Questions tagged [prepositions]

Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition. Questions need to include enough information for the intended meaning to be deduced.

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What is meaning of for in "for Christmas"? [closed]

What do you buy for Christmas? We are going to buy a turkey for Christmas? What is the meaning of for?Something for Christmas means something to celebrate Christmas?
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What is the meaning of " grappling with disparate answers"? [closed]

How frequent is long COVID? And how much protection do vaccines give against it? Why the public and policymakers are grappling with disparate answers to these basic questions? What is the meaning of &...
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executive secretary [duplicate]

When I look up my dictionaries for 'executive secretary', I found the below 2 examples: She’s executive secretary to New York University’s president. He was executive secretary of the NAACP. I have 3 ...
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Modal verb and conjunction usage in a sentence [closed]

Consider the following sentence: Forgiveness should not be granted but asked for. Is this sentence grammatically correct? If not, is it possible to see the rules governing this type of sentences?
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13 votes
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Can "due" meaning "owed" be used without "to" in AmE? e.g. "the recognition which was due her"

Encountered the following in a text I'm proofreading. ...tries to salvage the dignity due the situation My instinct is to correct this to ...tries to salvage the dignity due to the situation but ...
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2 answers
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"Lecture notes in" or "Lecture notes on"

I have seen both options used interchangeably, is there a reason why? Example with on: https://www.springer.com/series/15362 Lecture Notes on Data Engineering and Communications Technologies ...
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Difference between "across the year" and "throughout the year"?

I have heard people saying these two phrases, do they have any difference from each other? For example I have accomplished a lot across the year. and I have accomplished a lot throughout the year. ...
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Usage of the phrase "to which" in this mathematical explanation

I'm sure I am overthinking this, but I wanted to understand this explanation better (and in turn, be able to explain it to students better). Observe the following explanation of a function in ...
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1 answer
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What is the best preposition in this sentence? "Since the 1960s, ——— the ascent of Noam Chomsky, the consensus has been that

What is the best preposition for this sentence and why? The full sentence is: Since the 1960s, ——— the ascent of thinkers like Noam Chomsky, the consensus has been that linguistic differences don't ...
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throwing roses in the museum gallery to slack-jawed guests

The Associated Press (AP) has printed the following story, where the boldfaced "to" is used: PARIS (AP) — A man seemingly disguised as an old woman in a wheelchair threw a piece of cake at ...
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Grammatical correctness of "He hasn't punished one of them— not one of them— since baby is born," [duplicate]

So I was reading a story called 'Desiree's Baby' and I saw this sentence appear, when one character (Desiree) was telling her mother that her husband was so happy upon the birth of her child, that he ...
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"input to your method" or "input for your method"?

Which of the two is correct: "Is this a valid input to your method?" "Is this a valid input for your method?" In this context, a method is a function with a set of parameters ...
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2 votes
2 answers
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How do I know what to use "in society" or "on society"? [closed]

Grammarly sometimes says "in society" is correct, but sometimes it says "on society" is correct. "In my opinion, using animals for scientific and commercial experiments has ...
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[noun]+of+[noun] vs. [noun]+[noun] [duplicate]

What's the difference between these two structures? For example, take a look at this sentence: "The flow of fuel in an old machine like mine is regulated by a carburetor, which draws fuel into ...
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1 vote
3 answers
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"have been adopted to" vs "have been adopted for" [closed]

I am not sure whether I should use "to" or "for" here: Machine learning methods have been widely adopted to classify images? Or Machine learning methods have been widely adopted ...
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I dropped my glasses. Would I say "My glasses fell on the floor" or "My glasses fell to the floor" [duplicate]

Are 'fell to' and 'fell on' equivalent? What are the contexts in which they are both used?
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1 answer
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Restating preposition in a conjunctive phrase to avoid ambiguity

Take the following sentence: This study analyzed how perceptions of poverty and welfare policies influence social movements in the US. My first interpretation, and I suspect the first interpretation ...
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Confusing use of 'to' preposition [closed]

Recently I came across a technical article. It had following section heading: Forwarding references to DOM components If we see the statement in isolation, without surrounding text, which of the ...
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Which preposition is correct to anticipate the noun phrase 'Instagram post'?

When we talk about photos, it's 'in' the correct preposition to use (see English Grammar In Use, p.248). However, is it 'in' or 'on' when expressing a situation like 'There is a beautiful woman in/on ...
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2 answers
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Difference between 'far', far off' and 'far out'? [closed]

I am a native Spanish speaker and this is getting me really frustrated. Online dictionaries all give the same meaning for all these far + prep expressions, all say the same thing "a great ...
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0 answers
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Is there a difference between "care about" one vs "care for" one?

One person says:"You don't care about me!" Another replies: "I care deeply for you." Instead of replying "I care deeply about you," the replier says "I care deeply ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
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Which is correct, "opt out of" or "opt out from" and why?

Which is correct, opt out of or opt out from and why? Eg. This customer has opted out of this programme OR This customer has opted out from this programme Both prepositions are used in Wikipedia: ...
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1 answer
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Can I use the preposition "for" with the meaning of support or agreement in this sentence?

