Questions tagged [prefixes]

A prefix is an affix which is placed before the stem of a word

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1answer
27 views

Hyphen between 2 words when prefix is in front of the 2 words

What's the correct way to put a prefix in front of something that's 2 or more words? Pre-Neolithic Revolution or pre-Neolithic-Revolution Pro-affirmative action or pro-affirmative-action Post-Civil ...
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What is the meaning behind the prefix “American”? [closed]

American Beauty American Psycho American tragedy And so on. The list could be made much longer. Why is "American X" used so frequently in various titles and sayings? The two first ...
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16answers
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A word that means 'most important'?

I tried to find a single word that means "most important", but I couldn't. I want it to be able to express what's missing below: If you get hurt, the _ thing to do is to stay calm. It would need ...
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If abnormal means “not normal”, then why are the original, native people called “aboriginal” people?

Shouldn't they be called original people as opposed to aboriginal people?
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55 views

Nuancing the prefixes “meta-”, “hyper-”, and “super-”. Any insight that'd help? [closed]

When detailing the definition of these prefixes, I'm usually faced with a deadlock as to which would fit the proper usage. Though, in general, I'd still like to understand each prefix's nuance to each ...
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1answer
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Should we include the prefix Mrs. when we tell others our real name? [closed]

My question is so simple. We call a man with the prefix Mr. and a married woman with the prefix Mrs., followed by her husband's surname, right? Now, is it grammatically okay to include these prefixes ...
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7answers
134k views

Which is higher — “hyper-”, “ultra-” or “super-”?

According to OED, hyper-: over, beyond, over much, above measure ultra-: beyond super-: over, above, higher than They all have the meaning "higher than", but what is the order of them?...
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1answer
243 views

How can you determine whether a word with the pseudo- prefix should be hyphenated?

I am in a bit of a quandary over conflicting results in dictionary entries about the inclusion of a hyphen in some of the words containing the pseudo- prefix. An example of one of these words is ...
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4answers
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Why is the prefix “Trans” shortened to “X”? [duplicate]

In technical literature as well as aircraft user interfaces where there is not enough space to write the whole word, the prefix "trans" is shortened to "x". Transmit -> Xmit ...
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1answer
36 views

“beginning” is to “prefix” as “end” is to “suffix” as “middle” is to… what?

The word "prefix" describes something affixed to the beginning of a word and the word "suffix" describes something affixed to the end of a word. What is the analog of these for ...
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0answers
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Why is the “r” doubled in “arrhythmia”? [duplicate]

Why is the "r" doubled in "arrhythmia" relative to "rhythmia"? I'm guessing it's because English resists hyphenation of prefixes and suffixes ("a-rhythmia"), ...
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3answers
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The pronunciation of words which begins 'con' and 'com'

I know there is no strict rule on pronunciation of words in English but here my question is about the words which begin with 'con' and 'com', more than asking general rule. When I look at the words ...
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5answers
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“Irregardless” vs. “irrespective”

Why is irrespective considered a proper word but irregardless is not?
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3answers
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How can pre be used

What are rules or style guidelines when adding "pre" to the beginning of words. I know that this called a prefix and that illustrates my point. How/when can pre be attached without a hyphen? Example:...
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0answers
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Do all “prefixes” can be use as “combining forms” or just some of them can be?

I wonder if all English prefixes can be used as "combining forms" or just some of them can be play role as "prefix" and combine with other words or affixes to form "compound forms". e.g "Chron-" ...
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1answer
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Determing the lexical category of a word based on the affixes attached

I am currently taking a Linguistics course and am learning about affixes. Through reading the textbook and following the lectures, I have realized that certain prefixes and suffixes are attached to ...
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2answers
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What prefix should I use to address individuals younger that 18 yrs?

Many summer programs/university applications require me to provide a prefix I would prefer to be called by. I always type "Mr.", but as I'm younger than 18, is this appropriate usage? Should I just ...
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2answers
18k views

“Reset” or “re-set”?

