Questions tagged [prepositional-objects]

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Which verb is to be used? [duplicate]

In this sentence from an exercise in a book I read, we are asked to select the right verb: She is one of those gifted writers who (turn / turns) out one best seller after another. I thought the ...
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1answer
44 views

Where should an adverb be positioned when converting from active to passive? [closed]

Please consider this example sentence: Karen spoke rudely to the manager. Should the corresponding sentence rearranged into the passive be: The manager was spoken rudely to by Karen. The manager ...
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32 views

“Instead of ʏᴏᴜʀ calling” vs “Instead of ʏᴏᴜ calling” [duplicate]

Which is better: Instead of your calling, maybe I should do it. Instead of you calling, maybe I should do it. I feel like the first one is the better choice here because instead of needs a gerund, ...
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2answers
275 views

How is “Scope of Work” pluralized: “Scopes of Work” or “Scope of Works”?

If a title of a thing has a prepositional phrase in it, does the plural form pluralize the subject or the object of the preposition, i.e. 'Scope of Work', is the plural form 'Scopes of Work', or '...
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1answer
46 views

ambiguous object of prepositional phrase?

What is the object of the prepositional phrase along with... in this sentence, I was in the first wave of implementation, along with eighteen million other vampires, witches, ghouls, werewolves, feral ...
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2answers
100 views

When i quote you from him you do not listen but when i quote you from Einstein you listen [closed]

Feeling great to join this network. I appreciate it. I have a question: is it better to use the word quote or cite in such situation talking with a hypocrite person? "When I quote you from him ...
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1answer
41 views

How can I use prepositions differently not normally?

I have seen some complex sentences, having complex grammar of prepositions. For example: “T is the temperature to which the accumulated distillate stream, formed in previous effects, cools down to ...
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2answers
166 views

Why is 'immune' used with 'to'?

A recent news item reported : ... they are also concerned about his argument in a 2009 legal article that a sitting president should be immune to prosecution. The OED states that the adjective '...
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1answer
42 views

Meaning and usage of ‘other than’? [closed]

I have questions about 'other than'... She couldn’t do anything about her bad luck other than suffer through it. 1) What’s the exact meaning and usage of 'other than' in this sentence? 2) Isn’t ...
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1answer
515 views

Is the phrase “the ease at which / the ease by which …” correct

1) ** Is it correct to follow "ease" with "at which" such as in "The **ease at which you can carry this bag depends on the angle you hold it from" 2) Does anyone have a good source recommendation ...
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1answer
187 views

Use of the preposition “by” along with “which” [duplicate]

There is a difference in the difficulty by which the two different objects can be lifted up. Is "by" correct here? Does "difficulty by which" sound natural? is there maybe a better alternative? ...
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1answer
224 views

Is it grammatically correct to place the object of preposition before the preposition? [duplicate]

In conversation, it's normal to say: What time do you have to be at the train station by? Note: What time do you have to be at the train station vs What time do you have to be at the train station ...
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117 views

Prepositional introductory phrase: “With John, we discussed …”

Is the following phrasing proper and accepted English? With John, we discussed ... Instead of saying "John and I discussed ..." or "John and the team discussed", etc. It seems to me that the ...
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1answer
100 views

How can I phrase this sentence so that it doesn't end in a preposition?

Whenever possible, I like to avoid ending sentences with prepositions because some people can be very picky about it. However, I am struggling with this one sentence in particular: "The hypothesis ...
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300 views

Preposition + relative clause - “This is the house about which I told you.”

This is the house about which I told you. In the above sentence, the relative pronoun "which" is considered to be the prepositional complement of the preposition "about". 1.) If the relative pronoun ...
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2answers
2k views

Is the second “on” necessary in this sentence?

“It still makes economic sense” to put on as much weight on as efficiently as you can, to minimize losses” feedlot owner Tom Fanning told Bloomberg. https://www.voanews.com/a/mht-good-news-for-burger-...
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2answers
538 views

How to use apostrophe with plural object of preposition [duplicate]

Which apostrophe is correct? (There are multiple dogs.) One of the dogs' tails One of the dog's tails I believe it is the former but I'm not 100% certain. I found absolutely no guidance on ...
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1answer
187 views

A question about sentence-structure and relative clause

Here is the sentence. According to economic signaling theory, consumers may perceive the frequency with which an unfamiliar brand is advertised as a cue that the brand is of high quality. I have ...
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2answers
8k views

“On a Desert” or “In a Desert” and Common Usage

I was reading to my daughter the other night and came across an awkward passage in Crockett Johnson's "Harold's Trip to the Sky": "There was nothing to see. He was in the middle of a desert. No ...
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1answer
127 views

Which preposition should follow “sympathies”

I want to ask an organization: Does your organization have any sympathies __ [such and such ideology (X)]. Which preposition should follow "sympathies?" I was thinking "to" might work, as if ...
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3answers
129 views

What is the sense of “bosom labouring” here? [closed]

I've just came a cross the following sentence: It seemed to breathe from a bosom labouring under the deadliest terror. and can't puzzle out the meaning of this two words combined together in this ...
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1answer
102 views

Correct grammar / style for segments that share the same (lengthy) prepositional object

I'm having trouble with a sentence that uses two (or more) prepositional phrases, which share the same prepositional object. For example, I would like to turn these two statements: A main theme in ...
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1answer
255 views

the door to his room

I always think for ownership or assignment we should use an "of" word. For example, I think this phrase is correct: The door of his room but, I read a story book of Longman and I saw this phrase: The ...
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2answers
648 views

Wh-clause after a preposition

I've sometimes come across the expression 'speak for', not a phrasal as such, but an expression to say 'is a clear sign of' as in The regular attendance at the course speaks for its great success. ...
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1answer
9k views

To interact to/with each other [closed]

I want to describe how objects interact [to or with] each other. Which preposition should I use here to show how these objects interact?
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2answers
62 views

Do I need a “with” in the following sentence?

