Questions tagged [prepositions]

Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition. Questions need to include enough information for the intended meaning to be deduced.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Which preposition can be used in the sentence “The bird is flying in/above the sky.”? [closed]

I got confused what preposition exactly goes into the blank and why The bird is flying......the sky.(in/above)
1
vote
0answers
246 views

Is there a symbol for “from”?

I am wondering if there is a symbol or glyph to represent the preposition "from". I doubt there is a formal, de jure symbol (i.e., found in any manual of style or dictionary), but I cannot even find ...
1
vote
0answers
267 views

“Wishes of” or “wishes for”? [closed]

could someone tell me the difference between the two following sentences: my best wishes of a Merry Christmas OR my best wishes for a Merry Christmas I'm given to understand "Of a merry ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Pay for something in a period of time [closed]

I write an essay and need to use the phrase like: He will pay for a laptop in ten years (I suppose he borrowed money, but I don’t want to use “pay back”) Question: should we use “in” preposition?...
0
votes
1answer
713 views

When to use On/In/At?

When should I use On/In/At? I was In/At School? In/At Home? See you On/In/At Monday? I left the book In/At my parent's house? Other use cases I cn't think of right now? And why is there a ...
1
vote
0answers
50 views

Is it possible to say “to refund (an amount) to an order”?

I sent a Customer a partial refund. I want to inform her using the verb to refund + a preposition. Considering my native language, I would say I've just refunded $20 to your order. According to my ...
4
votes
2answers
304 views

Should the verb “impact” be always followed by “on”?

Nowadays, we often see the word impact being used as a verb. My question is, should it be always followed by the preposition on? Oxford Dictionaries gives the following example: The cuts will ...
-2
votes
1answer
24 views

voting master graduated

Ground or infinitive in present perfect continuous tense 📌I have been starting saving nature . 📌I have been starting to save nature. I don't know which one is correct.
3
votes
1answer
56 views

Meanings of prepositional phrases

He wants to kidnap the kids on the streets. I am writing to ask whether the sentence above is ambiguous? I've learned that prepositional phrases can function as adverb or adjective, which means "on ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

Stranding “of” in subjects - Possible or impossible?

Observation Take a subject that contains an of-phrase (friend of X, president of X, writer of X etc.). Now try to question the element X after of by fronting the corresponding wh-phrase. Often this ...
2
votes
1answer
365 views

What would be the correct preposition to use with “accident”?

What is the difference between in accident and on accident? Do we say, He lost his legs on accident or in accident?
1
vote
1answer
32 views

Opposite of “in front of”

I would like to modify the following sentence to change the location of the promoter to the opposite side. "TK promoter in front of the ICP27 gene in both vectors" Would it be as following?? "TK ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

How should an imperative sentence with multiple verb phrases and differing prepositions be worded?

The following are two version of a tagline. Ask questions and share your unique knowledge about trains with the hobbyist community. and Ask questions about and share your unique knowledge on ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

I need to know specific keyword who describes all room related services [closed]

Could anyone help me to find out specific keyword for all room related services like light facilities, water facilities, gas facilities and many more.
1
vote
1answer
152 views

What is the difference between “progress in” and “progress toward”?

Are these examples correct? I made progress in losing weight. I made progress toward a slimmer body.
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Question on preposition

Do you say 1) get some food to go from the Italian restaurant OR 2) get some food to go at the Italian restaurant or both are Okay?
1
vote
0answers
62 views

How to use phrasal verbs with prepositions without thinking which i have to use

I am frustrated about unawareness how to use up/down/with etc. with phrasal verbs properly.Being from Ukraine can't really understand if it means something or it is just a combination of words. So, my ...
0
votes
3answers
472 views

How to interpret Nancy Pelosi's statement?

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/reading-between-the-lines-of-trumps-oval-office-tussle/2018/12/11/7c7099f4-fda1-11e8-a17e-162b712e8fc2_story.html?utm_term=.809469483529 TRUMP: I also know ...
1
vote
1answer
53 views

“To arrive at school” and “at school to arrive”

I work at an ESL school and my students were taking an exam that asked them to unscramble words into a sentence. The result (as given by the answer key) was: Jessica was the last person to arrive ...
3
votes
2answers
238 views

Is there something wrong with this sentence?

I wrote in my English test: From 1960 both boys and girls have been allowed to study here. Is there something wrong with that sentence? Maybe I should have said: Since 1960 both boys and girls ...
3
votes
1answer
79 views

Prepositional verb structure - “[rely] [on John]” or “[rely on] [John]”

It is difficult to determine the correct consituent structure of prepositional verbs, such as rely on someone. Either on someone forms a constituent to the exclusion of rely, as in (1), or rely on ...
0
votes
1answer
210 views

The use of appropriate preposition [duplicate]

Which is the appropriate preposition of the word "Alternative "?
1
vote
2answers
4k views

“at this stage” Vs. “in this stage”

Going through a document for proof reading, I came across the phrase "In this stage, the model is put into operation" and was kind of confused. Mostly I had heard "At this stage ...", i.e. "at" ...
1
vote
0answers
37 views

How to find out needed prepositions with verbs [closed]

For example: I know some verb (not phrasal) and I wish to use it, but I don't know which preposition I need for it. Does it all depend on the noun, or verb, or something else ? Thank you for your ...
2
votes
1answer
390 views

looking back at or looking back on?