As far as I know there are two different meanings of the word "reset": to restore an object/value to a previous/initial state - that's the most widely use of the word;  to set the value/...
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3answers
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Are there many words that come with “a” as the prefix to mean “no, non” like “asymptomatic” and “apolitical”?

I didn’t know the word, “asymptomatic” to my shame, until I heard the following narration in AP Radio news aired on October 27 through AFN network: “Dr. Anthony Fauci with the NIH says CDC ...
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3answers
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What is the proper prefix meaning “bone” or “skeleton”?

There are many borrowed words from Greek and Latin that are used as prefixes in English. Examples: pyro- relating to fire, hydro- relating to water, geo- relating to the earth etc. What is the ...
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2answers
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Why do so many prefixes mean “Not”

While trying to think of a brief list of English prefixes that mean "not" or "opposite to" in some way, I was wondering why so many exist. As English has roots in so many languages, I was hoping ...
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1answer
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Opposite prefix for 'ethno-'

Is there one? A cursory Google search yielded none. My best guess would be something close to exic-; not that I can think of any relevant words in this context using that.
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3answers
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Do other ‘suffix­es’ be­sides “‑ere/‑ence/‑ither” ex­ist for com­pos­ing loca­tive and di­rec­tional ‘ad­verbs’ like “here/hither/hence”?

Years ago read­ing J R R Tolkien’s Sil­mar­il­lion, I learned the de­light­ful suffixes ‑ence and ‑ither used in this three­fold set of paired words with these mean­ings: hence: from this nearby place ...
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1answer
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Why is it immigrate and emigrate, but import and export (not emport)?

Is there a concrete linguistic reason why im- and ex- are used together in the case of goods but im- and em- in the case of people? Clearly, exigrate and emport sound odd, but are they a result of the ...
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8answers
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Logical meaning of the word “understand”

To understand something means to be aquainted with it, to know it very well, know how it "ticks". This is one of the basic words that has a direct "meaning" in mind. However, if we "dissect" it, is ...
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Numeral prefixes of tidal constituents [closed]

If tidal constituents with frequencies of one, two, three, and four cycles per day (respectively, periods of one, a half, a third, and a fourth of a day) were to be termed systematically based on ...
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11answers
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Why is the 'anti' in 'anti-semitism'?

If 'ageism' is the prejudice or discrimination against aged persons, 'sexism' discrimination against a person's sex and 'racism' discrimination against someone's race, then why is not Semitism the ...
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5answers
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“Undistinguishable” vs. “indistinguishable”

Is there a difference between these two words? To me, it seems that undistinguishable is more where you can't tell what it is, and indistinguishable seems to be where they're the same. It seems a lot ...
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2answers
1k views

What are antonym-like prefixes to the Greek “crypto”?

What is a prefix that is similar to "public", or "accessible", or "ubiquitous" such that it is harmonious with the spirit of currency needing to be of public domain, widely adopted, accessible, etc. ...
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1answer
4k views

Pre-requisite vs prerequisite

Looking up this on English exchange I couldn't seem to find a single source of truth: Instance 1 - "Prerequisite" in search: "Prerequisite for" vs. "prerequisite to" ...
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2answers
379 views

Nonabelian or non-abelian?

I asked this question on Mathematics Stack Exchange (here) but I haven't had any luck so far. Allow me to copy the question: If I wanted to be scrupulous about correct spelling, is there any reason ...
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2answers
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Difference between “infinite” and “indefinite”

I have found that infinite means "very great in amount of degree" while indefinite refers to "a period of time that has no defined end." Is there a subtle, nuanced difference between these terms, or ...
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2answers
7k views

Is “Reverend” a title, honorific, style or merely an adjective

Is it proper to introduce a clergyman as Reverend Johnson or is it more proper to refer to him as the Reverend Mr. Johnson ... or the Reverend Dr. Johnson, as the case may be? "This is Reverend John ...
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4answers
396 views