Usually, I know the answer. But the following sentence confuses me: Was he the man she had shared her flesh and feelings (with) for four years? Is the with necessary? Why or why not?
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2answers
2k views

He, together with she and I? [duplicate]

How do you write the following sentence: Marcelo, together with Angela and I, are going to... Marcelo, together with Angela and myself, are going to...
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1answer
2k views

Prepositions with the verb “ask”: “ask questions from,” “ask a question to”

"What questions do they ask a communication trainer?" or "What questions do they ask from a communication trainer?" Also, I know "She asked me a question" is what's generally used but just have a ...
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5answers
8k views

On/At/In someone's suggestion?

What, and why, is the right choice in these cases? (*) my supervisor's suggestion, I changed my schedule. Should (*) be: in, on, at, under,....?
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4answers
1k views

Can I substitute 'to' for 'for' here in order to not repeat 'for' twice [closed]

I'm trying to rewrite this sentence, can someone suggest a grammatically correct (and better) sentence: I was not prepared for his calm enthusiasm for my question. I'm thinking something like: ...
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1answer
13k views

In or On Microsoft Excel's Table/Cells/Column

I have a rather odd question here. I am delivering a presentation to a wide audience of Excel users. How do you go about using prepositions when it comes down to Microsoft Excel's Worksheet, ...
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4answers
724 views

Omission of “being” after prepositions

I've heard from somewhere in this website that being can be deleted after almost every preposition... which aroused many questions as to the usage of being for me. Today, I encountered this sentence: ...
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1answer
385 views

as little as 1 day as an adjective object phrase of a preposition

You can get your money back in as little as 1 day! It is a sentence I heard from an advertisement. Sadly, I cannot tell if this is what the advertisement said, for I did not pay much attention to ...
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1answer
162 views

Does speed limit become plural when referencing two roads?

When writing about the speed limit on two different roads, is it correct to say: "The speed limits on Hunt Brothers Road and State Road 17 will both be reduced to 45 miles per hour," or "The speed ...
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1answer
531 views

A “lesson 'in' compassion”, but a “moral ___ compassion”?

We say "a lesson 'in' something". What is the acceptable preposition to be used with "moral" as a synonymous noun with "message" or "lesson"? The most common collocation is "the moral 'of' the story,...
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1answer
3k views

send something to someone or somewhere

Background: I am writing a computer application which can understand English sentence. For that purpose, I was preparing frames of each word. For example: send something to recipient|place Since ...
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1answer
199 views

To whoever wills … Vs. To whomever wills [duplicate]

So, is it "whoever" because it is the subject of the predicate "wills", or is it "whomever" because it is the object of the preposition "to"?
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2answers
372 views

How do I differentiate between direct and indirect object with an object of a preposition present?

I am working on the following sentence: They will look toward me, whom they pierced. I am aware that a basic rule to identifying an indirect object is to ask, "to whom?" However, in this case, I am ...
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1answer
1k views

“…four others, one of whom responded.” Is “whom” correct here? Can I use “who” instead?

I want to shorten this: I sent emails to four others. One person responded. Does the following sentence correctly use whom to achieve my goal? I sent emails to four others, one of whom ...
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3answers
3k views

Part of speech of “brief” and “short” in the phrases “in brief” and “in short”

The phrases "in brief" and "in short" function as adverbs, but as what part of speech do "brief" and "short" function in these phrases? "Brief" stands alone as both a noun and adjective and could be ...
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0answers
67 views

in a computer vs on a computer [duplicate]

Important information can be stored in a computer vs Important information can be stored on a computer Also, can we use stored and saved alternatively/interchangebaly with computer. E.g. ...
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2answers
548 views

Can one talk “with” someone?

The verb talk usually has to preceding its complement/object: (I) I talked to him about his misbehavior. Is it idiomatic (and/or grammatical) to use with instead? (II) I talked with him about ...
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1answer
597 views

Uncommon uses of the preposition 'with'

It strikes me that the way we use 'with' is more complex than we may think. So I have two questions: Can the preposition 'with' be used to mean 'about' or 'in relation to'? (sentence a and b). And ...
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1answer
6k views

Why “all of us” instead of “all of we”? [closed]

When using the construction "all of us" as a subject in a sentence, the pronoun stays an object pronoun, as such: All of us are in the same boat. The alternate construction just sounds weird (to ...
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2answers
808 views

Omitting definite articles in prepositional phrases with specific objects

Hyphenated adjectives aside, is omitting the "the" in "on scene," "in studio," "on set" etc. any more or less correct than including it? My inquiry stems primarily from curiosity about the use of "...
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3answers
24k views

Why is the sentence “ I am going to home” incorrect?

I often hear people say I will do it when I reach to home While it does not make sense and I urge the people correct themselves, I often fail to give them the logic. What suggestions may you ...
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1answer
897 views

Me, myself, or I?

a) I am surprised that someone other than I had a cat named Hamlet. or b) I am surprised that someone other than myself had a cat named Hamlet. or c) I am surprised that someone other than ...
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3answers
700 views

Similarities and differences: 'in + VERBing' vs 'VERBing' alone

Source: p 145, Frederick Schauer’s Thinking Like a Lawyer In being an empirical response to an empirical claim, this explanation engages Realism on its own terms, and so little can be said ...
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4answers
290 views

Is it still an indirect object if you're taking something away?

So Jim is the indirect object in the sentence "Sally gave Jim a sandwich." But is Jim still the indirect object if the sentence is "Sally took the sandwich from Jim"? And if the sentence were to ...