Questions tagged [prepositions]

Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition. Questions need to include enough information for the intended meaning to be deduced.

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3
votes
1answer
5k views

“At” or “in”: Places [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: "Got it at" or "Got it in?" When referring to a place, when does one use the preposition "at" and when "in" (such as "at school" versus "in school")?
16
votes
4answers
376k views

“I would like to ask you a favour” vs. “I would like to ask you for a favour”

Which form is to be preferred? I would like to ask you a favour. I would like to ask you for a favour.
3
votes
3answers
5k views

Can “off” and “from” be used interchangeably? [closed]

I am wondering if "Off" and "From" can be used interchangeably? Such as: I am taking this note off the document. I am taking this note from the document.
19
votes
9answers
61k views

Difference between “without” and “with no”

What is the difference between the usage of without and with no? For example, without sound and with no sound.
2
votes
6answers
7k views

“Arnold raced out of the door”: grammatical or not?

Arnold raced out of the door, and started... In its time, it was once reported, this was one of the most often-read lines of fiction in the English language: it is the sentence fragment shown in a ...
8
votes
3answers
1k views

"Programs running in/on machine”

Which preposition should be used in the following sentence? All of my programs are running in/on a 16-core machine. Google shows both options.
7
votes
3answers
50k views

“In the outskirts” versus “on the outskirts”

Which of the following sentences is correct, and why? I bought a house in the outskirts of the city. I bought a house on the outskirts of the city.
4
votes
3answers
9k views

“Agreed” or “agreed to”

Should agreed or agreed to be used in the example below? The member countries agreed the bailout package for the sovereign. NATO will enforce the sanctions agreed in May. The member countries agreed ...
2
votes
2answers
449 views

Should I use “in” or “on”?

Which is the correct form in this sentence: "in" or "on"? "I'm sending you the requested permission for using my photographs in/on your project"
2
votes
3answers
5k views

Can I say “medium-term”, as with the adjectives “short-term” and “long-term”? Do they need prepositions?

I would like to use an adjective to express something in between the two adjectives short-term and long-term. Does medium-term make sense here? What is the adjective I can use? What preposition, if ...
54
votes
1answer
158k views

Independent/independently of/from

Which of these are correct, and why? Suggestions for rephrasing it are also welcome. [noun] was developed independently of [noun] [noun] was developed independently from [noun] [noun] was developed, ...
6
votes
1answer
16k views

“In 15 minutes” or “15 minutes later”?

Several years ago, when I was watching a show, it was 15:45 and the show started at 16:00. A foreigner asked me: "When will this show start?" My English is not good, and I never talked to foreigners. ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

“Lyrics to a song” vs. “lyrics of a song” [duplicate]

I've seen both being used interchangeably. Are both valid? Is only one correct? Lyrics to a song. Lyrics of a song.
6
votes
4answers
98k views

Does the phrase “who's in?” or “I'm in!” exist in (informal) English?

I really think I've heard it in some American sitcom/sitcoms, meaning something like participating in. "I want to play football. Who's in?" — "Great idea, I'm in!" Does it really exist, or am I wrong? ...
5
votes
1answer
541 views

Preposition to use with “concordance”

Do you say concordance of A and B, concordance of A with B, concordance between A and B, or something else?
13
votes
8answers
140k views

Does “until [date]” mean “before that date”?

What does until mean in the following? You need to deliver this product within 2 days (until August 18, 2011) to meet your deadline and get paid. Does this mean that I have to deliver the ...
7
votes
2answers
86k views

“Interfere in” vs. “interfere with”

I was taught that when interfere is followed by in, it means to get involved in something that doesn't concern you; when followed by with, it means to prevent something from being done. And this is ...
56
votes
7answers
92k views

“between” vs. “among”

Today I was cut off in the middle of the following sentence: Between Cook, Strauss, and Pietersen— My friend said I was wrong. He said that for more than two entities, among/amongst are used, and ...
12
votes
4answers
161k views

“Fine with/by/to you/that”

Are there any differences when asking the following? Would that be fine with you? Would that be fine by you? Would that be fine to you? What if we switch you and that around? Do they still make ...
2
votes
3answers
3k views

What is the difference between “an essay on something” and “an essay in something”?

In most cases you write "an essay on something" but recently I came across some "essays in something" Is there a difference in meaning? Is the "in" more formal?
-2
votes
2answers
2k views

“Win the lottery”, “win a lottery”, “win lottery” [closed]

Should it be win the lottery or win a lottery or just win lottery? The sentences below sound the same to me. Are they? I lost $5000 to lottery. I lost $5000 for lottery.
10
votes
4answers
334k views

“On the last week” or “In the last week”?

I'm planning a trip. My plane lands on the 29th of August. Should I say: I'll arrive on the last week of August. or I'll arrive in the last week of August. Web searches show that both ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

What is the meaning of “upon” here?

In the New York Times: "And it worked — boy, did it work. Visitors flooded Hulu upon its public opening in March 2008." Dictionary.com: 4. immediately or very soon after 5. on the ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

“Got it at” or “Got it in?”

If someone asked you where you bought something, you could say, I got it at Walmart. but what if instead of referring to a store you were referring to a city? Would you say, I got it at ...
5
votes
3answers
33k views

Correct preposition for “competence”

Which prepositions can be used with "competence"? Specificially, which of the following examples are valid/legal: I have competence on computers I have competence with computers I have competence as ...
17
votes
1answer
90k views

“Difference to” or “difference with” or “difference from”

When we use word difference to compare two things, we say for example, 'Difference between Intel and AMD'. However, how can I use word difference with only one thing, for example, what will be correct:...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Pencil you in on/for Sunday evening?

