Questions tagged [prepositions]

Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition. Questions need to include enough information for the intended meaning to be deduced.

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23 views

Difference between “I don't understand this with, in, about”

There was a post today on a forum for learners of English. The title was "I don't understand this with girls really" and a picture added below. The context of the picture was in two situations, one ...
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0answers
30 views

made of VS made from (not duplicate, tricky one)

Here I would like to ask a question about the usage of made of and made from. I know the issue has been discussed on this forum many times before, but this time I would like to ask a tricky question ...
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22 views

On / with a low budget

I've got this piece of my text: In my humble opinion, a movie can be just as good and entertaining on a low budget with certain key elements. Is it correct to say 'on a low budget' or it's better ...
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1answer
25 views

Is “falls on” the right term in this sentence?

Is "falls on" the right term in this sentence? Should it be "falls to"? I think it sounds incorrect to me — success doesn’t "fall on" some action, right? — but I can't put my finger on what should be ...
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1answer
78 views

Sita was married by Rama

1.Rama married Sita 2.Sita was married by Rama " The Teacher's Travelogue " prepared by the Regional Institute of India, Banglore discussed the use of active and passive voice. It goes on to say ...
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1answer
33 views

“Shaded with green” vs “shaded by green” as adjective? [on hold]

I'm really not sure what's the difference, both seem right. The meaning is that the object has a shade of green upon it.
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1answer
31 views

What preposition should I use in this phrase?

I wnat to say 'this ilness invoves women who are in their fertility age'. Which preposition is appropriate? Should I use related to or relating to which is an inflammatory disease RELATING TO/ ...
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2answers
63 views

What's the meaning of “to” in “Love you to”? [on hold]

There's a Beatles song called "Love You To" (not To Love You nor Love You Too). I've never understood this grammar construction and I don't understand what the title actually means. Is it just a ...
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9answers
11k views

Is “I am getting married with my sister” ambiguous?

I have seen the following sentences in a book given to us during our training period at The Regional Institute of English, Bangluru I got married to Priscilla. I got married with Priscilla ...
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21 views

“The monster within me” vs “The monster in me”

Can you teach me some example about using prepositions "The monster within me" vs "The monster in me" vs "The monster with me" "The monster on me" vs "The monster onto me" vs "The monster into me"
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12 views

Prepositions to express measurement

When one wants to say that the depth of the room is less than 14 feet, which of the following preposition is more appropriate - The depth of room is just below 14 feet. The depth of room is just in ...
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2answers
37 views

Stay tuned on or to? Which one is correct?

I have seen both usages. Stay tuned on our Facebook page to know more Stay tuned to our Facebook page to know more But don’t know which one is more appropriate. Please help me figure it out. ...
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0answers
30 views

What's the grammatical principle behind the use of 'for' with an adjective?

The following common expressions are in the form of for in conjunction with an adjective: (give/take) for granted (leave) for dead for better/worse for sure/certain There doesn't seem to be anything ...
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1answer
42 views

Does “to tell apart” require “from” or “and”?

Which of the following sentences are incorrect and why? Is it okay to use "and" in these phrases? And should "apart" be moved to the end of the sentence? How to tell apart a raven from a crow? How to ...
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1answer
63 views

being usages dilemma

I've read in BBC that we use use "being" as a verb-ing. BBC has listed two kinds of usage; what I want to learn about here is the "preposition + verb-ing" usage. It has been said that "being + past ...
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45 views

Dissatisfaction with/at - which one is correct?

I am writing to express my complete dissatisfaction with the meal I was served last night. I am writing to express my complete dissatisfaction at the meal I was served last night. Which one ...
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1answer
24 views

Frequency/quantity in a/one month

Please consider the following: There are four seasons IN a year I do it five times IN a year The girls meet me twice a month He smoked five cigarettes IN a day They finish five books a ...
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35 views

Does 'to' function as a preposition in 'the trick to getting this chair to fold' but in a to-infinitive in 'some tricks to speed up your …'? [migrated]

In a dictionary, I find two example sentences of the use of "trick": What's the trick to getting this chair to fold up? On page 21, some tricks to speed up your beauty routine. As we know, "...
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1answer
47 views

Difference between “safe from” vs “safe of” something

When indicating that something is secured from something dangerous it is possible to say that it is safe from something. For example, you might say Properly kept farm animals are safe from ...
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43 views

Repeating “for” after “especially” [closed]

Let's imagine a sentence such as Fasting is good for health and, especially, being hungry. Should I repeat the "for" preposition after "especially"? Thanks.
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14 views

(for) any longer [migrated]

Is 'for' necessary before 'any longer', or at all? I won't be able to talk (for) any longer. I can't talk (for) any longer. I can't workout (for) any longer.
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1answer
34 views

Which preposition is to be used before “participation” — in or on?

I read a sentence in Word by Word by Kory Stamper which was: I had one social studies teacher who proclaimed to us on the first day of class that everyone was expected to speak "correct and proper ...
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1answer
31 views

When to use a particular preposition

Is there a rule that determines when a particular preposition is used? For example, in the following sentences: “for signing” versus “to signing” and “for playing” versus “to playing”. He was ...
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1answer
37 views

Need help with a grammar question about prepositions [duplicate]

Is “to” in the following examples a preposition, or does it act as part of the verb (to obtain, to sign, to complete)? Many thanks! ▻ I finally managed to obtain a copy of the report. ▻ Both ...
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1answer
40 views

In a car or on a car? [closed]

I know that normally we say travel by car or in a car, but would it be acceptable to say 'on a car'?
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3answers
5k views

Why is it “on the inside” and not “in the inside”?

