Questions tagged [prepositions]

Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition. Questions need to include enough information for the intended meaning to be deduced.

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what does “rotate within the plane of the surface” mean?

A rotates within the plane of the surface of the support. what does it mean? and one more question. "A and B move with respect to each other" in this sentence, A and B both move ? or when A moves B ...
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1answer
42 views

At/In highest quality?

I'm currently stuck on the right preposition followed by "highest quality" as in: "I make sure the posters are printable at/in their highest quality." Thanks!
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2answers
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Which preposition should follow facilitate?

Students should be facilitated to access on-line support. Students should be facilitated in accessing on-line support. Staff should facilitate students to access on-line support.
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1answer
47 views

Can 'of' be omitted in these sentences?

The basement was overflowed by the redolent aroma caused by various flowers growing out the ground. The basement was overflowed by the redolent aroma caused by various flowers growing out 'of'...
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1answer
43 views

Do we need to use from a list or in a list in this sentence - “Click on an asset from/in the Recently delivered assets list”

Scenario - There are many assets (computers, chairs, keyboards) displayed in a list (e.g. Recently delivered assets) in a software. I need to click on an asset (e.g. computer) that is listed in ...
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1answer
45 views

Should this have an “of” in it?

I am looking at this invitation letter and to me it seems like it is missing an "of" : You are invited to a wedding on SAT, SEPTEMBER 16TH, 2019 LORALEIGH and STEVEN I think it should ...
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0answers
20 views

Baby due date expected “on” or “in” [duplicate]

I am writing emails to relatives notifying that my wife is pregnant and we are expecting the birth on/in early August. Should I say: The due date is expected on August or The due date is ...
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2answers
169 views

Intersecting with the x-axis / intersecting the x-axis

Which is correct?: "The function intersects with the x-axis" or "The function intersects the x-axis" Is the verb 'to intersect' in the mathematical sense accompanied by the preposition 'with'?
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1answer
87 views

Why is the word 'is' not considered a preposition? [closed]

I am reading through the blue grammar book and the following is the definition of prepositions- A preposition is a word or set of words that indicates location (in, near, beside, on top of) or some ...
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1answer
67 views

Preposition “to” with places in present perfect

in BrE it is normal to say e.g.: "She's been to Africa twice." In the past simple, the preposition would be "in": "She was in Africa twice." Question 1: Why is there such a difference? Question 2:...
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2answers
73 views

Can / Should you begin *and* end a sentence with a preposition

Here's the phrase in question which originally ended with a preposition: Who is the client currently residing with? A way to rephrase to put the proposition at the beginning would be: ...
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1answer
53 views

Pronoun problems!

This question came up in an English second language test paper. A:Why didn't you tell me Brian broke the window? B:_____________________________________ The intended answer was - B: He begged me ...
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3answers
79 views

Usage of “in our house” vs “at our house”

Is the following sentence correct? We gathered in our grandparent's house can "in" be replaced with "at"? What if "house" is replaced with "home", does that make any difference?
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1answer
41 views

In the phrase, “The big shots up at the church”, is 'up at" a two word preposition?

I'm struggling with how to diagram 'up at'. Is this a two word or complex preposition or something else?
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1answer
27 views

When talking about a year in the past, do you use by, in or before?

There has been a few questions on this but this one example has never really been answered. If you were writing a report on the year before and you wanted to say that the a project was completed in ...
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0answers
91 views

“Contributions by” or “from”?

The yearbook is made with love by Lisa, with contributions by Mary and Sal. or The yearbook is made with love by Lisa, with contributions from Mary and Sal.
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4answers
122 views

Why do we say “in range” but “out of range”?

Is is the pair of expressions "in range" and "out of range" just an idiomatic outlier? Maybe not, as you can put something "in the list" or take it "out of the list". But I can think of other in/out ...
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1answer
47 views

“in Figure 1 to Figure 3” or “in from Figure 1 to Figure 3”

I have 3 figures to demonstrate some process. Which one should be used? The process is shown in Figure 1 to Figure 3. or The process is shown in from Figure 1 to Figure 3. I feel that the ...
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0answers
65 views

Escaping [one place] to [another] - sentence structure validity

I want to use the following phrase in this specific structure (if possible): How come social media is considered as a way for people to escape life when they sometimes escape social media to(?) ...
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3answers
53 views

Usage of “in” before were in a sentence from Shoe Dog

Why is 'in' used before was/were in this sentence from the book Shoe Dog by Phil Knight? Some Tuesday nights in the Reserves were set aside for classroom time. It seems like a mistake. Would ...
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1answer
65 views

Which preposition to use after “careless?”

Is there a difference in meaning or usage between careless with/about/of? I found dictionary examples of all three, but I failed to grasp the difference (if there is any): He was careless of ...
3
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2answers
119 views

Why do we use “in” in the phrase “in front of”?

I just realized I can't quite make out why we use the word "in." The meaning of front is generally a surface, a side - not a space you can be "in," so how did that happen? Is it an artifact of an ...
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2answers
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“Class, open your books TO/AT page 13!”—Is it a matter of dialectal difference?

My original notion was, A) If there's a movement and a destination (as in the case of thumbing a book to reach a certain page), it should be to: Class, open your books to page 13! B) If there's ...
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2answers
45 views

What is the correct preposition after “rights”?

This question came up for me within the context of intellectual property rights in a film grant competition. When “right” is singular, the correct preposition is “to,” such as in the right to free ...
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1answer
33 views

Should I use in or within in the following sentence?

