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Questions tagged [predicative-complement]

The tag has no usage guidance.

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Can a predicative complement be expressed by an ing-form?

This books can be regarded as following in the footsteps of such an epic as War and Peace. Is the sentence correct? Does the bold phrase (ing-form) function as a predicative complement here?
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0answers
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Function of PPs with predicative complements

According to CaGEL* (e.g. p.636 ff), prepositions can take predicative complements, as in [1] She worked as a waitress [2] He passed for dead [3] I took you for granted [4] They left him for ...
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3answers
162 views

What exactly falls under the label of “complement”?

There seems to be a lot of contradicting beliefs out there regarding complements and what they cover -- or maybe I am just confusing myself. However, I cannot seem to find an answer that I understand. ...
3
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1answer
90 views

Correct or not: noun and adjective being predicative together

I'm thinking about such a sentence: He is a lawyer, arrogant and smart. or He is an idiot, arrogant and short-sighted. Please note that here I just want to list the noun and the ...
6
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7answers
2k views

Can a noun work as an adjective, and the adjective as a noun?

Hazel Eyes I found the following paragraph in the guycounseling.com blog article “Hazel Eyes: Learn Why People with Greenish Eye Color are Rare!”, containing the two words “hazel eyes”: Hazel eyes ...
4
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1answer
102 views

Do metaphorical agents follow special rules?

While I can easily parse this sentence, something feels grammatically incorrect and I can't figure out what rule would make it right or wrong. "Fatigue from traveling had him in bed by midnight." ...
0
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1answer
36 views

They are not merely <inconveniences/an inconvenience>, they are <dangers/a danger> to health

This Guardian article titled "William Wordsworth review – inspiration and smoking chimneys" has this passage: It is 14 years since the publication of Lyrical Ballads. Wordsworth’s income from ...
2
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0answers
276 views

Which verb do I use in: “All you need in life is/are coffee and good grammar”? [duplicate]

Should I use 'is' or 'are' in the sentence below? All you need in life is/are coffee and good grammar. This question is different from Agreement in "[Singular Noun] Is/Are [Plural Noun]"...
2
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2answers
156 views

“I'm afraid she's gone too far this time” - Relative Clauses

I am going to have to explain all the parts of this sentence to a class, but I am having a little trouble identifying all the parts. The sentence is: I'm afraid she's gone too far this time. This ...
3
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1answer
164 views

He laid bare his soul

Generally, a predicative complement (PC) comes after the predicand: (1) He laid his soul bare. Here, 'bare' is the PC, and 'his soul' the predicand. But when the predicand, genearlly a noun ...
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1answer
3k views

the majority of whom are male or males

Should I use singular or plural form of male here? I think it should be males. Am I correct? Social and cultural traditions often make it difficult for aid workers, the majority of whom are [male/...
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3answers
107 views

“starting steep and leveling off horizontal” – adjective or adverb

Are steep and horizontal correctly written as adjectives or should they be adverbs in the following sentence? Scaling around the trunk leads to a huge branch that expands out the other side ...
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2answers
4k views

Six feet/foot five: Does adding “inches” affect the grammatical form of “foot”?

Is it possible to say "six feet five" (inches are left out here)? Or is "six foot five" the only correct variant? Does incluing "inches" affect the grammatical form of "foot"?
0
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1answer
107 views

subject verb agreement: “the downside are the messages” [duplicate]

Which is the correct one: the big downside is the imperfect messages the user gets. the big downside are the imperfect messages the user gets. I am almost sure the second one is correct with "...
2
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1answer
349 views

What is the grammar structure? “I am not going to stand here watching you do it”?

Is this sentence correct? I am not going to stand here watching you do it. I saw it in an article. If it is - and I think it is - why is "watching" a gerund? What is the grammar structure? Is it a ...
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2answers
230 views

The main ingredient is blueberries or the main ingredient is blueberry?

Which sentence is grammatically accurate or they both acceptable? "The main ingredient is blueberries" sounds better to me. "The main ingredient" is indicative of one type of ingredient, so does that ...
1
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2answers
834 views

Has the use of the subject pronoun after the verb “to be” become archaic?

"Is that your wretched husband on the phone again, my love?" "Yes, of course it's him!" Well, we all might think the use of "him" instead of "he" is wrong, but following "is" with "he" in ...
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3answers
2k views

What specifically is the difference between a 'content clause' and a 'complement clause'?

Here a complement clause is defined as: a notional sentence or predication that is an argument of a predicate Here a content clause is defined as: a subordinate clause that provides content ...
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3answers
250 views

Does “turned a bright blue” contain a predicate nominative or predicate adjective?

The liquid in the bowl turned a bright blue. Please tell me if blue is a predicate nominative or a predicate adjective in this sentence and please explain why.
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1answer
333 views

Is it possible for a sentence to have a direct object and predicate adjective?

