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Questions tagged [predicate-frames]

The tag has no usage guidance.

0
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2answers
62 views

Does the verb “ban” take a gerund or infinitive as its complement? [closed]

Which one below is correct while using the verb ban? Plastic bottle using was banned by government in the country. Government banned to use plastic bottle in the country. Plastic bottle was banned ...
2
votes
2answers
83 views

“It's ok to somebody” sentence structure

I corrected a student as she had made the sentence "it's ok to Martin". I know that this sentence structure is incorrect, she asked why I had made the correction and I am having difficulty explaining ...
-1
votes
1answer
42 views

imperative to -ing [duplicate]

Which one is right? the degree is imperative to consolidating my grasp on concepts and keeping me abreast of upcoming upgrades the degree is imperative to consolidate my grasp on concepts and keep me ...
0
votes
2answers
59 views

Is expression “It does us no harm.” grammatically correct?

I would write it with "to": "It does to us no harm." or "It does no harm to us". Similar example from https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/do-to "I’ll never forgive him for ...
0
votes
2answers
52 views

“To agree with someone”: is that prepositional phrase an adverbial or a nominal one?

In this sentence: I agree with you. What is the function of the prepositional phrase ”with you” there? Is it an adverb or noun? If it is an adverb, then what type of adverb is this?
6
votes
2answers
766 views

Verbal regency using “afraid”

I am a Portuguese speaker and in my mother tongue there is something called 'verbal regency', and I think there ought to be something similar in English! Since I am also an English teacher I told one ...
1
vote
0answers
118 views

Does the verb “enable” take a bare-infinitive complement like “let” or a to-infinitive complement like “allow”? [duplicate]

How can you predict which verbs take which type of infinitive as their complements? For example, is the to before open here mandatory, forbidden, or optional? The Gold Monetization Scheme will ...
3
votes
1answer
7k views

proud to be & proud of being

I have the following two sentences which I would like to confirm the difference in meaning for. I am proud to be a nurse. I am proud of being a nurse. I'm mainly wondering about the difference in ...
0
votes
2answers
404 views

Passive voice sentence [closed]

I saw an idiom in the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, be had, defined there as: to be tricked or fooled by someone And I saw its usage like this She doesn’t want to buy a used car because she’s ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

difference in meaning between 2 phrases [duplicate]

I need to know the difference between these two sentences 1)He stopped to playing football 2)He stopped playing football
1
vote
0answers
230 views

Infinitive of Purpose or For [duplicate]

Could you please tell me which usage is correct ? 'I need money to start a business' 'I need money for starting a business' Actually the first one sounds more natural to me and also I know for is ...
102
votes
4answers
373k views

“Replace with” versus “replace by”

I often see "replace with" and "replace by" used interchangeably, but this doesn't sound right to me: I replaced that component by this one. I would use "with" in such a sentence. "By" only seems ...
0
votes
1answer
38k views

“Support on the project” or “support with the project” [closed]

What would be the correct preposition to use? Thanks for your support on/with the project.
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Differences between Case Frames and Semantic role labeling

I'm learning about some basic linguistics theory and have come across case frame analysis and semantic role labeling as methods of determining agents within sentences, and arguments for verbs. ...
20
votes
6answers
8k views

How does one know when to use a gerund or an infinitive?

As a native speaker of English, the gerund version of this sentence sounds better: infinitive: When used together in chains, extension methods are an unprecedented tool to produce extremely ...
49
votes
4answers
45k views

When should a verb be followed by a gerund instead of an infinitive?

Some verbs are followed by ing, e.g. I enjoy swimming. We can't say I enjoy to swim. Likewise, some verbs are followed by to, e.g. I decided to make a plan. Which particular verbs are followed by ...