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Questions tagged [prefixes]

A prefix is an affix which is placed before the stem of a word

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2answers
190 views

Pre- : prevalent , predominant

I am a computer scientist who's trying to analyze and endcode the meaning of morphemes or more higher level of abstraction to be represented and stored in a numerical data. While processing the ...
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1answer
137 views

Finding a word that starts with the prefix ultra or ult [closed]

I'm trying to find a word that starts with the prefix ultra or ult. It also has to describe someone's motives when they go "beyond" what they seem. That's the only information that I have been given.
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On quadrants, quintants, sextants, octants, nonants, etc [closed]

I have searched the internet for how to form the following words, but have been unable to find an authoritative source. They are obviously formed with latinate prefixes, but if you look at the lists ...
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1answer
267 views

why are Plurals for thousand, million and such unit are not used commonly, like in amount description?

why don't we say 2 thousands instead 2 thousand (just an example) in spite of it being more than a unit amount and neither is it an uncountable noun.
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3answers
315 views

Prefix Meaning “At Most”?

Is there a prefix meaning "at most" or "capped at"? I'd like to describe a spherical cap (Wikipedia, Wolfram) that is at most a hemisphere. The blue solid in the diagram below shows the type of cap I'...
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1answer
3k views

Homeo- or homoeo-?

"Homeo-" seems to be more widely used nowadays to the extent that "homoeo-" is listed as a variant of it, and "homoeostasis" is listed as a variant of "homeostasis". However, there are multiple posts ...
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1answer
187 views

Are there any synonymous alternatives to the prefix “exo”? [closed]

I'm specifically looking for another prefix that has the same or a similar meaning to "exo".
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1answer
3k views

Examples of three prefixes in one word [closed]

Do you know words which consist of three prefixes (in one word)? It's difficult to find such examples, but I've read that there are such words in English.
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3answers
11k views

Is “encapture” a word?

I always thought that "encapture" is a word meaning "to capture". However, spellchecking softwares flag this term and a quick Google search shows that this term is not listed in any dictionary except ...
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2answers
792 views

Why does refrigerator have the prefix “re”? [closed]

Shouldn't it just be frigerator?? What I am specifically looking at is the prefix "re" [to add the meaning "do again", especially to verbs, e.g. rebuild, remarry] when most things you would put in ...
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1answer
699 views

Does “re-” in “resolve” mean repeating an action? [closed]

It seems to me that "solve a conflict" is not correct, but "resolve a conflict" is. Does "resolve" mean "solve" again? Does "re-" in "resolve" mean repeating the action of solving? in the cases ...
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1answer
828 views

On the etymology of some words using the prefix “trans” [closed]

According to the Wiktionary, the prefix "trans" is to be understood as Across, through, over, beyond, to or on the other side of, outside of. However, most of the words I can think of using this ...
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3answers
891 views

Is “extra-departmental” a real word?

I could only find a definition on Wiktionary, making it questionable. My team is looking to title something that refers to departments outside our own, but still internal to the company. As in, "...
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1answer
712 views

A prefix for to describe doing something in close distance

When we want to describe an action which is done over a (physical) far distance, we attach the prefix 'Tele-' to the proper word related to that action: TELEvision, TELEphone, TELEgraph etc. I am ...
4
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1answer
791 views

DIScomfort yet UNcomfortable

Why is the negation of comfort discomfort but the opposite of comfortable is uncomfortable? Or is the word "discomfortable" accepted too?
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2answers
811 views

Hyphens in words with prefixes like neo-Nazism

I have a question regarding the use of hyphens in words with certain prefixes. For example, Neo-Nazism Neo-Confucianism Neo-liberal are words with a hyphen, but Neoplatonism ...
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2answers
140 views

Can adjectives starting with a- precede the noun?

The prefix a- holds many entries in the dictionary. I am considered with one of them: a- prefix to; toward: aside | ashore. • in a specified state or manner: asleep | aloud. • in the ...
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5answers
803 views

What exactly is different between “outspoken”/“softspoken” and “unspoken”/“misspoken”?