To either revive or kill something

I'm wondering if there's a word out there for me. I think that a clever use of a prefix would do as well. So, to revive means to make alive, and to kill means to make dead. Is there a word that means ...
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1answer
507 views

Is “aggr-” a prefix and what does it mean? [closed]

I'm not sure if "aggr-" is a prefix but I can see some words starting with it. like: Aggregate Aggressive Aggravate Aggrieve Aggrandize I'm here to ask if it has some meanings or they are all ...
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Distinction between prefixes 'super-' and 'extra-' in similar contexts

From my understanding, both the prefixes super- and extra- can mean above or beyond, though a possible distinction could be as follows (from the answer to this question): ...using super-something ...
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1answer
157 views

Difference between the -genous and -ginous word suffixes

I was wondering whether anyone knows the exact difference between the English suffixes -agenous and -aginous. I believe the difference is that the first suffix has to do with describing the rough ...
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1answer
83 views

Is the “en-” verb prefix redundant? [closed]

The verb prefix en- seems redundant to me. For example a book titled 'Something' a book entitled 'Something' Are these identical in meaning, or is there some nuance?
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1answer
172 views

inter- prefix means between but interact has a whole different meaning than -inter or act, why is that?

I just started to dig into suffixes and prefixes. But I couldn't understand how do they exactly change the meaning of the word that they are appended. For example re- means again, retake means take ...
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3answers
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What does “autolyco-sentimental” mean?

Wagner is said to have described Mayerbeer's operas as follows: (translated into English and originally written in German, probably.) "Meyerbeer ... wanted a monstrous, piebald, historico-romantic, ...
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3answers
12k views

in-able ? un-able?

Suffix -able adds meaning "being able" to a word. I know that. Prefix in- and un- mean "not" or some negative meaning. I know that. However, when it comes to mixing of these, I am confused. ...
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1answer
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How to use two prefixes “comma” “and” stem in two situations [duplicate]

My native language is Dutch. We have a subtle, but useful way of combining the ingredients: Prefix (+ comma) + and + Prefix + stem. However, I do not know whether the same rules apply in the English ...
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2answers
25k views

When is the prefix non- used vs un-?

Specifically, my students were asking why the terms "nonliving" and "undead" are the way they are. (And why "unliving" and "nondead" seem wrong.)
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Transcription and pronunciation of the 'un-' prefix in General American English

What's the correct transcription and pronunciation of the 'un-' prefix in General American English? Cambridge Online dictionary provides the following transcription: /ʌn/ It's the same in words with ...
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2answers
135 views

Service will be 'unavailable Saturday' vs '…unavailable on Saturday' [duplicate]

I want to perfect this system message the most I can and am over-thinking the use of the proper words. Is it better to say "Email will be unavailable Saturday 12/29 from 5 PM to 9 PM" or "Email will ...
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2answers
924 views

Do prefixes & suffixes have antonyms?

Question Do prefixes & suffixes have antonyms? As in, is it possible for a prefix or suffix to not have an antonym? Example Google defines "-gon" as: -gon combining form in nouns ...
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2answers
4k views

Is “to” a prefix in English?

I was thinking about the words "today" and "tonight" and trying to think of what "to" means in these words. A cursory Google search turns up no results for "to-" in any prefix lists.
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3answers
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Use of hypens with “auto”: autopopulate, auto-populate, or auto populate?

I've done a fair amount of research (like here), but I can't find any examples of hyphen rules with "auto". Microsoft Word doesn't take "autopopulate", but will accept either auto-populate or auto ...
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1answer
3k views

Is “pre-prepared” redundant?

I've noticed recently the "word" pre-prepared popping up in my daily life, and if my completely selection-biased anecdotes are any evidence, it seems to be catching on. Is there any reason why the '...
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1answer
89 views

Which one is the original prefix: con-, com-, or cor-?

Which one is the original prefix: con-, com-, or cor-? And which ones are variants?

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