Questions tagged [prepositions]

Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition. Questions need to include enough information for the intended meaning to be deduced.

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3 votes
2 answers
95 views

forbidden from or forbidden to

In this sentence: We are forbidden a) to smoke in the classroom or b) from smoking in the classroom. Which sounds better? I know that these two options are correct, however I’m thinking which one is ...
-2 votes
0 answers
21 views

What is the name of the words that are not syncategorematic, but not important to mark them as tags/keywords of the content? [closed]

(I don't know english grammer or linguistics) I'm trying to create a searching tool, which automatically generates tags for a content. I'm trying to make the software not mark useless words as tags. ...
0 votes
2 answers
45 views

Fluctuation in vs of

What is the difference between "fluctuation in" and "fluctuation of"? For instance, There is no fluctuation of the singularity location. and There is no fluctuation in the ...
0 votes
2 answers
52 views

The meaning of "get away with a light sentence" [closed]

I have a question with the meaning of "get away with a light sentence". Does "get away with a light sentence" mean that "the person escaped a light sentence" or mean that ...
0 votes
1 answer
62 views

Difference between noun+to do+preposition VS noun+for doing (+preposition)

Through English grammar books, I understand that a proper preposition is always necessary when the verb in a to-infinitive before a noun is an intransitive verb, such as: There is no place to play in....
4 votes
2 answers
37k views

"Key to" vs. "key for"

Key to exercises. Today I saw the quoted sentence when looking at the keys to exercises, and afterwards that sentence got me thinking why the preposition to is used here instead of for. The way ...
0 votes
0 answers
17 views

the correct way of using prepositions [closed]

What's the most correct way to say: "A mistake from a client" "A mistake of a client" "A client's mistake" ?
0 votes
3 answers
55 views

Use of the preposition "of" after "modelling"

Consider two sentences: Modelling of the dynamo proved to be resource-consuming. See an account of the latest developments in modelling of the dynamo elsewhere. Do I use "of" after "...
7 votes
1 answer
162k views

"At the moment" or "in the moment"?

I'd always thought "at the moment" was the only correct one, but then I saw "in the moment". There's a composer talking about his work life and he says: "I totally believe in ...
4 votes
1 answer
240 views

What does one call the noun a preposition relates to its object?

With minimal research online one can easily find that a prepositional phrase consists of a preposition and an object. Most online and paper resources will describe a preposition as a word that ...
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

What is the difference between two cases of "impact", with and without "on/upon"?

I see Oxford Learner's Dictionary offers two examples for entry of "Impact". The meaning is "to have an effect on somebody/something". One example is with proposition of "on/...
-1 votes
0 answers
24 views

Appropriate Preposition ;phrasal verb [closed]

The car pulled across the driveway. Can I use across in this context?
2 votes
1 answer
49 views

In what cases is best to use "to" or "for" after the words "stimulus" and "impetus"?

In what cases is best to use "to" or "for" after the words "stimulus" and "impetus"? Is there any difference in the use of the prepositions with each of the ...
0 votes
3 answers
146 views

Across (covering all area/part of)

Example sentence: Harry moved his head over on the pillow. In the bed to his right lay Hermione. Moonlight was falling across her bed. My research: According to various dictionaries, the definition ...
3 votes
1 answer
12k views

"Report by" or "report from"

Which is better? A new report by (Company name) was released today. A new report from (Company name) was released today.
4 votes
1 answer
154 views

What's the difference in usage between "to" and "unto" in 17th century English?

