Questions tagged [prepositions]

Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition. Questions need to include enough information for the intended meaning to be deduced.

243 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
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4
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1answer
214 views

What rule governs the usage of “by” versus “with”?

There are many instances where by and with mean something completely different, but which is the correct preposition usage in the following sentences? A file by the same name as the original file. A ...
3
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0answers
30 views

What's the grammatical principle behind the use of 'for' with an adjective?

The following common expressions are in the form of for in conjunction with an adjective: (give/take) for granted (leave) for dead for better/worse for sure/certain There doesn't seem to be anything ...
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2answers
2k views

What's the difference between “aspects of” and “aspects to”?

I just wrote There are two strange aspects of this situation. Then I decided that There are two strange aspects to this situation. sounded better, but I don't know why. There are certainly ...
3
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1answer
1k views

What’s the reason for the zero article after a preposition and countable noun in “a change of X” and in “a switch from X to Y”?

I am a non-native speaker of English and therefore need your help. The question is: why do we use the zero article in the phrases “a change of X” and “a switch from X to Y”? For instance: a change ...
3
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1answer
150 views

In + pres. participle constructions (“In performing,” “in using”)

I'm working on preparing some text for translation into Spanish and have come across this construction, which sounds perfectly fine to me, but I've been unable to find any definition or description ...
3
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1answer
85 views

Prepositional verb structure - “[rely] [on John]” or “[rely on] [John]”

It is difficult to determine the correct consituent structure of prepositional verbs, such as rely on someone. Either on someone forms a constituent to the exclusion of rely, as in (1), or rely on ...
2
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0answers
30 views

made of VS made from (not duplicate, tricky one)

Here I would like to ask a question about the usage of made of and made from. I know the issue has been discussed on this forum many times before, but this time I would like to ask a tricky question ...
2
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1answer
42 views

In the phrase, “The big shots up at the church”, is 'up at" a two word preposition?

I'm struggling with how to diagram 'up at'. Is this a two word or complex preposition or something else?
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0answers
113 views

Is “membership to an organisation” wrong?

I have been seeing increasing use of "membership to an organisation" (club, association etc.). The "to" makes my teeth grate, as I have always used "of". Should I continue to resist (I run a large ...
2
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2answers
573 views

Is “of” needed here? “I have no idea of what to do”

I have no idea of what to do. I have no idea what to do. Q1. Can we use both expressions? Are both grammatical? Q2. Is 'no idea' in apposition with 'what to do'? What is the relationship between them?...
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505 views

Usage of 'of' vs 'for'

What is the difference between 'process of registration of application' and 'process of registration for application'?
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3answers
3k views

“I remember the advice he gave to me” Why add preposition to?

While I was reading a book, I stumbled upon a sentence "I remember the advice he gave to me". From my understanding, give can be used in two ways. First. Give + IO + DO. For example, "He gave me an ...
2
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0answers
93 views

What does one call the noun a preposition relates to its object?

With minimal research online one can easily find that a prepositional phrase consists of a preposition and an object. Most online and paper resources will describe a preposition as a word that ...
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0answers
421 views

use of an infinitive immediately after a relative pronoun with a preposition

I was wondering if someone could please help me confirm whether or not, after a relative pronoun preceded by a preposition, you can follow up with an infinitive immediately afterwards or if you have ...
2
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0answers
389 views

use of “of” or “from” when it comes to years

Which preposition is correct in this case? In the “Subdue” series of/from 2008, he photographed the daily life of urban centers. (The "Subdue" series is a series of photographs that was created in ...
2
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2answers
914 views

Delivery at home, at a home, in a home?

I've read an article and there's a sentence which confuses me: No matter if your delivery takes place in a home or at the hospital... If I rewrite it this way: No matter if your delivery takes ...
2
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0answers
413 views

Does this adverb prepositional phrase modify the adverb, or vice versa?

The McGraw Hill Handbook of English Grammar and Usage (pg. 42) gives "We got there late in the evening" as an example of an adverb prepositional phrase ('in the evening') modifying an adverb ('late'). ...
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0answers
2k views

What is the appropriate preposition of “Radio programme”?

So, in this sentence I listened to this conversation (On - In) a radio programme. What is the appropriate preposition to use?
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0answers
475 views

Ellipsis (Gapping) and Prepositions

A simple example of ellipsis is: Peter likes to eat apples, and Mary oranges. (Peter likes to eat apples, and Mary [likes to eat] oranges.) Recently, I've been engaged in a debate about a ...
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0answers
473 views

Usage of “of” prepositions sequence

Today, I have encountered the following sentence in a documentation: Department of development and support of information systems of ABC JSC I have argued about the correctness of using this "of"...
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0answers
3k views

Arrive “by” or “on” a specific train?

I happened to read a "programme of visit" of a foreign delegation which stated that the delegation would arrive in [name of city] by train H702. Obviously, H702 is the designation of a specific train. ...
2
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0answers
31 views

adverbials part II… I left the building with him…

Can one say a. I left the kitchen with the water running. b. I went to his house with my brother in jail. c. I went out of the bedroom with her naked. d. I left the building with my brother ...
2
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4answers
369 views

Why does “at work” make as much sense as “working” in this sentence?

I'm struggling to explain to someone why the following two sentences are both correct: "Students, though not necessarily working in the society, are also important members" "Students, though not ...
2
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1answer
64 views

Metaphors for Computation: Usage of “Before” and “Below”

Are "before" and "below" interchangeable? In context, the example is medical expenses before the AGI floor when the intended meaning apparently is medical expenses below the AGI floor The ...
2
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1answer
13k views

at / on/ in (the) (Math) exam

I think it is common to say I did well on the exam in AmE. I did well in the exam in BrE. Which prepositions are suitable for the following situations when we mention the exam we took? ...
2
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1answer
45 views

All I'm askin' / Is about the interesting preposition placement in the song “Respect”

The Aretha Franklin song "Respect" has the interesting lyric "All I'm askin' / Is for a little respect" [link] where in everyday English, I would expect "All I'm askin' for / Is a little respect". I'...
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3answers
692 views

'before' or 'in front of'?