The sentence is as below, The discovery is being resisted by many people for exploiting fetal tissue. It seems more appropriate to interpret it as below, "exploiting fetal tissue" is the ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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Fit verb followed by in preposition

I have a question regarding the usage of the verb "fit", especially when followed by the preposition "in". Now I am aware that there is a "fit in" (as in to become ...
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1 answer
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Should I separate multiple "ands" in a series with commas? [closed]

I enjoy eating apples and cherries and pears and bananas. OR I enjoy eating apples, and cherries, and pears, and bananas. I apologize if this question was listed somewhere else, but I can't find a ...
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charge $10 from/to me?

Double-object verbs can be used in two structures, e.g. He gave me this book. = He gave this book to me. What about 'charge' (in the sense of asking for payment)? For 'They charged me $10.', what ...
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Identified by or Identified as

I wish to write that some variables in a scientific document can be respectively identified (as/by) some values... For instance, ...where a,b and c correspond to the energies the spinor and the ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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"By pencil" vs "in pencil"

Is there any difference between "The letter was written by pencil" and "The letter was written in pencil" ?
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2 answers
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Is it "visit to my country" or "visit my country"? [closed]

Which one is correct or are they both correct? End of this year, I've a plan to visit my country. Or, End of this year, I've a plan to visit to my country.
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'Tears for' or 'Tears of'?

I was trying to write some poetry and I wonder if I can say: Perch on my lashes My tears for the wrench. I am talking about the last line. Can we say "tears for something" like "tears ...
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Can "in" be left out in "I have experience in leading teams"?

I was writing a cover letter for a job, and I'm hesitating between "I have experience leading teams" and "I have experience in leading teams." Can in be left out? If it can (or if ...
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2 answers
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Does "by year X" include year X?

A politician promises to, say, plant 1,000 trees "by 2022". Will one be able to tell if the promise was fulfilled on January 1, 2022 or on January 1, 2023?
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3 answers
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"close resemblance in/on ..." OR "closely resembling ..." [closed]

I have two quite similar fracture populations and I try to emphasize this in the following sentence. But which of the prepositions/solutions is correct in British English? The baseline ...
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The use of "Between" in dates. Which days are included? [duplicate]

When writing on a certificate "between the 28th March and the 9th April" does it mean the same as "from the 28th March to the 9th April" ?
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1 answer
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Is it necessary to write "by" before a percent increase? [duplicate]

In the sentence, "Immigration increased by 28%", would the "by" be correct or could the sentence read, "Immigration increased 28%"?
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1 vote
1 answer
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Who vs whom in "many of { } are yet to be born" [duplicate]

I understand that when "those" is referred to as the subject of the verb we use "whom", and when "they" is the object we use "who". But consider the following ...
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3 votes
2 answers
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What Greek preposition is in “exorcism”, “ek” or “ex”?

I realize this may not be typical for this forum, but I have seen the term translated to English in another post. I find exorcism explained with "ek" with the verb "horkizo” The word “...
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Preposition and article prior to dates - UK vs US differences

In the lead of the Wikipedia article on the JWST, I notice the following fragment: It was launched 25 December 2021… As a Brit, I recognize that as an American form. In the UK, we'd tend to use, &...
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"Sought for" at the end of a sentence

Does anyone know if "sought for" can be used at the end of a clause, phrase, or sentence, even if "for" might be redundant? I'm not speaking of "sought for [something]", ...
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3 votes
1 answer
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What are the different rules for capitalization of prepositions in titles? [closed]

There are probably different rules for different style guides, but I do have one question. I have heard that the general rule is that any preposition less than four letters does not get capitalized, ...
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What is the meaning of "We should complete it by this weekend"? [duplicate]

We assume that Saturday and Sunday are the weekend, so I am confused about the meaning of "by this weekend". If for example in a sentence: "We should still complete the paper by this ...
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'in the development' or 'with the development' [duplicate]

I have the following sentence: His main task is to help us with / in the development of new methods.
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1 vote
3 answers
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"Like" as a preposition

I know that 'like' can function as a preposition, but I want your views on this statement: A collection, like old rocks or unique autos, gives a person some individuality. I think 'like' functions ...
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2 answers
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"Looking right at............" is it correct to say that?

If I want to describe a place that is straight in front of a building, can I say that this place is "looking right at" that building?
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1 answer
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Usage of prepositions “of” and “for” in a title

I am puzzled by the title of my academic thesis. It can be entitled as Research on Key Technologies of Implementing xxx. or Research on Key Technologies for Implementing xxx. I mean we develop the ...
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1 answer
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What does "under me" mean in this passage?

Could you tell me what "under me" means in the following passage? "And does Mr. Rackstraw look after that [=occult stuff] too?" asked Colquhoun. "Well, some of it," the ...
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Prepostition 'as to' in poetry

So I ran accross this line in a poem of Alexander Pope: Vice is a monster of so frightful mien As to be hated needs but to be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then ...
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2 answers
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'Just like she does'..........is it used properly in this sentence? [duplicate]

She didn’t show the workings in the math exam, she just tried to guess the answers just like she does in the homework. I am not sure if 'just like she does' makes sense. If not what can I use ...
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Is the usage of "as" in this sentence valid? [closed]

It is from this webpage: In response to my offhand remark that the kernel densities in the article by Chen and Rodden are “tacky” and would be much better as histograms, commenter Anne asks:... It ...
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Is the omission of the preposition before the day of the week grammatically correct when the noun is directly preceded by a verb?

I have seen the sentence structure verb + day of the week (which skips the usual "on" preposition splitting the phrase) appearing here and there, e.g., in CNN's article noted below: The ...
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