Questions tagged [prepositions]

Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition. Questions need to include enough information for the intended meaning to be deduced.

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28
votes
2answers
215k views

“On a page” or “in a page” for a web page

Which is the correct usage: Something on a page OR Something in a page By page, I mean a web page, not a physical book page.
27
votes
6answers
245k views

Which one is correct? “Explain me” or “Explain to me”?

Which of the following expressions is correct? -Explain me. -Explain to me. I know "Explain it to me" is correct, but I want to know which one of the above is valid.
27
votes
3answers
174k views

“Thru” vs. “through”

Could anyone explain the differences between "thru" and "through"? Is the difference only in spelling? Is "thru" some sort of slang?
27
votes
4answers
168k views

“On website” or “at website”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: This question has been asked at/on SO? Which sentence is grammatically correct? The papers are freely available at the journal website. The papers are freely available on the ...
26
votes
6answers
223k views

“At the beginning” or “in the beginning”?

Are both expressions "At the beginning" "In the beginning" valid and equivalent? The first "seems wrong" to me, but it has more Google results.
26
votes
2answers
534k views

“Angry with” vs. “angry at” vs. “angry on”

Which is the most appropriate/correct usage? Are you angry on me? Are you angry with me? Are you angry at me?
26
votes
4answers
27k views

“Bad with something” or “bad at something”?

In a question on Spanish.StackExchange, a question came up about expressing that you are bad at remembering or doing something. Is one "bad at something" or "bad with something" (nouns)? What about "...
26
votes
3answers
393k views

Difference between “think of” and “think about”

Is there a difference between "think of something" and "think about something"? I've also met "have heard of/about something".
25
votes
9answers
4k views

Beer is made ___ yeast, water, hops, and malted barley

Which is the correct answer to fill in the gap in "Beer is made ____ yeast, water, hops and malted barley"? of from with out of I am leaning toward '2'. "Made from" can be used to describe a ...
25
votes
3answers
56k views

“Denoted by” or just “denoted”?

In a mathematical context (explaining a formula just written) the following seems unobjectionable: "The set of unitary polynomials has been denoted by P". My question is whether it sounds right to ...
25
votes
3answers
206k views

“Need of” vs. “need for”

Is "need of religion" grammatically incorrect as opposed to "need for religion"? Or "need of salt" vs. "need for salt"?
25
votes
8answers
257k views

At Night or In the Night?

Why do we refer to morning, afternoon and evening as 'in the morning', 'in the afternoon', 'in the evening' but not 'in the night' instead we say 'at night.'
25
votes
3answers
418k views

“Convenient for you” vs “convenient to you”

Is there a difference between "convenient for you" and "convenient to you"? And if it is, could you explain it?
24
votes
3answers
5k views

Why is it “on the inside” and not “in the inside”?

The expression "in the inside" appears to be logical (because insides are closed spaces with boundaries) but the more common expression is "on the inside." What’s the reason behind this usage?
24
votes
1answer
296k views

“Scheduled on” vs “scheduled for”

What is the difference between the following two expressions: My interview is scheduled on the 27th of June at 8:00 AM. My interview is scheduled for the 27th of June at 8:00 AM.
24
votes
5answers
51k views

“Split in” vs “split into”

In the sentence I have a bibliography page which I'd like to split in/into sections which would you rather use: split in or split into? Why?
23
votes
5answers
281k views

“In a while” vs. “for a while”

I recently got a message that says Haven't heard anything from you in a while. I always thought that the right way to say this would be to use for insdead of in. Are both versions correct? Would ...
23
votes
3answers
92k views

“I am on it” vs. “I am at it”

What are the differences between I am on it and I am at it? What does the latter mean? I found the definition of the former on Urban Dictionary and understand that it means I'm going to solve it ...
23
votes
2answers
179k views

“Studying PhD at the university” or “studying PhD in the university”?

Which of these two sentences is correct: I am studying PhD at the university. I am studying PhD in the university. Should I use "at" or "in"? Or is there no difference?
23
votes
5answers
577k views

“At/on (the) weekend(s)”

Which expression is better? Which is right? Why? A. Sorry to disturb you at weekend. B. Sorry to disturb you on weekend. C. Sorry to disturb you at weekends. D. Sorry to ...
23
votes
5answers
22k views

ON an American street, but IN a British one. Do the twain ever meet?

In the United States, we say that someone lives on a street, whereas I've noticed that British people say in. For instance: Bubba lives on Washington Street. Colin lives in Cavendish Avenue. I ...
23
votes
3answers
201k views

When do we use “arrive at” versus “arrive in”?

When do we use "at" and "in" with "arrive" talking about place, not time?
23
votes
6answers
136k views

Difference between “in contrast to” and “in contrast with” [duplicate]

I am just wondering about the difference between: in contrast to and in contrast with
22
votes
6answers
23k views

What does “I am married with three kids” mean?

Where did this come from? It sounds nasty to me (I am not a native speaker). But it seems correct. Can somebody explain this?
22
votes
5answers
146k views

Does “notified by [date]” include the end date?