The expression "in the inside" appears to be logical (because insides are closed spaces with boundaries) but the more common expression is "on the inside." What’s the reason behind this usage?
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1answer
102 views

“Born in a City” or “Born at a City”? Uncommon Usage by Edward FitzGerald [duplicate]

I was reading Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, translated by Edward FitzGerald. In introduction, the translator writes: Khayyam was born at Naishapur. I always thought that we needed to use in in such a ...
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3answers
72 views

Preposition after 'deluged'

I am aware that the word deluged means two things: Flooded with water Overwhelmed The question I want to ask is its usage in a sentence. Would I say 'deluged with' or 'deluged by' something? In ...
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30 views

High or high up?

Who installs a power outlet that high? Could I say just high in this sentence as opposed to high up? Does high up distinguish the meaning from being misunderstood as if you were intoxicated? Is it ...
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1answer
35 views

grandfather of or to two children? [closed]

What do these mean? He's a grandfather of two. He's a grandfather to two.
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1answer
76 views

Why does “on top of” lack of an article before “top”? [closed]

I read in a children's book, Bliff’s fun phonics: "The duck is on top." "Top" is supposed to be countable. Why is there not an article before "top" in the phrase?
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1answer
36 views

subscribing of or subscribing to?

I received a Location error on a website that suggests me to try subscribing of Romania's service when within its boundaries Basically I'm trying to subscribe to a Romanian service, but I'm not in ...
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1answer
55 views

Are the commas necessary in this type of sentence?

Here's the sentence: From what I could see, Brom's facial expression turned from a neutral look, to a surprised one, and then to displeasure. I feel that no commas are necessary when in the form, "...
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24 views

ease of OR ease for [closed]

The feature is popular because of its ease of/for automation. What is the correct choice in the given example? Is there some rule when to use of or for?
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2answers
42 views

The difference between be aimed at and aim to?

According to Longman, I think I can use "aimed at ing" and "aiming to v" both. GRAMMAR: Patterns with aim • You aim to do something: I aim to study medicine. ✗Don’t say: I aim at ...
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1answer
31 views

What is correct in the following sentences? [closed]

The system shows 79 pcs in stock from the previous version of the V95830 harness. The system shows 79 pcs in stock of the previous version of the V95830 harness.
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38 views

Form of a verb relating to a subject referred to by a preposition

In this sentence: The security system comprises a complex network of specialized detectors that protect against temperature fluctuations, eliminate dust particles, and regulate humidity, thus ...
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1answer
32 views

discount to vs discount off vs discount off of vs dicount from

To get the full A app company experience, we recommend you upgrade to our paid version (at a substantial discount TO list price). I found that sentence on a website of an app company and the ...
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1answer
76 views

“In the process” VS “During the process”

Below are some sentences involved these two phrases. Could "during" and "in" be replaced by each other? During the process the permeability damage to coal reservoirs caused during the development ...
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22 views

“to invest in the seed round of XYZ” vs “to invest at the seed round of XYZ”

In June of 2017, she financed with $1 million the seed round of XYZ. In June of 2017, she invested $1 million in the seed round of XYZ. In June of 2017, she invested $1 million at the seed round of ...
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1answer
92 views

Origin of the saying 'It's a soda'?

We say that something is easy (in Australia at least) by saying that 'it's a soda?' What is the origin of this please? Why soda?
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1answer
14 views

Drafting (of) reports

I want to say that: "I contributed to drafting proposals", and unsure if I use a preposition after "drafting"... Thanks! The website wants more symbols, so I keep typing. In fact, I am quite sure ...
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0answers
88 views

proceed to/with the next step

What is the difference between these two phrases? proceed to the next step proceed with the next step By intuition, I would say that proceed with lays the focus on what will be proceeded with ...
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0answers
25 views

Correct use of the noun “compromise”

Is the noun "compromise," as part of the usage "compromise with," correct in the following sentence? It seems it is stating the opposite of what it intends. Anyone seeking compromise with the ...
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1answer
66 views

Using the preposition For to indicate a purpose

I am curious to know if the usage of "for" in the sentence below is grammatical? The reason why “socioeconomical understanding” is chosen as the umbrella section is for it to mediate the ...
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0answers
30 views

Semicolon between independent and dependent clause?

I saw the following sentence in the NY Times: “The Jarheads lost more people that day than Mr. Ribeiro’s combat unit lost in the first gulf war; so many that it had been impossible to attend all of ...
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11 views

noun + <of> + the size/etc of

1. Somebody (of) her age shouldn't do such strenuous exercises. 2. We saw a giant jellyfish (of) the same size as an adult human. 3. I have a dog (of) the size of yours. 4. A flock of ...
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1answer
70 views

Changing of phrasal verbs by tenses [closed]

Probably that is extremely strange question , but can I change pharasal verbs by tenses ? There is no something else information at the most popular resources . For example , break down Past ...
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1answer
26 views

Is it 'Save time IN your morning routine' or 'Save time ON your morning routine'?

I need help on this. Do I say Save time in your morning routine or Save time on your morning routine ? The context: a beauty procedure that simplifies women's makeup routine. Thank you for ...
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0answers
45 views

PhD at University X or PhD from University X [duplicate]

I wish to present my education for a potential employer. If I had the chance to phrase a whole sentence, I would go for "I received my PhD from University X", as suggested in other answers to related ...