Questions tagged [predicate-adjectives]

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25 views

Can the noun eyewitness be used properly without a preceding article?

Today I was writing an email calling somebody "eyewitness to" some event, but it was marked as incorrect and it was suggested I precede it with an article; i.e. an eyewitness, instead. But ...
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1answer
38 views

Adverb vs. Adjective use [closed]

We typically use adverbs to describe verbs, but there are exceptions. Would you rather say 'You glow different' or 'You glow differently'? Are both acceptable?
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What is the difference between a predicate nominative/predicate adjectives and a subject complement?

For example, the sentence "John was a policeman" or "Ben was angry." Both describe the subject, so I'd call them subject complements. But they could also be a predicate nominative ...
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0answers
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Do you think 'alone' can be used as an attribute adjective, ie. before a noun

OED concludes it to be "rare" now. I'm wondering if native English speakers find these quotes too dated and unacceptable for today's English. 1668 Howe - Had this been the alone folly. 1873 ...
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66 views

Hyphenation of compound adjective as object complement

Consider these three cases: Here is the up-to-date information. Mark this information up-to-date. This information is up to date. Those are spelled the ways that feel correct to me, but I'm not ...
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1answer
313 views

What kind of verb classification is "causative"?

I understand why "causative" verbs like "let" and "allow" are described this way, but I don't understand how this classification relates to other verb descriptors. Is &...
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2answers
117 views

Adjectives acting in the capacity of adverbs? Or just accumulative adjectives?

You seem scary happy. That house is scary big. Not sure if I am over-reading it, but it seems to me here "scary" functions in the capacity of adverb modifying the adjective that follows: ...
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13 views

Adjectives describing quantity

What is the difference between indefinite adjectives and adjectives of quantity. Are indefinite adjectives and adjectives of quantity are same.
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0answers
48 views

Part of speech of "likely"

It is likely to rain. Here likely is a predicate adjective with to rain as the complement (correct me if I'm wrong). Who took the cookie? It was likely Bob. Is likely also a predicate adjective ...
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1answer
153 views

only linking verbs with predicate adjectives and nominatives?

Can only linking verbs have predicate adjectives and predicate nominatives as complements? If action verbs can have predicates as well then it would be really helpful to me if you could please share ...
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0answers
107 views

Gerund or a predicate adjective?

In sentences like "but now it is running" or "but now it is standing" What are the words running/standing? I believe they're verbs/gerunds but I have some friends who think they are predicate ...
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2answers
76 views

Can a phrasal adjective be placed AFTER a noun? [closed]

If phrasal adjectives can be placed after nouns, what are some examples?
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1answer
2k views

It sounds well or it sounds good? [duplicate]

Is it possible and correct to use "well" with "to sound"? I am under the impression that most natives find it wrong. For example: 1 The guitar sounds good. - OK 2 The guitar sounds well. - Possible? ...
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1answer
116 views

Is “A increases the bigger B becomes” a legal English sentence pattern? Is it really a disguised “the more X, the more Y” pattern?

For many years I’ve been using constructions of two interrelated clauses where each of the two verbs comes with a comparative adverb or adjective of some sort (so either with more or less, or else ...
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3answers
1k views

adverbs after linking verbs

They write we must use adjectives rather than adverbs after linking verbs. For example https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/taste_2: Food can taste sweet like sugar. But here's ...
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3answers
4k views

Why is "sad" not a verb? [closed]

I'm learning English grammar now for the first time, and I find it extremely confusing. A verb is defined as an action, an occurrence, or a state of being. Whether mental, physical, or ...
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1answer
1k views

Is 'white' an adverb in "the lamp will flash white"?

What is the role of 'white' in the following sentence? The lamp on the machine will flash white when you restart it. It seems like it is an adverb here, but is it possible to use colours as ...
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1answer
344 views

The predicate nominative and the predicate adjective is to subjective complements as the ___ and the ___ is to objective complements

What do we call those words which are adjectives used as objective complements and nouns/pronouns used as objective complements See the terms that describe adjectives or nouns/pronouns used as ...
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2answers
601 views

Is "something red" an example of ellipsis or adjectival positioning

I want to better understand why the construction something + [adjective] makes grammatical sense. Background: I was recently reading a Washington Post article and came across the following sentence. ...
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3answers
2k views

Can adjectives be placed in front of verbs, e.g. “The duck was busy diving for food”?

The duck was busy diving for food. The duck was busily diving for food. Are both sentences grammatically correct? If the first one is correct, does it mean that adjectives can be placed in ...
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1answer
1k views

How to tell the difference between predicate adjectives and action verbs

While analyzing essays, I often get confused between whether a word is a predicate adjective of an action verb. I found the definition of a predicate adjective to be "An adjective used in the ...
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2answers
804 views

Adjectives used with intransitive verbs in lieu of adverbs

I certainly wouldn't argue that "I feel good" should be replaced with "I feel well," but I have forgotten what we used to call the adjective in this type of construction. Adjective predicate? ...
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2answers
262 views

Is there a difference between "good" and "well" when they are connected to subject via linking verb? [duplicate]

John is feeling well. John is feeling good. "well" is an adverb and "good" is an adjective. Is #2 grammatically correct at all or is it ok to construct Subject + Linking Verb + Adjective ...
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2answers
6k views

Non verbal predicates in English

Is a non-verbal predicate a synonymous term for "nominal predicate"? And moreover, do non-verbal predicates only appear with linking verbs or can also appear in other types of constructions? I ...
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2answers
5k views

Correct use of "rid of"

From what I understood, "rid of" is used when I want to express that particular object will be disposed of something. "Get rid of something," on the other hand, does not specify the object. According ...
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4answers
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Differences between Verb + to be + adjectives and Verb + adjective

If you have a more illustrative title, feel free to change it. I searched but I couldn't find one. This may be an easy and trivial question; if so, I am sorry. What are the differences between ...
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4answers
1k views

The verb "to get" + particle ...?

In the phrase "to get all crazy" am I correct when I say that the "all crazy" is a particle phrase? Example: I'm up for tonight's party. I'm going to get all crazy.