In the following sentence, which preposition should I use and why? “I was included within the Employer’s Agent team.” OR ”I was included in the Employer’s Agent team.” I would greatly appreciate ...
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1answer
73 views

to ban sth from/in/at?

I want to talk about the banning of plastic at/in/from schools. I just wondered which preposition is the best or the right one? The sentence is: Teachers are in favor of banning plastic at/from/...
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1answer
45 views

Usual combinations of nouns/verbs and prepositions

Following Macmillan Dictionary, we can find out that word list can be used together with the preposition of (example sentence: A list of the world’s richest people). We are looking for a collection ...
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1answer
65 views

Tunnel Into/Through

“Locals chiseled the Guoliang Tunnel into — and through —the side of a mountain.” From https://www.thisisinsider.com/guoliang-tunnel-built-into-mountain-2015-12 What is the difference between “into”...
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1answer
30 views

'Sufferer of ' vs 'sufferer from'

If one suffers from a disease, is one better considered a sufferer from a disease, or a sufferer of a disease?
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1answer
156 views

Preposition “of” or “to”: “a challenge of/to modern Europe”

I am wondering which one is correct: "Secessionism as a challenge of modern Europe" "Secessionism as a challenge to modern Europe" Thank you! :)
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2answers
231 views

“provide X to someone” vs “provide X for someone”

I am confused by the different explanations in the following two dictionaries. Macmillan says “provide A to B”, while The Free Dictionary says it is wrong and tells us not to say “provide A to B”, ...
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1answer
97 views

From <date> to <date> OR On <date> to <date>?

I have a question about using the prepositions indicating starting and ending dates. Which of the following is grammatically correct and why? I will be away from March 1st to 5th. I will be away on ...
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1answer
60 views

Preposition stranding: is it possible to remove preposition altogether?

Here is one phrase: This mayhem is not something to put up with. Here "put up with" is a complete expression, so I cannot simply drop "with" or "up" from the end. How about this one, a title for ...
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1answer
246 views

Is the usage of “with which” here correct?

"Where is the key with which I usually use to unlock the drawer in the office?" Is the sentence above grammatically correct? I saw it in a test a few days ago...
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1answer
58 views

“Which planet is nearest Earth?” vs “Which planet is the nearest to Earth?”

I don't understand why the definite article is not used in front of the superlative and why we don't use the preposition "to" as in: Which planet is the nearest to Earth? instead of ...
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3answers
66 views

Is there a difference in meaning between “I'll be there for 7pm” and “I'll be there at 7pm”?

I feel like "for 7pm" is possibly colloquial and perhaps not quite Standard English, but I have heard it a lot. I can't think if there's any difference in meaning between "I'll be there for 7" and "I'...
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0answers
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Choice of preposition in “best-of-x” in sports and other competitions

I would like to understand the logic (if there is any) behind the phrase "best-of-x" (where x is a number) in the context of competitions, most notably sports. I understand that best-of-five implies ...
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1answer
31 views

First song I ever recorded (was to/to was) a Fat Joe beat

I watched an interview and he said "First song I ever recorded was to a Fat Joe beat." I wonder, can I switch the positions of "was" and "to" like this? "First song I ever recorded to was a ...
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3answers
87 views

Is it ever correct to use “on” after “continue”?

Is it ever grammatically correct to use the word "on" after the word "continue"? as in: "After this break, we will continue on with the broadcast."
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2answers
53 views

Articles and Prepositions: “At/The mountain of…” and “…descended in/on her head” [closed]

The/A mountain of family responsibilities had already descended in/on her head. According to me, it is in her head. But I am not 100% sure about the answer because in the net various answers are ...
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1answer
18 views

Confusion in usage of In / within

●In the given sentence which one is more appropriate out of in and within " The voice in / within you " ●If suppose i replace ' you' with 'me' which preposition out of in,within will be the most ...
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3answers
47 views

Can you always replace “that that” with “which that”?

At least I haven't yet been able to imagine a context in which there is a clear semantic difference between "that that" and "which that". No hardware warnings, either. I've always been a bit troubled ...
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0answers
33 views

“breaking the window” or “breaking of the window”

I've come across this: He insisted that he had nothing to do with breaking the window. Is it correct? Shouldn't use the preposition "of" between "breaking" and "the window"?
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1answer
41 views

On vs In In the given sentence [closed]

Which one of the following is correct? On the pulpit/In the pulpit. I Hope it is on the pulpit.
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1answer
75 views

Using “from” instead of “since” when referring to a date

Is it appropriate to use "from" instead of "since" in reference to a specific date? Also, does it matter whether this date is in the past or future when considering the previous question? For example,...
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2answers
61 views

“Sit at the beach” [closed]

I have a question about the use of "at the beach". I know there were similar topics, however in none of them I can find whether it is possible to say "sit at the beach". More specifically I want to ...
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1answer
24 views

preposition follow the word “interpreter”?

Example Statement: He acted as interpreter between the Spanish locals and the tourists. Should the preposition following "interpreter" be "between" or "for" or something else? or should the entire ...
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0answers
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Function of PPs with predicative complements

According to CaGEL* (e.g. p.636 ff), prepositions can take predicative complements, as in [1] She worked as a waitress [2] He passed for dead [3] I took you for granted [4] They left him for ...
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2answers
319 views

“resulted in” vs “resulted on”

Consider the sentence The attack resulted in Robert breaking his ankle. Is resulted in correct here? What about resulted on, would it be correct here or in any other sentence? what other word can ...
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0answers
199 views

“Apply for” vs. “apply to”, a different case

The method A is applied for the determination of B. or The method A is applied to the determination of B. I often see these phrases in scientific texts. But which one is correct? There is ...