I am writing a script in which all the characters speak early Modern English. I have learned a bit about Old English, but I am not an expert so I am also consulting multiple artificial intelligences, ...
5 votes
2 answers
426 views

Term for Foreign Speakers of a language using the prepositions etc. of their mother tongue

One of the things I notice when conversing with people who have largely achieved full conversational English, is that they have the correct noun, verb and adjective vocabulary, but they frequently (...
0 votes
1 answer
82 views

During vs. Throughout

Physics vocabulary - Which one is the most natural? (a) During the approximation process (b) Throughout the approximation process (c) During the approximation procedure (d) Throughout the ...
76 votes
14 answers
237k views

"Based on" instead of "based off of"

I sometimes see cases where off is followed by of, and it sounds awkward to me. For example, I would prefer This story is based on a true story. to This story is based off of a true story. ...
1 vote
0 answers
21 views

Use of 'of' and 'none' in the following sentence [migrated]

Cows are amongst the gentlest of animals; none shows more passionate tenderness towards their young. In this sentence, why there is 'of' after 'the gentlest' and the use of none is also confused me. ...
2 votes
6 answers
30k views

"In" vs. "of" after the superlative form of adjectives

Hanna's the youngest member of the team. Why isn't it "in the team"? The rule that we covered in out textbook New Total English pre-intermediate says that we use in with groups of people and ...
1 vote
2 answers
1k views

Is there any difference between "it's dead to me" and "it's dead for me?"

I read iTunes Is Dead to Me and was curious if there is any difference between saying "iTunes is dead to me" and "iTunes is dead for me?"
11 votes
4 answers
30k views

"End with" vs. "end in"

I'm writing up some documentation, and I'm unsure which phrase to use: Option X: Find all strings ending with foo. or Option X: Find all strings ending in foo. Are both correct? (Google spits ...
11 votes
5 answers
5k views

Difference between "under", "underneath", "below" and "beneath"

It leads me to the confusion, when it comes to contradicting between some prepositions. Today, I want to know the distinction between the two similar senses of these prepositions: under, underneath, ...
0 votes
1 answer
60 views

Are prepositions relative to one another?

Take an instance with some of the most common English prepositions: in, on, at, below, and above. The noun "aircraft" goes with "on", but is the sentence "Parachuters jump ...
0 votes
0 answers
249 views

Which is better: "On first reading" vs. "At first reading"?

In the context of a section in a technical document that describes several topics, one of which is essential and others can be skipped, which of the following is better? You can skip the others on ...
1 vote
1 answer
59 views

Can you omit the propositions "to", "as I", "as we" or "in order to" before a verb?

Here in Ghana, I've noticed a growing trend of people using phrases like: "Come, join us celebrate the goodness of God." or "This is to enable GRIDco undertake the stringing of ...
1 vote
0 answers
23 views

The usage of 'of' to specify an amount and value [closed]

As a non-native speaker of English, I think we use the "of" term in an interesting way when we define the amount of something. I know that "The rock has a mass of 50 kg" is a ...
4 votes
3 answers
5k views

Is it ever correct to use "on" after "continue"?

Is it ever grammatically correct to use the word "on" after the word "continue"? as in: "After this break, we will continue on with the broadcast."
-1 votes
1 answer
124 views

Minus vs less (in math)

We used to talk about subtractions employing the word minus as a preposition like "10 minus 5 is 5... "what is 5 minus 3?" .... Is it OK to replace the word minus by "less" ...
0 votes
1 answer
72 views

Is it grammatical to omit "it was" after "for" after a proper noun?

Given the following sentence: "Will, so-called for it was short for William, drank his tea." Is it grammatical to omit 'it was' so that the sentence becomes: "Will, so-called for ...
-1 votes
1 answer
32 views

Extend by/for - Correct Usage [closed]

Do the below sentences convey the same meaning? If this petition is approved, you can extend your legal status by (additional/up to) 2 years. If this petition is approved, you can extend your legal ...
0 votes
0 answers
34 views

What is the difference between "in" and "at" in "Take Spanish at/in school!"? [duplicate]

What is the difference between the two statements "You wanna be cool? Take Spanish at school!" and "You wanna be cool? Take Spanish in school!"
5 votes
3 answers
1k views

What is this usage - "to stay home of an evening"? [duplicate]