I have read the Rules of a competition. The text of the Rules include a sentence as follows: As per stated in the Rules the entrants will be notified by May 30th 2010. Does the sentence above mean ...
22
votes
5answers
103k views

“Know about” vs. “know of”

Recently one of my friends told me that there is distinct difference between 'know of something' and 'know about something' expressions. 'know of' is used when you have personal experience with what ...
22
votes
3answers
141k views

On vs At with date and time

This must be a simple question for a native speaker. I know that we use "on" with dates: I'll see you on January 1st. And we use "at" with times: I'll see you at 17:30. But what preposition has to ...
22
votes
1answer
111k views

What is the difference between “in-between” and “between”?

Do in-between and between have different meanings? What is the difference between in-between and between?
21
votes
6answers
362k views

“on the train” or “in the train”?

Which of these is correct: "I am on the train" or "I am in the train"?
21
votes
3answers
69k views

Why is 'to' not used before 'home'?

While learning English, I was taught not to put 'to' in front of 'home'. I.e. "go to home" is incorrect, you should say "go home". Is there a reason (maybe historical) for this?
21
votes
3answers
5k views

Why do so many people speak 'to' topics rather than 'on' or 'about' them? Is this a recent phenomenon? [closed]

"I will speak to that later." It seems to be most common in lecture theatres. Surely the preposition 'to' can only accurately refer to the hearer in this context. The topic itself is not the ...
21
votes
4answers
109k views

“Approach to” or “approach for”

When do you use approach for, and when do you use approach to? (How can I answer questions like this? In which dictionaries should I look? How do I google it?) The reason to ask this question is an ...
21
votes
2answers
36k views

“Deployed to” vs “deployed on”

Which one of the following statements is correct: I deployed something to the test server. I deployed something on the test server.
21
votes
2answers
457k views

How to correctly apply “in which”, “of which”, “at which”, “to which”, etc? [closed]

How does one correctly apply “in which”, “of which”, “at which”, “to which”, etc.? I'm confused with which one to apply when constructing sentences around these.
21
votes
1answer
89k views

Is there a difference between “for this purpose” and “to this purpose”?

Is there a difference between these two expressions and should one of them be preferred?
20
votes
4answers
137k views

Difference between “been to” and “been in”

In the following two examples, what is the difference between the usage of been to and been in? They seem like they have the same meaning but I’m not sure. -Have you ever been to Florida? -Yes, I’...
20
votes
7answers
190k views

“based in” vs “based out of ”

I have seen people use both forms below. Which is correct? If both are, in which situation is each better used? I am a software engineer based in New York. I am a software engineer based out ...
20
votes
2answers
116k views

Preposition with verb “provide”

It appears the transitive verb provide has (at least) two prepositions: provide (something) for (someone/something) provide (something) to (someone/something) For example, The umbrellas ...
19
votes
7answers
105k views

How can I explain to people that the phrase “off of ” is grammatically incorrect? [closed]

How can I explain to people that the phrase off of is grammatically incorrect? I‘ve heard this phrase used a lot, especially by Americans (though they aren't the only ones). In my understanding, ...
19
votes
5answers
107k views

What does 'ten of six' mean in regard to time?

I am referring of course to the expression describing time. Today a corporate trainer (From north Philadelphia) that is teaching a class at my company used it in the context that the current time was '...
19
votes
4answers
28k views

“All our X” vs. “all of our X”

Is the word "of" optional in this instance? Is either of these considered preferable to the other? Taste all our delicious treats. Taste all of our delicious treats.
19
votes
1answer
132k views

“Answer to the question” vs. “answer for the question” vs. “answer of the question”

The answer to the question. The answer for the question. The answer of the question. Which is grammatical? What are the differences? And what is the preferred usage?
19
votes
5answers
60k views

Install on, install in, install to

When I say "programs to install on a new PC" it sounds alright to me, but I'm not sure if it's the correct usage. Which one of the following should I use? Programs to install on a new PC Programs to ...
19
votes
3answers
62k views

“Outside” or “outside of”?

The word rarely turns up outside that context. and The word rarely turns up outside of that context. Which one is correct and why?
19
votes
6answers
150k views

When should I use “a discussion of” vs. “a discussion on” vs. “a discussion about”?

“A discussion of”, “a discussion on”, and “a discussion about”: When is each phrase used in preference to the other? If context is important, I want to use it as a subheading on a piece of non-fiction....
19
votes
5answers
73k views

“In order to…”, “To…” or “For…”

What preposition should we use to start a sentence where we first explain a purpose and then a method to achieve it? Example 1 Purpose = pass the exams Method = study a lot In order to pass the ...
19
votes
3answers
311k views

“In respect of” / “With respect to”

Is there a difference in meaning between, "in respect of" and "with respect to"? Is it grammatically correct to use, "in respect to...."? The full context I am concerned with currently reads: "My ...
18
votes
3answers
24k views

“Make something out of” or “Make something with”?

So there was a fill in quiz I had to do, and there was a question it says: Bill can make a doghouse _ paper. That's cool. I filled in 'out of'. Bill can make a doghouse out of paper. And my ...
18
votes
4answers
635k views

Which one is correct, “best wishes to you” or “best wishes for you”?

Which one is correct, "best wishes to you" or "best wishes for you"?
18
votes
4answers
119k views

Relating to or related to?

I read this sentence in a book. However, it does not solve specific problems relating to a business or a profession. I often use related to instead of relating to. Is there any difference?