My brain completely misinterprets the last 2 of these words every time I read them: When I hear X is "unspoken", I interpret it to mean nobody speaks about X. When I hear X is "misspoken", I ...
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2answers
240 views

Could “mismodify” be a word?

I've never seen it in any dictionary, and searching on Google gives fairly few, almost irrelevant results, but it seems like it could potentially be a word, albeit perhaps a technical one at that. It ...
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1answer
11k views

Use of hyphen with the prefix “post-”

Is there a rule governing the use of a hyphen with the prefix "post-"? Or is the use of the hyphen decided by convention in this case? In particular, I am concerned about the following sentence: ...
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3answers
10k views

Is Dr. the same as Doctor? Or how to distinguish these two? [closed]

First of all, English is my foreign language. I've never thought of this until the release of the film Dr. Strange the supreme sorcerer. My co-worker argued that Dr. means Doctor (as a job), while I ...
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0answers
131 views

Is there a category name for verbs beginning with 'be-'? Is 'be-' a general prefix for words?

I wonder about words like: Beseech Befallen Beholder (?) Bewitch Befool Befriend Befog and so on... Those words have always caught my attention, and I find them somewhat more sophisticated. My ...
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1answer
794 views

The half-prefixes

Why is it semicircle, hemisphere and demigod and not some other combination of prefix and root? I understand that the prefixes are relatively productive, meaning that where you can use one, you can ...
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2answers
1k views

Antiviral vs Anti-Viral [closed]

I work at an agency with a number of challenges related to nepotism and power, so I like to be super sure about my grammar critiques. The initiative I work under uses the word antiviral. However, my ...
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5answers
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Is “Untap” an equivalent of “Unleash?”

While attempting to assist another user on another Stack Exchange site I stumbled upon this marketing page for the Samsung SSD 850 EVO that—to my mind—oddly states: Untap your computer’s potential ...
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1answer
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Co-working or Coworking?

I'm proofreading a text for the magazine, and came across coworking. I prefer to spell it co-working with a hyphen -. I've looked on Ngrams, wikipedia, and several dictionaries, and as usual with ...
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1answer
575 views

Is the prefix “pre-” meaningless in the terms “pre-heated” and “pre-board”?

This question poses a paradox of meaning. The general question is whether, if two sentences (x and y) can be used in the same situation, with the same literal meaning, and x and y only differ in that ...
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1answer
1k views

What’s the deal with the prefix “re-” with the Latin root “ques”, “qui”, and “quearere”?

The Latin root is ques or qui as seen in words like question, quest, inquiry, and quiz. Very related to this Latin root is the root quearere, which seems to have a fair amount of influence on the ...
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1answer
155 views

Is this “over-negation” a grammatical phenomenon or pure coincidence?

To make things short, let's look at famous -- infamous, glorious -- inglorious The two pairs both illustrate what I temporarily refer to as "over-negation", in the sense that, for example, in ...
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1answer
575 views

Pronunciation of prefixes or letters like “acc-” , “ent-”, “tri-” in various words like accent, enter, trivial? [closed]

I am not a native English speaker and thus the variation of pronunciation always amazes me. How can the exact prefix or letters pronounced so differently in some words, for example: Accent is ...
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1answer
3k views

What does the prefix “aff” mean? [closed]

What does the prefix "aff" mean in the following words: affine, affirmative, affirm, affable, affection, affluent. Do they have some meaning in common?
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2answers
4k views

Which form would be correct: cyber security, cyber-security or cybersecurity?

I want to stop changing my mind, I've used all three of the forms cyber security, cyber-security or cybersecurity at different times. There have been previous discussions on this (e.g. here and here) ...
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3answers
4k views

What do you call the other bit of a word with a prefix

Let's say I have a word like unhappy. The "un" is called the prefix. What is the other bit called?
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3answers
6k views

Is “reoccurring” a word and is there any semantic difference with “recurring”?