I've been reading a selection of short stories by Kafka (translation by Michael Hoffmann). In one of stories The Sudden Walk, I encountered this phrase When it seems we have finally decided to stay ...
2 votes
2 answers
21k views

"Cater to" vs. "cater for"

Is there any difference between "cater to" and "cater for"? Which is better in this context: The dramatist must cater to the taste of the audience. The dramatist must cater for the taste of the ...
1 vote
1 answer
35 views

Adjective clause introduced by a relative pronoun "which" VS Preposition "including"

By now, the extradition bill that had sparked the protests had been withdrawn, but the movement had come up with a list of demands, which included amnesty for arrested protesters, an independent ...
2 votes
2 answers
91 views

'Win $100 IN art' vs 'Win $100 OF art'

I'm writing some ad copy and we have a healthy disagreement about which of the following we should use: Win $100 in art Win $100 of art Which one is correct, clearer, or more established? The ...
6 votes
4 answers
1k views

What is the difference between “To every action” and “For every action”?

Here are two statements: The first statement is: To every action there is always an equal and opposite reaction. The second statement is: For every action there is always an equal and opposite ...
1 vote
3 answers
471 views

At/from the outset

Consider the sentence: We've been friends at/from the outset. Which preposition is used?
7 votes
7 answers
29k views

Origin of the phrase "That's mighty white of you..."

What is the origin of the phrase "that's mighty white of you, brother"? Is it simply a racist statement, as it appears to be, or does it have another, older or obscure derivation? I've ...
6 votes
4 answers
417 views

Does "have experience..." take a preposition?

I often struggle with whether "experience + noun/gerund" should include a preposition — and no matter how much digging I do in style manuals, dictionaries, and web search results, I never ...
6 votes
3 answers
8k views

If and Whether - or not? Interrogative and Conditional words

It's clear to me that in some situations, "if" works but "whether" does not: 1a) If it rains, I shall take my umbrella. 1b) Call me if rain is predicted. Also some where only "whether or not" will ...
1 vote
1 answer
46 views

Do I use by, for or to in this sentence?

The sentence is I shared the resource link with my colleagues so that this link would be accessible for all members of our team. The word I am asking about is highlighted. Should it be by, for or to?...
17 votes
2 answers
121k views

"apply to" vs. "apply for" an opportunity

I am trying to complete the following sentence: " . . . where certification qualifies students to apply [prep.] a wider range of employment and higher learning opportunities." I have noted the ...
0 votes
0 answers
51 views

"feeling nostalgic {for/of/about} summer sunsets”?

Which preposition is needed in the gap; is it for, of or about? I am feeling nostalgic _____ summer sunsets. Merriam-Webster and aging hippies nostalgic for their youth. Cambridge Dictionary She ...
0 votes
1 answer
35 views

Preposition on, in & against, on

Which of these statements is correct? On/In a. Lying in the bed or b. Lying on the bed Against/On a. Leaning against the wall or b. Leaning on the wall
7 votes
5 answers
2k views

"On" and "Off" for Lights, Electrical Switches, etc

Simple question: Why were the prepositions "on" and "off" used for things like "The lights are on" and "The computer is off", and when did these words gain their new usage? I'm guessing back in the ...
0 votes
3 answers
879 views

Correct usage of preposition "of" with month and year only

I've been researching like crazy a definitive source for determining whether I can correctly and properly use the preposition "of" to write the month and year only. I located one source, the ...
-1 votes
1 answer
69 views

Which preposition is correct to use in "to conjugate __ 3rd Person Singular"?

Is it at/on/in with the following phrase: to conjugate .... 3rd Person Singular So far I consistently use "at". Am I right? Edit: "have" is conjugated ... the 3rd Person Singular,...
0 votes
0 answers
116 views

Difference between "Intrigued With" and "Intrigued By"

What exactly is the difference between the usage of "intrigued with" and "intrigued by" in sentences?

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