When remembering events from last year, would you say "looking back on 2017" or "looking back at 2017"?
1
vote
0answers
89 views

Never pre-positive adjectives and intransitive prepositions

The accepted response to an earlier question concerning words like alone, asleep and alive places such words in the category of adjectives that simply don't occur in front of the nouns or noun phrases ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Which is correct: “via/on/in/with a messenger”?

Which is correct: "via/on/in/with a messenger"? If more than one is correct, are there any shades of using different prepositions with "messenger"?
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Is the preposition “in” needed here? “Find the jury sheet in pertaining to…”

Find the jury sheet in pertaining to the sports event held at central sports club between 6:30 am and 8:00 am today. Find the jury sheet pertaining to the sports event held at central sports club ...
4
votes
3answers
116 views

Why do we say “ahead of” but not “behind of”?

It just occurred to me that even though "ahead/behind" mean opposite things, their usage is slightly different. Say we were talking about time zones. Why is it that I could say either I'm two hours ...
2
votes
2answers
260 views

“Half as likely as” or “Half as likely than”?

Which of the two following sentences is correct? "Group A is less than half as likely to succeed as Group B." "Group A is less than half as likely to succeed than Group B." I know that normally, a ...
0
votes
1answer
125 views

The process by which Middle English developed… or WAS developed?

From an answer on Quora: "...the phrasal verbs are usually Germanic, and Germanic words in English are more often colloquial, whereas Romance words are more often formal. The colloquial/formal ...
-1
votes
1answer
22 views

To qualify of or to qualify as degenerate

Which of those is correct? (1) We qualify those of degenerate. (2) We qualify those as degenerate.
1
vote
0answers
39 views

What is this gerund construction called?

In English the constructing for plus a corresponding gerund is often used, usually to identify a motivation for the main action (it seems to be more prevalent in colloquial speech); e.g.: I thank ...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

Stand out with or without “from”

On dictionary.cambridge.org the following two meanings are given for 'stand out': 1) to be very noticable 2) to be much better than other similar things or people For the 2nd meaning, the example ...
0
votes
1answer
81 views

'Fight + Object' Vs 'fight + preposition + object'

Often the verb fight is used without a preposition before its object, and sometimes with the preposition against! "...fought the invaders of his homeland". (M-W Dictionary) He fought the ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

Usage “For smth. to be ” in a sentence

Would the following sentence be grammatically correct: "For practical co-operation it is essential to have a uniform interpretation of the used terms and definitions." Thanks!
1
vote
1answer
23 views

Circular pattern - preposition before angle for two members only

I'm trying to describe that holes are placed in a circular pattern. When there are for example 6 holes in a circle I write: 6x hole every 60 deg. But how to describe when there are only two holes? "...
1
vote
1answer
916 views

Difference between “at this weekend” and “this weekend”

What's the difference between "at this weekend" and "this weekend" when they are used in a sentence. How do we use them correctly? For example, can I say " I am going to visit my friends at this ...
1
vote
1answer
467 views

Do you take his word against/over mine?

What preposition seems to fit in this sentence? What will the difference in the meaning of the sentence?
1
vote
0answers
599 views

“Paper is used for writing on ”or “paper is used for writing”,which one is grammatically correct?

"Paper is used for writing on "or "paper is used for writing",which one is grammatically correct ? Chopstics are used for eating . Chopstics are used for eaing with. This desk is used for putting ...
9
votes
1answer
346 views

Did prescriptivists make up pied-piping in relative infinitive constructions?

A quick Internet search suggests that pied-piping in relative clauses was a natural feature of English even though it is loved by prescriptivists; it existed in older stages of the language, and it ...
3
votes
1answer
172 views

“increase of” vs. “increase in” in connection with abstract quantities

I'm aware of two other questions with a similar title (here and here), but I'm not sure they answer my specific question. An editor of a journal has changed The observed increase of x ... to ...
1
vote
2answers
134 views

Can I say “until the dawn” instead of “until dawn”?

It would be something like "the baby was born at midnight, she cried until (the) dawn". I believe the more natural way of saying that would be without the "the", just "she cried until dawn", but I ...
1
vote
1answer
250 views

Approaches for OR Approaches of

The title of my thesis is "Approaches of PID controller design with applications and experimental validation" (It explains various techniques for the design of controllers for various systems) Is the ...
-1
votes
2answers
63 views

Doubt in some English/math grammar

I'm currently writing a math article in English, I'm wondering if i should writhe " replacing it on equation" or " replacing it in equation". Thank you guys very much.
0
votes
1answer
100 views

“to whom it may offend” vs. “to whom I may offend” [closed]

In my opening speech, is it right if I say I apologize to whom it may offend" or "I apologize to whom I may offend"
1
vote
0answers
290 views

Difference between “too long” and “for too long”

What is the difference between "too long" and "for too long" For example the ones below You can't stay under water for too long Or You can't stay under water too long Do not have that candy in ...
0
votes
2answers
101 views

At/from the outset

Consider the sentence: We've been friends at/from the outset. Which preposition is used?
1
vote
2answers
270 views

What does “of such” mean in this sentence?

My mother language is not English, so please give me a clear explanation of what does "of such" mean in this sentence? I could not find an equivalent in my language. The sentence is: encourage ...
1
vote
1answer
70 views

“Far from happy” Preposition followed by an adjective?

It occurs me that in such sentences as He is far from happy. However, just as the critics are not of one mind in their criticism, so they are far from united on what to do. the preposition ...