The internet seems divided on this one. Although, e.g., the Merriam-Webster dictionary does not list the word "reoccurring", dictionary.com does list it as a variant of "occur", and the Oxford ...
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5answers
416 views

Adam lay ybounden. Any ys around these days?

Thanks for pointing out the similar question. Great, but note that I'm trying to find ... • is there any SPECIFIC examples/evidence around of yword yusage TODAY? • other than jokey usage, is there ...
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1answer
982 views

Undeletable vs Indeletable [closed]

Why do we say undeletable instead of indeletable. Sometimes with other words we use an in prefix, such as with indefatigable. I'm curious about un vs in.
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1answer
1k views

What's the word for the use of the wrong prefix or suffix?

For example if someone said unliterate instead of illiterate or discluded instead of excluded? Is there a word for this kind of grammatical error?
3
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1answer
269 views

poetic or artistic uses of prefix “proto”

The prefix "proto" is found in technical writing, meaning "first" (as in the first form of a chemical compound or biological process). But it's an evocative word for me as a composer when used to ...
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1answer
2k views

“Dis-” prefix meaning and etymology [closed]

Most native speakers are used to "dis-" as a prefix having a negative or opposite connotation (disengaged, dissatisfied, disinterested). However, in rare cases, "dis-" is actually an amplifying prefix,...
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1answer
630 views

“non-assigned” or “un-assigned” inventory?

I am writing up a procedure regarding inventory that is not assigned to any specific employee of the company and would like to know if I should refer to this inventory as "non-assigned" inventory, or "...
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2answers
8k views

The prefix “post” can it mean before? [closed]

The posterior is the behind, the postero-dorsal is behind the antero-dorsal. But when we're talking about time, postmodern means "of, relating to, or being an era after a modern one". So are there ...
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1answer
2k views

Does “pro-” always precede “pre-” in a sequence? Why?

In biological vocabulary, sometimes both pre- and pro- are used as prefixes to indicate something earlier in a sequence. For example, pro-B cells develop into pre-B cells, which eventually develop ...
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2answers
1k views

Prefixes for the opposite of “perishable”: unperishable, non-perishable, imperishable [closed]

Unperishable, non-perishable or imperishable? I'm quite confused about which prefix is used for the opposite of perishable. If more than one is used, what are the differences between them? Searching ...
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0answers
117 views

Are there any formal infixes? [duplicate]

Infixes appear in words such as 'absolutely' to form 'abso-bloody-lutely', or as 'educate' to 'edu-ma-cate' in the Simpsons. I was wondering if there were any formal infixes. The only ones I could ...
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0answers
245 views

Using superlatives as prefixes, order of significance [duplicate]

This is kind of an opinion-leaning question. I'm naming a set of items based on their order of significance. Their names will be prefixed with the following superlatives: super, ultra, mega, hyper, ...
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1answer
310 views

Does “unrenamed” mean “not yet renamed”?

I am writing a software and the following description cannot be more than 15-20 characters long. I need to concisely say “files that have not been renamed”. I think “unrenamed files” works, but ...
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1answer
300 views

On throwing alligators through windows

Over at the excellent Lowering the Bar there is a discussion on throwing alligators through windows:- Let’s apply that definition to our infenestrated alligator. Absolutely, but first let’s ...
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2answers
367 views

Is/could “noctophyte” be a word?

Let me preface this by saying that I am trying to come up with an interesting-sounding name for gamedev purposes. I'm looking for a potentially imaginary word that can be given a logical definition. "...
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4answers
464 views

Prefix for three-way logic

As a programmer I usually want variable names that makes sense. I now stumbled upon a variable that can take three different values, so called three-valued logic. In this case I am trying to name a ...
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2answers
1k views

Preservation of the en- prefix form of Latin negative prefix in-, in enemy & enmity

The en- in enemy is a prefix meaning "not": the origin is Latin inimicus, from in- + amicus — a "not friend" or an "unfriend" (Online Etymology Dictionary—enemy). The Latin in- changed to en- when ...