Questions tagged [prepositional-objects]

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In “He is easy to take care of,” is “He” the subject, the object, or both?

This is a passive construction, correct? I feel the missing piece of the puzzle is “He is easy to take care of (by or for babysitters/parents/etc.)” My brain is doing a bit of a loop because ...
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How do you figure out the prepositional object with a clause final preposition? [closed]

First time asking a question, sorry for any weirdness. The best way for me to illustrate might be with some examples. I believe all 4 of the following are both grammatical and would be commonly used ...
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45 views

River city - a city with a river running through it? [closed]

On Wikipedia there is a page called River city and there is a list of cities located on a river: Australia: Brisbane, Queensland China: Jilin City Wuhan New Zealand: Whanganui United States: ...
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"introduce to" takes an indirect object?

Quirk's A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language (p.1209) lists "introduce to" among ditransitive verbs that take an indirect object and a prepositional object (the latter serving as ...
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Why is "the" optional in "at home", "at school", or "at church"? [duplicate]

I was talking to my Spanish friend and found out it's ok to say "en casa" (at home) without needing the article "la (casa)". Then it dawned on me that in English, it's also the ...
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"Within me" or "within myself"

I always hesitate between within me or within myself when the subject is I. Is there a rule that can help me decide? For example, in this sentence The fullness of life that we receive within us/...
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2 votes
2 answers
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Do I assign something to me or do I assign it to myself? (Me/Myself) in prepositional phrase?

In chatting with a coworker, I asked "Should I assign [the task] to myself" but then I got discombobulated and wondered if it should have been "to me" instead. I searched for an ...
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Problems in something vs Problems with something? [closed]

May I know what is the difference between problems in doing something and problems with doing something?
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131 views

...understood by/through studying its

There are several questions regarding the distinction between by and through, but still, I cannot seem to decide which of these prepositions suits better in the context below. What do you think? X ...
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Gerund after "to". Sentence: We use music to helping us relax

I found this question in a test: "We use music to helping us relax." Where helping was the correct answer option. I want to know why is this form of the verb correct and not the infinitive ...
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-1 votes
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Maybe because the salt content in Yippee is a little less

Maybe because the salt content in Yippee is a little less. Maybe because the salt content is a little less in Yippee. Which one of these two is grammatically correct? Can you throw some light on this ...
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Using 'for' or 'to'

The collaborative nature of the program offers customized solutions for customers and channel partners. or The collaborative nature of the program offers customized solutions to customers and ...
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Can prepositions and verbs have an indirect object(s) or is the object of a verb(s) or preposition(s) always direct? [closed]

This is something I have always wondered, but I have been struggling with the subject-object thing for too long a time now, I can still very much in English learner.
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When the adjective 'suited' is followed by a verb, should this verb be in the infinitive or in the -ing form?

Here are some example sentences from different dictionaries. With her qualifications and experience, she would seem to be ideally suited to/for the job. (Cambridge online dictionary) This was a job ...
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In order of appearance "in" or "on" the chain

I want to say array that stores positions of nucleotides in order of appearance in (or is it on?) the S chain. I know it sounds too specific as a genetics kind of question, but is just for a ...
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Adverb of place vs prepositions

Keep the book right on the table. Keep the food down on the floor. Are the words right and down working as adverbs or prepositions here? If they're adverbs, what do they modify? If they're ...
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"go to" vs "go for" vs "go on"

What's the difference between "go to", "go for" and "go on"? When can we use each of them? For example: books.google.ru: 1. At the age of ten my teacher suggested I should go for an audition at ...
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Function of object of preposition [duplicate]

Consider the sentence "What is the probability of Bob winning?" What is the function of "Bob winning"? It's certainly acting as the object of the preposition, but I don't recognize this type of ...
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1 vote
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The gerund and its complementation

In what cases does the gerund stemming from a transitive verb take the direct object of that verb and when is a prepositional complement used? For example: Brown's deft painting of his daughter is ...
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Where should an adverb be positioned when converting from active to passive? [closed]

Please consider this example sentence: Karen spoke rudely to the manager. Should the corresponding sentence rearranged into the passive be: The manager was spoken rudely to by Karen. The manager ...
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“Instead of ʏᴏᴜʀ calling” vs “Instead of ʏᴏᴜ calling” [duplicate]

Which is better: Instead of your calling, maybe I should do it. Instead of you calling, maybe I should do it. I feel like the first one is the better choice here because instead of needs a gerund, ...
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2 answers
5k views

How is "Scope of Work" pluralized: "Scopes of Work" or "Scope of Works"?

If a title of a thing has a prepositional phrase in it, does the plural form pluralize the subject or the object of the preposition, i.e. 'Scope of Work', is the plural form 'Scopes of Work', or '...
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1 answer
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ambiguous object of prepositional phrase?

What is the object of the prepositional phrase along with... in this sentence, I was in the first wave of implementation, along with eighteen million other vampires, witches, ghouls, werewolves, feral ...
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When i quote you from him you do not listen but when i quote you from Einstein you listen [closed]

Feeling great to join this network. I appreciate it. I have a question: is it better to use the word quote or cite in such situation talking with a hypocrite person? "When I quote you from him ...
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2 votes
1 answer
57 views

How can I use prepositions differently not normally?

I have seen some complex sentences, having complex grammar of prepositions. For example: “T is the temperature to which the accumulated distillate stream, formed in previous effects, cools down to ...
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8 votes
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Why is 'immune' used with 'to'?

