to duration of time

When you returned, I had been at home since 10 minutes. When you returned, I had been at home from 5 minutes. In such sentences, is it correct to use since or from? When since is used?
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11answers
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“Gassy emissions from these giant dinosaurs” vs. “… by these giant dinosaurs”

Reading a science article on Huffington Post, titled "Dinosaur Farts, Prehistoric Climate Change Linked In New Methane Gas Study", I came across the following sentence: The gassy emissions from ...
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3answers
3k views

Does code run in or on a thread?

Any programmers around? Which of the following is correct, or more common: The code runs in a background thread. The code runs on a background thread. That's it. Just a simple word different. As an ...
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3answers
13k views

“Struggle with” vs. “struggle against”

Somewhat related to: Is "to fight with" ambiguous? For some reason prepositions are presenting me problems lately. To struggle with and to struggle against basically have identical ...
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2answers
2k views

“Member FDIC” instead of “Member of FDIC”?

For several years now (as long as I've paid attention) almost every ad or commercial for a bank or credit union says they are Member FDIC or Member NCUA. Where is the of? Why are these not Member of ...
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11answers
2k views

Are older senses of “anent” still alive in any dialect?

The obscure preposition anent has a long history, going back as far as Beowulf: him on efn ligeð ealdorgewinna [line 2903] ("beside him lies his great enemy") It has carried many meanings, ...
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1answer
56k views

Aim for, aim at, aim to

I was asked what the differences are in usage between these three, but I think I probably confused things more than I helped. I guess mostly it's a matter of style? I wondered if anyone had a good ...
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1answer
1k views

Is there a rule in preposition-using?

Like the title, I randomly checked my son's textbook one day and found out some interesting things, like: "I'm on a bus," "I'm in a car," "I'm on a scooter," "I'm on a skateboard," "I'm on a bike," ...
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4answers
133k views

What's the difference in usage between “annoyed at”, “annoyed with”, and “annoyed by”?

When is it appropriate to use annoyed at? Can I say I'm annoyed at you or should it be annoyed with you? What about annoyed by? I've read somewhere that annoyed with is for people and annoyed at is ...
11
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3answers
84k views

When is “between” inclusive and when exclusive?

It seems that the exact meaning of between is very tied to its specific usage. What should I assume in a general situation about the inclusivity of between? Consider: "Pick a number between 1 and 10."...
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6answers
62k views

Preposition after “Good luck”

I have seen different prepositions after "Good luck". Example: Good luck on/with/for your new job Could you explain the possible differences of usage or meaning? Thank you.
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5answers
2k views

When can “very” modify a prepositional phrase?

In Hamlet, when Hammy Jr. asks Polonius whether a cloud looks like a whale, Polly replies, Very like a whale. In contemporary English, however, "very like ..." feels ungrammatical. You instead ...
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2answers
591 views

“Music with rocks in” - British English?

I've been reading a multitude of Terry Pratchet books lately, and been exposed to some British terminology that doesn't generally make it over to the states. The book Soul Music refers to rock music ...
11
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2answers
65k views

'Opposite to' or 'opposite'?

Which usage of the word opposite is correct? Their house is opposite to the Red Cross Hospital. Their house is opposite the Red Cross Hospital. I cannot seem to find a definite answer on ...
11
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4answers
52k views

What preposition to use with “enamour”?

What preposition should follow enamour? Is one enamoured with something, or enamoured by something or enamoured of something or is it anything else? If more than one of the above is possible, is there ...