Questions tagged [prepositions]

Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition. Questions need to include enough information for the intended meaning to be deduced.

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33 views

Which preposition should I use when referring to a date expressed as an ISO short date (yyyy-MM-dd)? [closed]

The exact sentence I need help with is this one: In case this was just due to a temporary glitch, we will retry the payment on 2021-06-23. I would like to express that the retry will take place at ...
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36 views

Is this correct: “The sun glared into his eyes”? [closed]

The full sentence is: The sun glared into his eyes, making it difficult to concentrate on the path ahead. I would like to know whether 'into' is the right preposition to use with 'glare' in this ...
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19 views

Conclude without an “on” preposition? [migrated]

I'm not a native speaker but I was under the impression that when you want to say that an event concludes on a certain date you can't omit the "on". However, a native speaker told me that ...
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33 views

I wonder whether the following these sentences have different meanings; It was foolish for(or of) him to take that expensive house [closed]

It was foolish for him to take that expensive house. It was foolish of him to take that expensive house. I wonder whether these two sentences are same or not. I'd appreciate your help. Thank you.
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20 views

Should I use “in“ or "of”? [closed]

I would like to know whether I should use “in” when I want to say ‘the scientist in the Sputnik era’ or “of” as in ‘the scientist of the Sputnik era’? Could you share your ideas please?
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Meaning of the phrase “ for use in” [closed]

Switches For use in radio apparatus, electrical instruments, electrical machinery, electrical appliances and the like. Does this mean switches are used inside or on those apparatus, or switch are used ...
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1answer
35 views

Use of preposition With [closed]

Apart from the obvious toll the pandemic has taken on public health, with lives lost and health care facilities stretched to breaking point, there have been alarming ramifications for children in USA. ...
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1answer
56 views

The missing “to” in the phrase “subject to”

I learned that when referring one thing is subject to another thing, a "to" should always be there next to "subject" or before a which/that, etc. However, in the below language, ...
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10 views

My English teacher says “I bought a car to my sister” means that my sister sold me a car. Is that sentence grammatically correct? [migrated]

My English teacher was trying to explain the difference between "I bought a car for my sister" and "I bought a car to my sister", but I don't think the latter is correct. By the ...
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1answer
22 views

Which is the correct phrase to use? On the app or to the app

The context is "What kind of a book can be added on the app/ to the app?" When I typed the sentence "What kind of a book can be added on the app?" on Grammarly it was autocorrected ...
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1answer
42 views

“A pun of X” or “a pun based upon X”?

In the following phrase, I am unsure of my usage of the word "of". The protocol name µDP (pronounced mew-dee-pee) is a pun of multicast UDP. Is it said that something is a pun of something ...
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I am confused with the usage of word 'by' [migrated]

I read a sentence : Have you ever been bitten by a dog? but usually when we use 'by' we don't put a/the/my before noun. Can somebody explain me why we did that here?
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1answer
30 views

Preposition needed: did not survive a certain timepoint [closed]

I have a sentence as follows. This should say that the patients who died during the observation period were excluded from analyses. Should I use a preposition after "survive"? I did a ...
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1answer
35 views

I will set up a call on next Thursday - acceptable? Or “for”? [closed]

I am not sure whether the "on" preposition is correct in this case, and whether the sentence itself makes sense: can't it be interpreted that I will set up the call next Thursday (when ...
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What is right preposition to use before a location? [duplicate]

What preposition should I use here? Your initial place of posting shall be in the office located ____ A. Bonifacio St. Brgy. Canlalay Biñan City.
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1answer
49 views

Circle “with radius” vs. “of radius” [closed]

Are both of there correct? Circle with radius r = 1 cm. Circle of radius r = 1 cm. I do not want to use other sentences such as "Radius of a circle is r = 1 cm."
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Using “to” as a function word to indicate the result of an action or a process

I encountered a sentence as follows: To the audience's consternation, the corpse began to speak. A bit of googling, brought about this result for the definitions of to from Merriam-Webster: b—used ...
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2answers
29 views

How to say: work (in/at/on/?) your hours

My intention is to let a person (i.e. my employee), whom I'm talking to, to choose his/her work hours. For example: Employee: I'm going to do this task between 1-4 pm today. Me: Sure, no problem. Work ...
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1answer
84 views

Prepostions followed by that-clauses

It’s commonly said that prepositions take declarative clauses without that. However: The apartment is nice except that the rent is too high. You can't always count on it that someone will help. It ...
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1answer
45 views

Is this use of up to correct? [closed]

I came across this doubt. If I want to say, for example. "This inventor is a genius, he can create from a simple chair up to a sophisticated car engine" Is that correct? I don't know how ...
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40 views

both (the) X and (the) Y

Which of the three alternatives is correct (or recommended)? "in both the military and civil fields"; "in both military and civil fields"; "in both the military and the civil ...
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1answer
109 views

Reference Request on Preposition Fronting

Currently reading "A Student's Introduction to English Grammar" by Geoffrey K. Pullum and Rodney Huddleston. Consider the following contrast between the phrasal verbs ask for and come across....
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1answer
50 views

What is the difference between “suffer for” and “suffer from”?

I have a question about "I've suffered for my sins." why is used "suffered for", not "suffered from"?
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2answers
35 views

Which preposition to use with the word 'divest'? (Should it be 'divest of,' 'divest from,' or no preposition at all?)

I am wondering which preposition would best fit this usage of the word divest. In this case, the word is being used in the third subsense of the first sense found in Merriam-Webster: a : to deprive ...
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2answers
43 views

Do you need to use “as” with “brand” or “rebrand”?