In school, I was taught that action verbs have direct objects and linking verbs have predicate adjectives or nominatives; however, some verbs seem to use both simultaneously. For example, in "I made ...
2
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1answer
312 views

Important to learn is this stuff

This song is fun to sing. This pizza is too hot to eat. Is the infinitive there considered a complement of the predicate adjective?
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1answer
160 views

Is it right to say “Draw it big”, and if so, does that mean that “big” is an adverb?

If I have already talked about drawing a circle and want to say to draw a big circle, is it right to say it like this: Draw it big. For this next sentence, would I need an adverb in the blank or ...
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2answers
943 views

When should we use an adjective instead of an adverb after verbs(main verb)?

Here's the SAT sentence that raised my curiosity: Strong wind, sweeping almost unchecked over great distances, is a prime component of the grassland climate. Although I know the sentence above ...
0
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1answer
288 views

Can “ were known” be considered as a copular verb?

I have to analyze the valency pattern of this clause "These glorious full colour prints that resulted were known as brocade pictures". Can I consider "were known" as a copular verb followed by the ...
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4answers
3k views

Why do we ask “Who is she?” in the subjective form? [closed]

If "her" is objective and "she" is subjective, why do we say: 'Who is she?' instead of: 'Who is her?' apart from the latter sounding a bit strange? For instance: 'That car belongs to her.' ...
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7answers
5k views

Why “be king”, not “be a king”? [duplicate]

I've heard people say "be king" (as in "I can't wait to be king") in movies and TV. Why don't they say "be a king"? Which is correct?
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2answers
402 views

“end up” peculiar properties

Just putting together a lexical lesson on making life changes and thought I'd use a sentence with 'end up'. However, when I ran through various sample sentences I noticed that it is quite an unusual ...
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4answers
616 views

Is 20 dollars here a direct object or a predicate complement? 'This book cost me 20 dollars.'

In this sentence: This book cost me 20 dollars. Is 20 dollars a direct object or a predicative complement?
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1answer
463 views

Not my cup of tea

Heard an English teacher claim that: "Dogs is not my cup of tea" is correct; whereas "Dogs are not my cup of tea" is incorrect. The explanation was that the verb form of 'to be' must agree with ...
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1answer
423 views

The function of “young”in these sentence

He left home young He died young Does the word "young" act as either a predicative complement or a incidental adverbial in those sentences?And how to distinguish them?
3
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0answers
658 views

Does a complement phrase always follow a be verb? [closed]

Summary question Is there a formal name for the entire portion of a sentence that is connected to the copula?" Is it "complement"? Background Be verb can be followed by various things: a noun (He ...
2
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1answer
287 views

“I am X” vs. “X is me”

Is there a difference in grammaticality, meaning, or usage between the following two ways of phrasing the same statement? I am sure that I am the appropriate candidate for this position. – versus ...
1
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1answer
175 views

“was” or “were” when there is number mismatch between subject and predicative complement [duplicate]

I have a question about this sentence: The only thing he feared more than the wolves were the swirling buzzards. I believe it to be correct, but someone suggested that the "were" should be changed ...
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4answers
851 views

verb or adjective in “The blue page is *stapled* to the red page”?

Consider the following sentence. The blue page is stapled to the red page. Although "stapled" is (apparently) past-tense, nonetheless the above sentence is clearly expressing something about the ...
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1answer
2k views

He died [as?] a broken man

He died a broken man. One of my students came across this sentence in an article, and a quick search for "he died a * man" yields a plethora of similar ones. I'm fairly certain this sentence is ...
12
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3answers
18k views

“That was me” vs. “That was I” [duplicate]

When telling a story about myself from the past, I have found myself in an internal debate over whether the correct way to segue into the present is: That was me twelve years ago. Or: That was ...
3
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2answers
274 views

Who is Greek president vs Who is THE Greek President

I saw this in a quiz on Stuff: Who is Greek president? Surely the word "the" should be in there somewhere? But I get the feeling I've heard things like "US President Barack Obama" instead of "The ...
12
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2answers
870 views

How come “John is friends with Jane”?

The usage in the question title seems common enough to me, though it may be more common in Britain. But I can't exactly see what "part of speech" the word friends is here, and I can't come up with ...
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5answers
20k views

Is there any other way you can “wax” as you do when you “wax philosophical”?

The wax in the phrase "wax philosophical" is a pretty strange bird. Its wax is obviously not the ordinary definition of wax, which my dictionary summarizes as an "oily, water-resistant substance", a ...
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2answers
14k views

Agreement in “[Singular Noun] Is/Are [Plural Noun]”?

My fish's native habitat is rice fields. My fish's native habitat are rice fields. Which one is correct? I'm pretty sure it's the first, since 'is' modifies 'habitat,' but it still sounds weird...
27
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8answers
112k views

Which one is correct to say: “It's me” or “It's I”?

I was taught at school that the following expression is not grammatically correct: Who is there? It's me. The correct one is: Who is there? It's I. Can you let me know which one is accurate? ...
28
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2answers
76k views

Which is correct: “This is her” or “This is she”? [duplicate]

Upon answering the telephone, the person calling asks if Joan is available. If Joan is the person who answered the phone, should she say "This is her" or "This is she"?