Questions tagged [postpositive]

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1answer
67 views

Postpositive “concerned”: temporary state of affairs

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language reads Postpositive present (or absent) denotes a temporary state of affairs: compare the present government. The same applies to involved and ...
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1answer
52 views

clothing “DISTINCTIVE TO” a particular position

Habit: to dress somebody in clothing distinctive TO a particular position or office (literary) Microsoft® Encarta® 2009. What is the meaning of TO here? Is distinctive a postnominal adjective? I ...
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1answer
118 views

It's the size of a brick; What size shirt/shoes do you take?; I have a daughter your age

What is the grammar of the English words "size", "age", etc? According to Quirk (1985:1293) Some noun phrases of measure, denoting size, age, etc, can also be postposed: A man the size of a ...
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1answer
127 views

Usage and order of “galore”: an adjective, but looks like an adverb

It is common to put adverbs of manner after a direct object. But is it grammatically correct to put an adjective after noun? As in: Since then there have been reports, inquiries and guidance galore. ...
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0answers
51 views

nouns separated from postpositive adjectives by a comma

If geometrical patterns below is separated from marked by a comma that means marked refers to the flower beds. Is this reasoning correct? I once read something about this but I cannot seem to remember ...
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2answers
594 views

Can I say “I have two pens less”, and “I have two dollars less”? [closed]

There were 50 students in class. The teacher gave out 50 pens to the students (the students got a total of 50 pens). The teacher gave 50 pens to every student (every student got fifty pens each). ...
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2answers
57 views

Why is it “Shaun the Sheep” but “Peter Rabbit”? Or Pepa Pig, but Dorothy the Dinosaur

Epithets. I can add some more examples, for example: Charles the Great, Charles the Rash, Edward the Confessor BUT The Brothers Grimm, the Emperor Jones What is the rule or difference in meaning ...
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2answers
164 views

Should a foreign phrase that modifies an English noun go before or after that noun in English?

I’m thinking of the placement of the Latin phrase, ad hominem as it is used in English, not as it is used in Latin. Should it precede or follow its noun? In other words, are both of these two ...
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2answers
2k views

Presidents Elect or President-Elects?

If you have several presidents awaiting inauguration, should we refer to them as Presidents Elect or President-Elects?
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1answer
212 views

Can I put “all” after nouns?

I came upon sentence: I am delighted that Lynch has found space for Wisden, Liddell and Scott’s Greek–English Lexicon, and the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, estimable works all (or at ...
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1answer
85 views

Can “same” be postpositive?

Can we put the sentence "same as" after a noun? For example, He drives the same car as you. He drives the car same as you. Can we use the latter expression instead of the former? I seldom see the ...
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2answers
2k views

Postpositive adjective in two different sentences?

In these two sentences: He made me angry He heard creatures unseen, both have an adjective at the end. However, we know that unseen can be shifted before creatures to maintain ...
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1answer
2k views

Use of “Proper” as a postpositive adjective

I have an inkling that the following word usage is grammatically-correct; however, it is immensely difficult to search for confirmation, as all I receive for queries like "Proper as an adjective" are ...
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3answers
602 views

The thing proper

I found myself writing this: .. and this is before we consider mathematics proper. It seemed like a natural kind of thing to write, but I couldn't find an example of it. I get the impression it's ...