Do you need to use "as" with brand or rebrand? Here's an example: Company X rebranded itself as the Smart Brand. Company X rebranded itself the Smart Brand. Which is correct? Or are they ...
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1answer
48 views

Is it possible put a preposition in front of a relative pronoun what? [closed]

She believed what I was talking about. She believed about what I was talking. I believe the sentence 1 is grammatically correct, but I'm not sure about the sentence 2. Is that okay, too? Thank you.
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32 views

“Book something on a date” or “book for a date”

Do I use on or for with a single date? I would like to book annual leave on 08/08/2021 I would like to book annual leave for 08/08/2021
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1answer
38 views

The meaning of word “FOR” at the beginning of sentence [duplicate]

I met some odd usage of preposition "for". I guess it's old style, or high style. I give examples for better understanding: About this time legend among the Hobbits first becomes history ...
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1answer
30 views

“Covered in” or “Covered with” trash [duplicate]

The mountain is covered in trash The mountain is covered with trash I find both of them correct but I can't say for sure. Is "covered in" or "covered with" more suitable in this ...
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23 views

Of vs For in “The Institute of/for Wildlife Research”

Is there a difference between saying: The Institute for Wildlife Research and The Institute of Wildlife Research
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2answers
41 views

Through the ocean or in the ocean [closed]

In an essay should say I swim in the ocean or through the ocean. For sailing what should we say?
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47 views

“Minister for” and “Ministry of”

In some British Commonwealth countries, e.g. Singapore, government ministries are named "Ministry of", as in "Ministry of Defence". However, the title of the minister in charge is &...
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47 views

Difference between “besides”, “apart from” and “except for”. Prepositions vs adverbials

I am studying discourse markers and ended up checking online (in crownacademyenglish) about the difference between these expressions. Firstly, this website affirms that they are prepositions, which I ...
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22 views

Which word does with modify here?

I have a question on whether the below is grammatically correct : "Imagine breaking the door of the man with the hand that feeds you" The intention is along the lines of "That man feeds ...
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1answer
48 views

“With probability”, “with a probability”, “with the probability”?

As a mathematician, I often write and read about probabilities. In the literature, I've seen versions of all the sentences below. Which one is correct? This happens with probability (of) 30%. This ...
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24 views

Should a prepositional phrase beginning with “of” that follows a plural noun be singular or plural?

Which of these is correct? “Types of citrus fruit” or “types of citrus fruits”? I suspect it is the first example, but I would really like to know what the grammar rule governing these situations ...
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6 views

Asking for 'experience at X place' implies only timespan or also details of the experience it self?

In the application form of a internship one of the fields states Experience at (current work place) with no additional information. The field allows for a more than one-line answer and I am not pretty ...
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1answer
25 views

Is “You can invite the user to the workspace with the admin role.” grammatically correct?

The following sentence looks awkward to me: You can invite the user to the workspace with the admin role. I think a good way to put it should be: You can invite the user to the workspace and assign ...
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2answers
47 views

Do I include “that” or leave it out when used adjacent to “whatever, whereever, etc.” such as in the following example?

"Advantages of whatever THAT happens always outweigh the costs" Grammarly underlines THAT as red to leave it out. I know that when I say "whatever happens, I will be there for you" ...
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49 views

Is a man a consort of a queen, or to a queen? [closed]

Consort of, or to? Would we say "the Consort of Queen Elizabeth" or "the Consort to Queen Elizabeth"?
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1answer
47 views

With or without FOR? “The last thing I want is (FOR) anyone to…”

I am doing Proficiency exam practice and came across the following sentence transformation: As you can see, according to the answer key, my answer is wrong. However, I did some research and found out ...
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1answer
59 views

'At a time' or 'in a time'

In the phrase The quantity of insects in/at a time t is given by i(t). What is the correct? Thank you so much!
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18 views

Preposition use: targeted on/at distinct patient populations [closed]

Should I go for on or at? To guide policymaking, high-quality systems-level research targeted on distinct patient populations is needed. To guide policymaking, high-quality systems-level research ...
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40 views

What is the correct preposition for searching items?

I am confused about prepositions for searching in [n] count of items. For example, we have 1000 items, users can search and find an item, but which preposition fits this meaning well? Search in 1000 ...
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36 views

Usage of “of” with an implicit object

Consider this sentence from an article about a killing: “Based on repeated threats on the night of, they (Rose, Ford and Liakos) decided to go on a scouting mission that was preserved on video,” ...
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2answers
54 views

When to use (or not use) commas in a sentence with conditions

Current Sentence: The steps in this procedure must be performed chronologically until the card has been found, or all the steps have been exhausted, and an adjustment to the system must be made. ...
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2answers
76 views

A “conjecture on” or a “conjecture about”?

As a non-English scientist, the question bothers me. Maybe the answer depends on the context? Allow me to give a few examples. These are titles of a short text: Is it better to say "A conjecture ...
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2answers
68 views

Are there any verbs that accept multiple prepositions and as a result differ in meaning?

In some languages there are particular verbs that can be used both with and without a preposition. In some of these cases, the verb also accepts multiple prepositions. Example 1: Below is an example ...
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25 views

Usage of it and them with the same noun

Here is an example situation where the noun refers to something in general- (General statement) The coconut tree is my favourite tree. It can grow up to a height of 25 meters. (1) I used to climb them ...
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19 views

Preposition to vs. into

As I'm not an ELL, I'm posting this question here. It seems that both are grammatically correct: "Please send those documents into my e-mail" "Please send those documents to my e-mail&...

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