A recent news item reported : ... they are also concerned about his argument in a 2009 legal article that a sitting president should be immune to prosecution. The OED states that the adjective '...
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Meaning and usage of ‘other than’? [closed]

I have questions about 'other than'... She couldn’t do anything about her bad luck other than suffer through it. 1) What’s the exact meaning and usage of 'other than' in this sentence? 2) Isn’t ...
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Is the phrase "the ease at which / the ease by which ..." correct

1) ** Is it correct to follow "ease" with "at which" such as in "The **ease at which you can carry this bag depends on the angle you hold it from" 2) Does anyone have a good source recommendation ...
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1 answer
310 views

Use of the preposition "by" along with "which" [duplicate]

There is a difference in the difficulty by which the two different objects can be lifted up. Is "by" correct here? Does "difficulty by which" sound natural? is there maybe a better alternative? ...
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1 vote
1 answer
308 views

Indirect object pronoun before direct object

I have seen a few people say that indirect objects that are in the form of a pronoun should be placed before the direct object in a sentence. Why is that? I didn’t know it mattered. For example: “I ...
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1 answer
571 views

Is it grammatically correct to place the object of preposition before the preposition? [duplicate]

In conversation, it's normal to say: What time do you have to be at the train station by? Note: What time do you have to be at the train station vs What time do you have to be at the train station ...
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How can I phrase this sentence so that it doesn't end in a preposition?

Whenever possible, I like to avoid ending sentences with prepositions because some people can be very picky about it. However, I am struggling with this one sentence in particular: "The hypothesis ...
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Preposition + relative clause - "This is the house about which I told you."

This is the house about which I told you. In the above sentence, the relative pronoun "which" is considered to be the prepositional complement of the preposition "about". 1.) If the relative pronoun ...
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13 votes
2 answers
2k views

Is the second "on" necessary in this sentence?

“It still makes economic sense” to put on as much weight on as efficiently as you can, to minimize losses” feedlot owner Tom Fanning told Bloomberg. https://www.voanews.com/a/mht-good-news-for-burger-...
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1 vote
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How to use apostrophe with plural object of preposition [duplicate]

Which apostrophe is correct? (There are multiple dogs.) One of the dogs' tails One of the dog's tails I believe it is the former but I'm not 100% certain. I found absolutely no guidance on this when ...
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1 vote
1 answer
212 views

A question about sentence-structure and relative clause

Here is the sentence. According to economic signaling theory, consumers may perceive the frequency with which an unfamiliar brand is advertised as a cue that the brand is of high quality. I have ...
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2 votes
2 answers
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"On a Desert" or "In a Desert" and Common Usage

I was reading to my daughter the other night and came across an awkward passage in Crockett Johnson's "Harold's Trip to the Sky": "There was nothing to see. He was in the middle of a desert. No ...
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1 answer
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Which preposition should follow "sympathies"

I want to ask an organization: Does your organization have any sympathies __ [such and such ideology (X)]. Which preposition should follow "sympathies?" I was thinking "to" might work, as if ...
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3 answers
191 views

What is the sense of "bosom labouring" here? [closed]

I've just came a cross the following sentence: It seemed to breathe from a bosom labouring under the deadliest terror. and can't puzzle out the meaning of this two words combined together in this ...
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Correct grammar / style for segments that share the same (lengthy) prepositional object

I'm having trouble with a sentence that uses two (or more) prepositional phrases, which share the same prepositional object. For example, I would like to turn these two statements: A main theme in ...
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0 votes
1 answer
759 views

the door to his room

I always think for ownership or assignment we should use an "of" word. For example, I think this phrase is correct: The door of his room but, I read a story book of Longman and I saw this phrase: The ...
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4 votes
2 answers
1k views

Wh-clause after a preposition

I've sometimes come across the expression 'speak for', not a phrasal as such, but an expression to say 'is a clear sign of' as in The regular attendance at the course speaks for its great success. ...
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-2 votes
1 answer
17k views

To interact to/with each other [closed]

I want to describe how objects interact [to or with] each other. Which preposition should I use here to show how these objects interact?
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2 answers
67 views

Do I need a "with" in the following sentence?

Usually, I know the answer. But the following sentence confuses me: Was he the man she had shared her flesh and feelings (with) for four years? Is the with necessary? Why or why not?
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2 answers
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He, together with she and I? [duplicate]

How do you write the following sentence: Marcelo, together with Angela and I, are going to... Marcelo, together with Angela and myself, are going to...
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1 answer
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Prepositions with the verb "ask": "ask questions from," "ask a question to"

"What questions do they ask a communication trainer?" or "What questions do they ask from a communication trainer?" Also, I know "She asked me a question" is what's generally used but just have a ...
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1 vote
5 answers
16k views

On/At/In someone's suggestion?

What, and why, is the right choice in these cases? (*) my supervisor's suggestion, I changed my schedule. Should (*) be: in, on, at, under,....?
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4 answers
3k views

Can I substitute 'to' for 'for' here in order to not repeat 'for' twice [closed]

I'm trying to rewrite this sentence, can someone suggest a grammatically correct (and better) sentence: I was not prepared for his calm enthusiasm for my question. I'm thinking something like: ...
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3 votes
1 answer
39k views

In or On Microsoft Excel's Table/Cells/Column

I have a rather odd question here. I am delivering a presentation to a wide audience of Excel users. How do you go about using prepositions when it comes down to Microsoft Excel's Worksheet, ...
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1 vote
4 answers
1k views

Omission of "being" after prepositions

I've heard from somewhere in this website that being can be deleted after almost every preposition... which aroused many questions as to the usage of being for me. Today, I encountered this sentence: ...
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