When planning an appointment for a specific day (and time), for example, should on or for preposition be used? See the context below, though, I am guessing, the rule should be universal: Sure, I ...
9
votes
1answer
26k views

“Article on” vs “article about”

Which one is correct: an excellent article on ant behaviour or an excellent article about ant behaviour? If both are correct, is there a difference in their meaning and usage?
1
vote
3answers
8k views

“Solution for” vs. “solution to” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Solution for” or “solution to” a problem? My problematic phrase is this: More and more patients from other states and countries sought here the ...
7
votes
3answers
94k views

Which is more appropriate — “I work for” or “I work at”?

If you are working as an employee at an organization, when you tell about it to others which usage would be more appropriate? I work for company. I work at company. Or are both usages ...
2
votes
1answer
364 views

Attributes of a TIME: Compared With/ Compared to

In the following question, should we be looking at comparison between two times in history or comparison between two attributes at different times? Intuitively, we compare between two people basing on ...
2
votes
1answer
7k views

Should I say “in my tests” or “on my tests”?

I want to say something like: Using APC is great advice. Performance increases a lot when you use it. (100 to 1 on my tests) Should I say "on my tests" or "in my tests"? Are any of those wrong? ...
7
votes
5answers
232k views

“Reschedule to” or “reschedule for”?

Would you like me to re-schedule to today instead? Would you like me to re-schedule for today instead?
1
vote
1answer
1k views

“Is it in slang?” versus “is it slang?”

What is more correct and why? I heard few British people speaking "in slang" and some of them said that unofficial language is named "slang." Additionally, is "slang" official/polite word?
4
votes
2answers
7k views

What does ‘peer around something’ mean?

Broadly speaking, peer seems to have two meanings, looking intently and being partially visible. a). She peered into the darkness. b). The moon peered from behind dark clouds. However, I ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Should I use “with” or “and”?

Jack gave Billy a glass of some drink and asked him to add couple of ice cubes to it. Billy took the glass and went to the kitchen. Moments later he came back with the same glass of drink and some ice ...
23
votes
4answers
141k views

“Approach to” or “approach for”

When do you use approach for, and when do you use approach to? (How can I answer questions like this? In which dictionaries should I look? How do I google it?) The reason to ask this question is an ...
0
votes
2answers
85k views

“Result in” or “result to”

I am trying to help a friend to write his CV. I don't know which preposition to use in the following paragraph: Advance Marketing Staff Knowledge & Skills Which Lead To Dramatically Increase In ...
3
votes
2answers
171 views

“With an (instrument)” and “by (instrument)”

"We forced the door with a jimmy" is idiomatic whereas "The door was forced by jimmy" (Note there is no article after 'by' in this sentence) is also idiomatic. However, "We forced the door by jimmy" ...
1
vote
3answers
17k views

Is it 'buy-in to', 'buy into', or 'buy in to' in the following sentence

"I don't understand why people <insert words here> products that have a reputation of hardware failures." What is the correct way to form this sentence?
11
votes
11answers
2k views

Are older senses of “anent” still alive in any dialect?

The obscure preposition anent has a long history, going back as far as Beowulf: him on efn ligeð ealdorgewinna [line 2903] ("beside him lies his great enemy") It has carried many meanings, ...
6
votes
5answers
30k views

“Late to the party” vs. “late for the party”

I've heard both versions, usually in similar contexts. Which one is correct or more correct — or more prevalent — in the USA? He: This deal ends at 7 p.m. She: Sucks, I am late to the party.
8
votes
2answers
1k views

US news articles missing out “on” when referring to a day

When watching US television news or reading US news articles there is this affectation where instead of saying: "Spotify music-streaming service to launch in U.S. on Thursday" (CNN) or "...
5
votes
4answers
17k views

“Thousands of thousands” vs. “Thousands upon thousands”

Is "thousands of thousands" grammatically correct? Why does it seem that "thousands upon thousands" sounds better, even though the former is closer to the logical truth? Is there any difference at all?...
7
votes
1answer
50k views

“Employment with” vs. “employment at”

Which of the following options are correct? [Some context] that is relevant to my employment with the company. [Some context] that is relevant to my employment at the company.
23
votes
7answers
206k views

“based in” vs “based out of ”

I have seen people use both forms below. Which is correct? If both are, in which situation is each better used? I am a software engineer based in New York. I am a software engineer based out of New ...
1
vote
4answers
11k views

“Referenced in” or “referenced from”?

Which of these sentences is more correct? ABC should not be referenced from file X. ABC should not be referenced in file X. ABC should not be referenced by file X.
22
votes
3answers
76k views

Why is 'to' not used before 'home'?

While learning English, I was taught not to put 'to' in front of 'home'. I.e. "go to home" is incorrect, you should say "go home". Is there a reason (maybe historical) for this?
16
votes
3answers
47k views

“Elaborate” as a transitive verb?

It is common to speak of "elaborating on (or upon) a topic." However, I have been told that this is appropriate only when some explanation has already been given; if no information is yet known, then ...
0
votes
2answers
188 views

Which is the correct construct? [closed]

Which one of the following is correct/better? As usual, I am more interested in the really good construct than just a comparison. The power of a programming language lies in abilities of the ...

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