Which sentence is the correct one? He parked his BMW directly before the diner. or He parked his BMW directly in front of the diner.
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22 views

On / with a low budget

I've got this piece of my text: In my humble opinion, a movie can be just as good and entertaining on a low budget with certain key elements. Is it correct to say 'on a low budget' or it's better ...
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1answer
42 views

Does “to tell apart” require “from” or “and”?

Which of the following sentences are incorrect and why? Is it okay to use "and" in these phrases? And should "apart" be moved to the end of the sentence? How to tell apart a raven from a crow? How to ...
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0answers
39 views

What's the difference between using “of” and using “with” when showing a cause?

What is the sense of a sentence when of and with are variously used to show the cause of something? He died of cancer. He was shivering with cold. Why isn’t it like this, or can it be? If it can be, ...
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1answer
30 views

Regarding parentheses and the end of sentence period, when the parentheses begin in 1 sentence but end after a second complete sentence?

“Jim likes bananas (as well as apples. He also likes most vegetables).” The finished sentence in the beginning of the parentheses, with 1 or more complete sentences after the partial sentence, all ...
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1answer
78 views

Is “entitled to” the same as “entitled as”?

I was listening to a philosophy video from the university of Queensland (on four dimensionalism view on fission) and at the end there was a paragraph that says: Since I am many, I survive as many, ...
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359 views

“Contributions by” or “from”?

The yearbook is made with love by Lisa, with contributions by Mary and Sal. or The yearbook is made with love by Lisa, with contributions from Mary and Sal.
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69 views

Escaping [one place] to [another] - sentence structure validity

I want to use the following phrase in this specific structure (if possible): How come social media is considered as a way for people to escape life when they sometimes escape social media to(?) ...
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0answers
104 views

Which preposition to use after “careless?”

Is there a difference in meaning or usage between careless with/about/of? I found dictionary examples of all three, but I failed to grasp the difference (if there is any): He was careless of ...
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0answers
35 views

“breaking the window” or “breaking of the window”

I've come across this: He insisted that he had nothing to do with breaking the window. Is it correct? Shouldn't use the preposition "of" between "breaking" and "the window"?
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41 views

Function of PPs with predicative complements

According to CaGEL* (e.g. p.636 ff), prepositions can take predicative complements, as in [1] She worked as a waitress [2] He passed for dead [3] I took you for granted [4] They left him for ...
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245 views

“Apply for” vs. “apply to”, a different case

The method A is applied for the determination of B. or The method A is applied to the determination of B. I often see these phrases in scientific texts. But which one is correct? There is ...
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0answers
24 views

do you always have to use “for” after the verb stay?

are "I stayed 10 days in Algeria" and I stayed for 10 days in Algeria" both correct? are "I stayed a month in Algeria" and I stayed for a month in Algeria" both correct? thanks for your help
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1answer
78 views

How many would you like to request it for?

Trying not to sound too ignorant while instructing a piece of software in order to allow people to make request of services/items and while trying to say "For how many people would you like to make ...
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0answers
34 views

Can a PP be analysed as a complex adjective?

In the sentence They are more familiar with this, the predicative complement more familiar with this is an AdjP, with the adjective head familiar. But what about a sentence such as They are more at ...
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0answers
389 views

Is there a symbol for “from”?

I am wondering if there is a symbol or glyph to represent the preposition "from". I doubt there is a formal, de jure symbol (i.e., found in any manual of style or dictionary), but I cannot even find ...
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0answers
58 views

Is it possible to say “to refund (an amount) to an order”?

I sent a Customer a partial refund. I want to inform her using the verb to refund + a preposition. Considering my native language, I would say I've just refunded $20 to your order. According to my ...
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0answers
63 views

How to use phrasal verbs with prepositions without thinking which i have to use

I am frustrated about unawareness how to use up/down/with etc. with phrasal verbs properly.Being from Ukraine can't really understand if it means something or it is just a combination of words. So, my ...
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0answers
90 views

Never pre-positive adjectives and intransitive prepositions

The accepted response to an earlier question concerning words like alone, asleep and alive places such words in the category of adjectives that simply don't occur in front of the nouns or noun phrases ...
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0answers
39 views

What is this gerund construction called?

In English the constructing for plus a corresponding gerund is often used, usually to identify a motivation for the main action (it seems to be more prevalent in colloquial speech); e.g.: I thank ...
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699 views

“Paper is used for writing on ”or “paper is used for writing”,which one is grammatically correct?

"Paper is used for writing on "or "paper is used for writing",which one is grammatically correct ? Chopstics are used for eating . Chopstics are used for eaing with. This desk is used for putting ...
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0answers
397 views

Difference between “too long” and “for too long”

What is the difference between "too long" and "for too long" For example the ones below You can't stay under water for too long Or You can't stay under water too long Do not have that candy in ...
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0answers
28 views

what different between the ‘at postgraduate level' and 'in postgraduate level'?

what different between the ‘at postgraduate level' and 'in postgraduate level'? which one is correct? Is that have the same meaning in two different preposition situation.
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1answer
41 views

Prepositions for the word “placement” or “clinical placement”

Which of these is correct? I went to cardiac ward in my first clinical placement. I went to cardiac ward for my first clinical placement. I went to cardiac ward on my first clinical placement. Also,...